nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

ongoing:

Little Yāna

various locations, NYC

we’ve enjoyed encountering quite a few of these around town lately, and this appears to be the artist’s Tumblr:

littleyanastreetart.tumblr.com

Opens Tomorrow, Aug 7, 7-9p:

10 Years of Wooster Collective: 2003-2013
 curated by Marc & Sara Schiller

Jonathan LeVine Gallery : Alternate Location : 525 W22nd St., NYC

celebrating the 10 year anniversary of their website, Wooster Collective, Marc and Sara Schiller have assembled an exhibition of works and installations by many of the artists that have been featured on their site, over 50 local and international artists including Bast, Crash, DALeast, Ben Eine, Faile, Shepard Fairey, How & Nosm, Paul Insect, WK Interact, Invader, Mark Jenkins, JR, Anthony Lister, Olek, Blek le Rat, Jordan Seiler, Skullphone, Judith Supine, Swoon, Ron English, London Police, Miss Van, Vhils, Zevs and many more. - thru Aug 24

Opens Tonight, 5-11p:“The Future Is Now” presented by No Agenda, Ad Hoc Art and Melissa McCaig-WellesHighline Loft, 508 W26th St., NYCFriday August 2nd, 2013 10 a-11pSaturday August 3rd, 2013 10 a-11p Sunday August 4th, 2013 10 a-6ppop-up exhibit featuring: Jordan Betten, John Breiner, Ross Brodar, Allison Buxton, Garrison Buxton, John Arthur Carr, Cern, Deedee Cheriel, Chip Love, Steve Cogle, Joseph Conrad- Ferm, COPE2, Spencer Keeton Cunningham, Cycle, CYRCLE, Dalek, Adam Dare, Katrina Del Mar, ELLE DEAD SEX, Brian Ermanski, John FeknerEric Foss, Mike Fitzsimmons, Ellis Gallagher, Mike Giant, Maya Hayuk, Hellbent, David Hochbaum, David Hollier, Michael Holman, Ben Horton, Kimyon Huggins, INDIE 184 , Ian Kuali, Dave Kinsey, Koralie, Kool Kid Kreyola, Nick Kuszyk, Greg LaMarche, Craig LaRotonda, Don Leicht, Chip Love, Adam Ludwig, Joe Lurato, Tara McPherson, Alice Mizrachi, Billy Mode, Morning Breath, NDA, NOBODY, OLEK, David Ortiz, William Quigley, Leon Reid, Skewville, Specter , Beau Stanton, Chris Stain, Swoon, Nick Taylor, Thundercut, , Chris Uphues, Michel Bellici, Andrea Von Bujdoss, Kennedy Yanko, Deborah Yoon

Opens Tonight, 5-11p:

The Future Is Now
 presented by No Agenda, Ad Hoc Art and Melissa McCaig-Welles

Highline Loft, 508 W26th St., NYC
Friday August 2nd, 2013 10 a-11p
Saturday August 3rd, 2013 10 a-11p
Sunday August 4th, 2013 10 a-6p

pop-up exhibit featuring: Jordan Betten, John Breiner, Ross Brodar, Allison Buxton, Garrison Buxton, John Arthur Carr, Cern, Deedee Cheriel, Chip Love, Steve Cogle, Joseph Conrad- Ferm, COPE2, Spencer Keeton Cunningham, Cycle, CYRCLE, Dalek, Adam Dare, Katrina Del Mar, ELLE DEAD SEX, Brian Ermanski, John FeknerEric Foss, Mike Fitzsimmons, Ellis Gallagher, Mike Giant, Maya Hayuk, Hellbent, David Hochbaum, David Hollier, Michael Holman, Ben Horton, Kimyon Huggins, INDIE 184 , Ian Kuali, Dave Kinsey, Koralie, Kool Kid Kreyola, Nick Kuszyk, Greg LaMarche, Craig LaRotonda, Don Leicht, Chip Love, Adam Ludwig, Joe Lurato, Tara McPherson, Alice Mizrachi, Billy Mode, Morning Breath, NDA, NOBODY, OLEK, David Ortiz, William Quigley, Leon Reid, Skewville, Specter , Beau Stanton, Chris Stain, Swoon, Nick Taylor, Thundercut, , Chris Uphues, Michel Bellici, Andrea Von Bujdoss, Kennedy Yanko, Deborah Yoon

