nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru Sept 7:“Object Matter” Robert HeineckenThe Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCThis is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Sept 7:

Object Matter
 Robert Heinecken

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

This is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Aug 3:“Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010”The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCSigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

thru Aug 3:

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

Sigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

thru Aug 10:Tara Donovan Pace Gallery, 534 W25th St., NYCPresents two new large-scale sculptures comprised from index cards and acrylic rods, respectively. With these works, the artist continues to explore the phenomenological effect of work created through the accumulation of identical objects. Untitled (index cards), the first such work created by Donovan, is a 13’ x 25’ x 30’ sculpture in eight parts comprised of several million 3x5” white cards stacked and glued into scores of interweaving columnar forms combining to reach a summit on each element. Also featured is a newly completed untitled sculpture made with thousands of acrylic rods. Donovan spends months or even years searching for a method of assembly that allows the simple and immutable characteristics of the chosen material to generate complex, emergent phenomena which keep the viewer cycling between perception of the parts and the whole between the forms themselves and the light that surrounds and divides them. The work draws on both Minimalist and formalist histories, while creating a radically new form which embraces complexity and iterative processing.

thru Aug 10:

Tara Donovan
 
Pace Gallery, 534 W25th St., NYC

Presents two new large-scale sculptures comprised from index cards and acrylic rods, respectively. With these works, the artist continues to explore the phenomenological effect of work created through the accumulation of identical objects. Untitled (index cards), the first such work created by Donovan, is a 13’ x 25’ x 30’ sculpture in eight parts comprised of several million 3x5” white cards stacked and glued into scores of interweaving columnar forms combining to reach a summit on each element. Also featured is a newly completed untitled sculpture made with thousands of acrylic rods. Donovan spends months or even years searching for a method of assembly that allows the simple and immutable characteristics of the chosen material to generate complex, emergent phenomena which keep the viewer cycling between perception of the parts and the whole between the forms themselves and the light that surrounds and divides them. The work draws on both Minimalist and formalist histories, while creating a radically new form which embraces complexity and iterative processing.

opens Sat, June 14, 6-9p:“This is what sculpture looks like” Rachel Beach, Caitlin Cherry, Monica Cook,  Diana Cooper, Molly Crabapple, Daria Irincheeva,  Natalie Jeremijenko, Saeri Kiritani, Joanna Malinowska,  Michelle Matson, Rachel Mason, Esperanza Mayobre,  Brenna Murphy, Kate Ostler, Shinique Smith, Katie Torn Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYC“There are too many painting shows. There aren’t enough sculpture shows. We are fixing that.”

opens Sat, June 14, 6-9p:

This is what sculpture looks like
 Rachel Beach, Caitlin Cherry, Monica Cook,
 Diana Cooper, Molly Crabapple, Daria Irincheeva,
 Natalie Jeremijenko, Saeri Kiritani, Joanna Malinowska,
 Michelle Matson, Rachel Mason, Esperanza Mayobre,
 Brenna Murphy, Kate Ostler, Shinique Smith, Katie Torn
 
Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYC

“There are too many painting shows. There aren’t enough sculpture shows. We are fixing that.”

opens tomorrow, June 5, 6-8p:

paintingassupermodel
 Franklin Evans
 
Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYC

Evans presents a new installation comprised of wall painting/collages, eight large paintings, 1,500 square feet of digital prints on paper/canvas/silk, photographic sculptures, floor works, and sculpture vitrines that alter the architecture of the gallery.

thru Sept 7:

13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair

Queens Museum, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY

The exhibition takes Warhol’s 13 Most Wanted Men as its single subject, addressing its creation and destruction and placing it in its artistic and social context by combining art, documentation, and archival material. 50 years have passed since an up-and-coming Pop provocateur named Andy Warhol sparked a minor scandal at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. As part of a prominent set of public commissions for the Philip Johnson-designed New York State Pavilion’s exterior, Warhol chose to enlarge mug shots from a NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Forming a chessboard of front and profile views, 13 Most Wanted Men was installed by April 15, 1964, and painted over by Fair officials’ direction with silver paint a few days later.

