nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru May 16:“Color Me Badd” curated by Chris Bors NARS Foundation, 201 46th Street, Brooklyn, NY (4th Floor)artists: Amanda Browder, Deborah Brown, Amanda Church, Jennifer Coates, Ketta Ioannidou, Gary Petersen & Nicolas TouronAmanda Browder resuscitates the language of pop art with her fabric wall hangings, using a soft material to create a visual explosion focusing on the interaction of color. Although based on reality, Deborah Brown’s fantastical paintings depict her neighborhood of Bushwick with a glowing palette and gestural brushwork creating a new landscape both surreal and personal. Blending biomorphic abstraction with graphic elements, Amanda Church paints planes of color broken up by curving, anonymous figures as if aliens were discovering our planet or vice versa. With a practice grounded firmly in process, Jennifer Coates’s paintings come together after her surfaces have been attacked and layered with pigment, juxtaposing the ethereal with recognizable patterns. Ketta Ioannidou uses memories from the landscape of her childhood home of Cyprus to create spiraling vegetation on the verge of chaos, commenting on its politically unstable history while reveling in the act of painting. Painter Gary Petersen creates hard-edged abstractions with the eye of a designer using a candy-store palette and crisscrossed lines, forming a dense network of colors. The detailed porcelain and mixed media sculptures of Nicolas Touron transport and energize; an imaginary landscape masked as object.

thru May 16:

Color Me Badd
 curated by Chris Bors
 
NARS Foundation, 201 46th Street, Brooklyn, NY (4th Floor)

artists: Amanda Browder, Deborah Brown, Amanda Church,
Jennifer Coates, Ketta Ioannidou, Gary Petersen & Nicolas Touron

Amanda Browder resuscitates the language of pop art with her fabric wall hangings, using a soft material to create a visual explosion focusing on the interaction of color. Although based on reality, Deborah Brown’s fantastical paintings depict her neighborhood of Bushwick with a glowing palette and gestural brushwork creating a new landscape both surreal and personal. Blending biomorphic abstraction with graphic elements, Amanda Church paints planes of color broken up by curving, anonymous figures as if aliens were discovering our planet or vice versa. With a practice grounded firmly in process, Jennifer Coates’s paintings come together after her surfaces have been attacked and layered with pigment, juxtaposing the ethereal with recognizable patterns. Ketta Ioannidou uses memories from the landscape of her childhood home of Cyprus to create spiraling vegetation on the verge of chaos, commenting on its politically unstable history while reveling in the act of painting. Painter Gary Petersen creates hard-edged abstractions with the eye of a designer using a candy-store palette and crisscrossed lines, forming a dense network of colors. The detailed porcelain and mixed media sculptures of Nicolas Touron transport and energize; an imaginary landscape masked as object.

continues:

last supper” & “mermaid, pig, bro w/ hat
 Urs Fischer

Gagosian Gallery’s Park & 75, 821 Park Ave., NYC
Gagosian Gallery temporary space, 104 Delancey St., NYC

The exhibition is in two parts, uptown and downtown. The uptown exhibition inaugurates the opening of a new Gagosian space, Park & 75, the downtown exhibition is in a former Chase bank branch on the Lower East Side. The uptown gallery contains a single large-scale sculpture last supper, Fischer’s take on the classical religious theme. At the downtown exhibit, features of the bank’s architecture and decor have been retained, from the corporate signage to the vaults—an incongruous setting for Fischer’s guilelessly expressionistic and exuberant sculptures. The cast bronze works, some of which are silver- and gold-plated, are a heterogenous bunch that includes a one-legged boy in an armchair, a big foot, a fireplace, some columns, a bust of Napoleon, a Louis XIV chair, a mermaid (conceived as a functional fountain), a depiction of sleep, a man copulating with a pig, a man and woman embracing, a hat on rocks, a man in a boat, a faceless cat, a pile, a Pièta, a lion in chains, and so on.

“Say what you will about the overall conceit — the bluest of blue-chip dealers slumming it, the whole affair some sort of astroturf DIY effort to seem scrappy and relevant — but Gagosian’s pop-up is actually pretty damn cool. The pieces are plopped throughout the gutted interior, next to water fountains or empty safes, tucked inside the upper shelves of empty closets.” - Scott Indrisek (photos & quote), ARTINFO

Opens April 11:

Submerged Motherlands
 Swoon
 
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYC

Brooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago.

photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq

Opens Tonight, 6-8p:“The Super Can Man and Other Illustrated Classics” Kristen Morgin Zach Feuer Gallery, 548 W22nd St., NYCThe exhibition is populated with sculptures, composed primarily of unfired clay and paint, of super heroes and heroines found in comic books, fairy tales and popular culture.  Some work is re-created as a single object, such as a Little Golden Book edition of Hansel and Gretel.  Other work, like The Ugly Duckling, is seemingly reimaged from repurposed materials one may have on hand -  the stub of a pencil, a Skippy peanut butter jar top and two painted pieces of wood.