Opens Sat, July 6, 6-8p:

From the Street Up
 curated by Royce Bannon and Cassius Fouler

Woodward Gallery, 133 Eldridge St., NYC (bt Broome and Delancey St)

Each of the featured artists are noted for their Public or Street art: John Ahearn, Michael Alan, Richard Hambleton, Robert Janz, NohJColey, Miguel Ovalle, Leon Reid IV, Skewville, Gabriel Specter, Stikman, and UFO. - thru July 31

just opened:“​Uphill Both Ways” Pose & RevokJonathan LeVine Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (9th Floor)Pose’s works reference disparate sources—pop and comic art, skateboard and advertising graphics, collage, sign painting and graffiti. Painting portraits of the human condition, he re-appropriates the visual language of the street and overwhelming experience of consumer culture to convey a broad spectrum of emotions—pain, triumph, joy, fear, love and loss. The exhibition title Uphill Both Ways (inspired by late graffiti artist NEKST), relates to the battles Pose and Revok have faced personally with legal persecution and loss, as well as general themes of the human struggle… - thru July 27

just opened:

“​Uphill Both Ways
 Pose & Revok

Jonathan LeVine Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (9th Floor)

Pose’s works reference disparate sources—pop and comic art, skateboard and advertising graphics, collage, sign painting and graffiti. Painting portraits of the human condition, he re-appropriates the visual language of the street and overwhelming experience of consumer culture to convey a broad spectrum of emotions—pain, triumph, joy, fear, love and loss. The exhibition title Uphill Both Ways (inspired by late graffiti artist NEKST), relates to the battles Pose and Revok have faced personally with legal persecution and loss, as well as general themes of the human struggle… - thru July 27

thru June 7:

Aeromural
 Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter

The Clocktower Gallery, 108 Leonard St., NYC (13th Floor)

Japanese born artist Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter is in the midst of an expansive residency at The Clocktower Gallery in TriBeCa. The first half of the residency has involved the creation of a mural (in his signature “Quick Turn Structure” style) inside of the residency studio with microphones recording the sounds of the aerosol sprays. Theses audio files will be used for the second half of the residency. After the room is painted white again and restored to its original condition it will be turned into a sound installation piece. Many small speakers will reproduce the previously recorded sounds of the painting process and therefore serve as a reminder of the mural that has been created producing these sounds but is already long gone.

Opens May 16, 7-9p:

Pipe Dreams
 Sheryo x The Yok

Krause Gallery, 149 Orchard St., NYC (at Rivington Street)

Brooklyn-based duo Sheryo and the Yok’s first solo show in the United States. Working with varying painting techniques, the artists have culled together collaborative pieces that represent their shared life together. The exhibition will feature a recently completed series of hand painted vases that combine eastern & western elements to portray values of ideology, devotion, relationships, dharma and karma.

The Yok: theyok.tumblr.com
Sheryo:   sheryo.tumblr.com

Opens Friday, May 10, 6-9p:

Even Romantics Love Violence
 Hellbent

Mighty Tanaka Gallery, 111 Front St., Dumbo, NYC (224)

"Hellbent’s first solo gallery show unveils the graffiti / Street Artist doing a new collection  in abstraction, “The Mix Tape Series”.  With each piece named after a song he was listening to while creating it, the series testifies to his intense love of music (from punk to country to big band and indie rock) and the practice of making custom collections for friends and lovers on blank cassettes." - read more at Brooklyn Street Art (photo of studio: Jaime Rojo)

Opens Tues, May 7, 6-8p:

The Wrinkles of the City, Havana Cuba
 JR & José Parlá

Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, 505 W24th St., NYC
brycewolkowitz.tumblr.com

This exhibition will consist of twelve large portraits from the Havana iteration of The Wrinkles of the City project along with a site-specific installation. In 2012, JR and Parlá photographed and interviewed dozens of senior citizens who lived through the Cuban revolution, flyposting colossal black-and-white portraits of their subjects on the walls of city buildings. Parlá, who is of Cuban descent, interlaces the images with palimpsestic, calligraphic writings and color. In a city devoid of commercial imagery, JR and Parlá’s enormous yet intimate portraits offer a stunningly humane contrast to the endless repetition of political icons. - thru July 12

nycARTscene Interview: LNY

LNY’s latest outdoor mural, “The Golden Hour,” is located at 22 East 2nd Street (between Bowery & 2nd Avenue) in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The new artwork launched the 2013 season of Fourth Art Block's Public Art Program.

nycARTscene’s Hannah Krafcik leads us in conversation with the artist:

HK: Your previous public art features an array of creatures—usually hybrid creatures—that are often constrained or engaging in struggle. Can you describe the dynamic between humanity and nature in your work?