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:“Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival at the End of the World” Kahn & Selesnick Yancey Richardson Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYCUtilizing photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and performance, Kahn & Selesnick create robust mythic realities for each project, building imaginary, character-driven fictions from kernels of obscure historical truth. This exhibition follows a fictitious cabaret troupe – Truppe Fledermaus (Bat Troupe) – who travel the countryside staging absurd and inscrutable performances in abandoned landscapes for an audience of no one. The playful but dire message presented by the troupe is of impending ecological disaster, caused by rising waters and a warming planet, the immediate consequences of which include the extinction of the Bat, in this mythology a shamanistic figure representing both nature and humanity. In one sense, the entire cabaret troupe can be seen as a direct reflection of the artists themselves, both entities employing farce and black humor to engage utterly serious concerns. - thru July 3

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:

Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival at the End of the World
 Kahn & Selesnick
 
Yancey Richardson Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYC

Utilizing photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and performance, Kahn & Selesnick create robust mythic realities for each project, building imaginary, character-driven fictions from kernels of obscure historical truth. This exhibition follows a fictitious cabaret troupe – Truppe Fledermaus (Bat Troupe) – who travel the countryside staging absurd and inscrutable performances in abandoned landscapes for an audience of no one. The playful but dire message presented by the troupe is of impending ecological disaster, caused by rising waters and a warming planet, the immediate consequences of which include the extinction of the Bat, in this mythology a shamanistic figure representing both nature and humanity. In one sense, the entire cabaret troupe can be seen as a direct reflection of the artists themselves, both entities employing farce and black humor to engage utterly serious concerns. - thru July 3

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:“Rx for Viewing” Grant Foster / Jesse Wine Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYCa two-person exhibition that brings together the work of London-based artists Grant Foster and Jesse Wine, artists that eschew the contemporary preference toward multi-media and mixed media works. Foster and Wine work unabashedly in one medium: painting and ceramics, respectively. The palpable humor of the works on view, alternatingly mischievous and dark, suggests ambivalence toward contemporary culture, its feigned invocations of morality and the cookie-cutter mentality of digital reproductions. But despite the tone of satire, the works are richly textured, executed delicately, and, ultimately, with a distinct tenderness toward their subject matter.- thru June 9

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:

Rx for Viewing
 Grant Foster / Jesse Wine
 
Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYC

a two-person exhibition that brings together the work of London-based artists Grant Foster and Jesse Wine, artists that eschew the contemporary preference toward multi-media and mixed media works. Foster and Wine work unabashedly in one medium: painting and ceramics, respectively. The palpable humor of the works on view, alternatingly mischievous and dark, suggests ambivalence toward contemporary culture, its feigned invocations of morality and the cookie-cutter mentality of digital reproductions. But despite the tone of satire, the works are richly textured, executed delicately, and, ultimately, with a distinct tenderness toward their subject matter.- thru June 9

opens tonight, Wed, May 14, 6-8p:“War Stories” curated by Anthony Haden GuestWilliam Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYCWar Stories brings together an impressive and diverse group of artists, whose work focuses primarily on war and conflict. The exhibition features Steve Mumford's documentary watercolors from Iraq and Afghanistan, poured paint castings of Taliban gunshot holes by Piers Secunda, video work of Desert Storm by Nin Brudermann, Farideh Sakhaiefar's conceptual display of smuggled Iranian war objects, photography by Trevor Paglen, terrorist bomb sculptures by Gregory Green, and Alfredo Martinez's firearms drawings alongside a video interview by Mika Mattila.  - thru June 21

opens tonight, Wed, May 14, 6-8p:

War Stories
 curated by Anthony Haden Guest

William Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYC

War Stories brings together an impressive and diverse group of artists, whose work focuses primarily on war and conflict. The exhibition features Steve Mumford's documentary watercolors from Iraq and Afghanistan, poured paint castings of Taliban gunshot holes by Piers Secunda, video work of Desert Storm by Nin Brudermann, Farideh Sakhaiefar's conceptual display of smuggled Iranian war objects, photography by Trevor Paglen, terrorist bomb sculptures by Gregory Green, and Alfredo Martinez's firearms drawings alongside a video interview by Mika Mattila.  - thru June 21

recently opened:“SUNRISE SUNSET” Sterling Ruby Hauser & Wirth Gallery, 511 W18th St., NYCSterling Ruby’s studio has been described as ‘an archive, a vessel’ filled with a plethora of art objects and materials, including failures, successes, and pieces that offer the potential to be reclaimed and reanimated as new forms. The works on view in ‘SUNRISE SUNSET’ represent the many modes of the artist’s production but play upon a central motif: a tension between the horizon lines of the artist’s monumental paintings, and the circular forms in primary colors that are found in a mobile, the collages, and sculptures. - thru July 25

recently opened:

SUNRISE SUNSET
 Sterling Ruby
 
Hauser & Wirth Gallery, 511 W18th St., NYC

Sterling Ruby’s studio has been described as ‘an archive, a vessel’ filled with a plethora of art objects and materials, including failures, successes, and pieces that offer the potential to be reclaimed and reanimated as new forms. The works on view in ‘SUNRISE SUNSET’ represent the many modes of the artist’s production but play upon a central motif: a tension between the horizon lines of the artist’s monumental paintings, and the circular forms in primary colors that are found in a mobile, the collages, and sculptures. - thru July 25