Opens Tonight, 6-8p:

The Super Can Man and Other Illustrated Classics
 Kristen Morgin
 
Zach Feuer Gallery, 548 W22nd St., NYC

The exhibition is populated with sculptures, composed primarily of unfired clay and paint, of super heroes and heroines found in comic books, fairy tales and popular culture.  Some work is re-created as a single object, such as a Little Golden Book edition of Hansel and Gretel.  Other work, like The Ugly Duckling, is seemingly reimaged from repurposed materials one may have on hand -  the stub of a pencil, a Skippy peanut butter jar top and two painted pieces of wood.

recently opened:“Overculture” William Powhida Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYCYou know William Powhida and his colorful painted lists of rants, instructions, jokes and truths. Here they are supersized and in oil paint. “My studio practice is based in drawing, which I like to think of more as a thought process than a way of working.  My work tends to draw out a concept, often a critique, through some formal means. Primarily, I’m known for drawings of trompe l’oeil lists and letters authored in the voice of “Powhida,” a sensationalist, self-loathing and unreliable narrator… While it doesn’t take much to get me drawing, following a critical inquiry to unusual and uncomfortable ends is where the energy is, like having a long conversation about coyotes with a taxidermist.” - William Powhida to The L Magazine’s Paul D’Agostinophoto by Jason Andrew

recently opened:

Overculture
 William Powhida
 
Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYC

You know William Powhida and his colorful painted lists of rants, instructions, jokes and truths. Here they are supersized and in oil paint.

“My studio practice is based in drawing, which I like to think of more as a thought process than a way of working.  My work tends to draw out a concept, often a critique, through some formal means. Primarily, I’m known for drawings of trompe l’oeil lists and letters authored in the voice of “Powhida,” a sensationalist, self-loathing and unreliable narrator… While it doesn’t take much to get me drawing, following a critical inquiry to unusual and uncomfortable ends is where the energy is, like having a long conversation about coyotes with a taxidermist.” - William Powhida to The L Magazine’s Paul D’Agostino

photo by Jason Andrew

continues thru Mar 30:“Still.Life” Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,  Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop YoonOUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYCThe most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

continues thru Mar 30:

Still.Life
 Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,
 Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop Yoon

OUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYC


The most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

opens tomorrow, Thurs, 6-8p:“Big Girl Now” Klara Kristalova Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 201 Chrystie St., NYCWith each sculpture, Kristalova builds an imaginative narrative around common emotions and everyday situations, turning to a diversity of influences that include music, memory and current events,  literature, myths and fairytales.  Her slightly unsettling hand-painted figures—often hybrids of human, animal, insect or plant forms—communicate a tension but also a balance between states of being or transformation. The idea of transformation, particularly the age of adolescence as a time of both physical and psychological change, has been a recurring theme in Kristalova’s work. In Big Girl Now, Kristalova presents a group of portraits of women rooted in a more established period of the life cycle, suggesting that the transformation of youth does not cease once one is “grown up”.
pictured: Sneak peek of Kristalova’s during installation. This image features “Keyhole Woman,” (2013), “Young Girl Growing,” (2013) and “Twins,” (2014). Image by Lehmann Maupin.

opens tomorrow, Thurs, 6-8p:

Big Girl Now
 Klara Kristalova
 
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 201 Chrystie St., NYC

With each sculpture, Kristalova builds an imaginative narrative around common emotions and everyday situations, turning to a diversity of influences that include music, memory and current events,  literature, myths and fairytales.  Her slightly unsettling hand-painted figures—often hybrids of human, animal, insect or plant forms—communicate a tension but also a balance between states of being or transformation. The idea of transformation, particularly the age of adolescence as a time of both physical and psychological change, has been a recurring theme in Kristalova’s work. In Big Girl Now, Kristalova presents a group of portraits of women rooted in a more established period of the life cycle, suggesting that the transformation of youth does not cease once one is “grown up”.

pictured: Sneak peek of Kristalova’s during installation. This image features “Keyhole Woman,” (2013), “Young Girl Growing,” (2013) and “Twins,” (2014). Image by Lehmann Maupin.

opens tonight, Feb 19, 6-8p:“«suddenly I felt the river in me»” Carolina Raquel AntichLynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYCfeaturing porcelain artworks and a series of canvases, the exhibition is a purview of Antich’s longtime fascination with childhood. Antich recently embraced a sculptural extension of her paintings, magnifying the delicateness and fragility of her subjects and the situations they are involved in. While the artist’s paintings often evoke an allegorical worldview, depicting children in a territory where there is no fear, a free zone full of nuances and beauty, the sculptural work brings to the fore spaces of protection and refuge, while underscoring the autistic condition of her subjects in their extreme mode of concentration.

opens tonight, Feb 19, 6-8p:

«suddenly I felt the river in me»
 Carolina Raquel Antich

Lynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYC


featuring porcelain artworks and a series of canvases, the exhibition is a purview of Antich’s longtime fascination with childhood. Antich recently embraced a sculptural extension of her paintings, magnifying the delicateness and fragility of her subjects and the situations they are involved in. While the artist’s paintings often evoke an allegorical worldview, depicting children in a territory where there is no fear, a free zone full of nuances and beauty, the sculptural work brings to the fore spaces of protection and refuge, while underscoring the autistic condition of her subjects in their extreme mode of concentration.

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:“Synthesa” Erwin Wurm Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYCWorking in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:

Synthesa
 Erwin Wurm
 
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYC

Working in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

closing Feb 15:

Requiem
 Sally Tittmann
 
William Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYC (corner of Grand St)

The exhibition is centered around a trio of monumental sculptures made of discarded commercial 4 x 4 wooden beams, along with a group of intimate wall sculptures and a series of beautifully rendered large drawings in pencil.