LNY: Struggle is definitely a recurring theme in my work, not only because conflict is part of our everyday, but because I find something incredibly beautiful and empowering about overcoming obstacles as part of the human condition. This tends to generate progress. I often like to complicate the depiction of this conflict through the concept of hybridity—animal and human, or machine and animal—because of the romantic and powerful archetypal connections we naturally have to these symbols. Also, hybridity is a big part of my multicultural background—being both Ecuadorian and American, speaking mixed languages, working inside and outside the law, and living in transit.

HK: How might this come into play in your most recent mural with Fourth Arts Block in the East Village? Can you elaborate on the concept?

LNY: This mural, and most of my recent work, has become the long tail result of research, intuition, and improvisation, which is all driven by location, the people I meet and the inherent conflicts the environment offers. The recent mural was born from reading about a dead sperm whale that washed ashore in the Aegean Sea. The Scientists who examined the whale’s corpse, which was both bloated and emaciated, were surprised to find its stomach full of plastic bags. So I imagined that experience of stumbling upon a gigantic whale’s dead body, and how it must feel to have this mountain of dead flesh in front of you…I wanted to replicate that awe and, at the same time, point to the magnitude of this problem: Humans intervening with natural ecosystems and creating climate change.

The narrative of the mural goes on to include a double headed tricolored heron being invaded by nature and technology, which happens to the whale as well as they both struggle to survive. I eventually titled the mural The Golden Hour after the medical term for the window of time following trauma or injury, during which treatment is most effective.    

HK: How would you like your work to engage or activate the people who see it?

LNY: Well, this is one of the most important questions, but also one with the less defined answer. Of course I would like for communities and viewers to either engage the work as an intervention of color and form in architectural space, or to take something positive away from it. This can affect people by simply making them smile, or by even inspiring someone to create something of their own. But it is very hard for me to gauge that reaction because it usually happens long after I’m gone. So, in this case, I’m just left with good wishes and an invitation to participate.

While making this mural, I brought over my growing collection of plastic bags picked up from the streets. Wanting to somehow use them in the mural, I finally decided to have their materiality speak for itself and, along with other trash from the site, I placed them at the entrance of the whale’s mouth. The fun part is that the bags and trash are only flimsily stapled to the wall. You could technically go to the site, like right now, and clean up this metaphorical ocean I painted. Or, you could actually clean a real ocean, upcycle your trash, take some form of action, or become aware of how we are affecting our environment before whales start swimming down alphabet city for brunch. 

HK: What kinds of environments and geographic locations attract and /or inspire you?

LNY: Like most of us, I grew up in the middle of the urban sprawl, from the small and colonial in South America to the immense and complex geography of New York & Seoul. These environments shaped me and gave rise to the language and processes I use to make art today. But what I find most amazing, and what fills me with joy, is being able to imagine a future beyond our current state. To see the possibilities afforded to us by the same technology that can do such harm to the planet and understand that we can create our own healthy and sustainable environments. To me, making free public art, both legal and otherwise, is part of this effort and inspires me to make more and more. In a way, my quest is to prove to myself and others that this ideal is possible and that art can be an integral part of it. Some days this is way easier said that done, but we move on. 

HK: Where are you planning to paint next? Where would you like to put your work next?

LNY: I have a couple of overarching projects I’m working on right now, specifically another collaboration with the Brooklyn based non-profit Young New Yorkers, a show with Newark based Solo(s) Project House during Fountain Art Fair and residency there—plus other surprises for New York and some upcoming trips. What all these projects have in common is the drive to create and interact with people and public space so they all revolve around that idea, even if paint is not involved. I find this more interesting sometimes, as it involves a different approach, collaboration, and new challenges. The question for me its not where would I want to put up work, but where do I need to put up work. Where does it need to exist, and what makes it necessary to manifest there?

photography: Luna Park http://lunapark.tumblr.com/
location: Ideal Glass http://www.idealglass.org/
LNY: http://lurkstudio.tumblr.com/