nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru Sept 7:“Object Matter” Robert HeineckenThe Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCThis is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Sept 7:

Object Matter
 Robert Heinecken

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

This is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Aug 3:“Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010”The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCSigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

thru Aug 3:

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

Sigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

recently opened:

Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe
 
Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Ave., NYC (at 89th St)

The first comprehensive retrospective of Italian Futurism in a U.S. museum, the exhibition traces the full development of Futurism in Italy, from its inception with F. T. Marinetti’s publication of the Futurist manifesto in 1909 to its demise at the end of World War II. Featuring more than 360 works, including noted paintings and sculptures such as Giacomo Balla’s Paths of Movement + Dynamic Sequences (1913) and Benedetta’s Syntheses of Communications (1933–34), which has never before been presented in America, the exhibition also examines the Futurists’ efforts to refashion everyday life through advertising, architecture, design, fashion, film, music, photography, poetry, and theater.
exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism

pictured:
Gino Severini, Blue Dancer (Ballerina blu), 1912
Futurist Manifesto from 1909 (photo: Suzanne DeChillo/NY Times)
Benedetta Cappa (photo: Suzanne DeChillo/NY Times)
Ardengo Soffici, Simultaneity and Lyrical Chemistry, 1915 (photo: Suzanne DeChillo/NY Times)

closing soon, ends Jan 12:

Extreme Measures
 Chris Burden
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

Spanning a forty-year career and moving across mediums, “Extreme Measures” presents a selection of Burden’s work focused on weights and measures, boundaries and constraints, where physical and moral limits are called into question.

“As an artist, [Burden] was fast out of the gate, establishing his reputation with a series of exquisitely simple, often incendiary performances from 1971 to 1977. Many lasted only a few seconds, others for up to three weeks. But they tested will, discipline and endurance, sometimes to the point of real danger…  Few people saw Mr. Burden’s performances, but no matter: the best of them could be reduced to a vivid sentence or two that, once heard, stuck in the mind. By the mid-1970s, they formed a familiar litany of indelible acts and documentary photographs. After 54 performances, Mr. Burden succumbed to performance art’s primary occupational hazard: It was too grueling. He had always considered his performances sculptures, and now he turned to making sculptures that he saw as performances: feats or demonstrations that delved more deeply into reality with forms other than his body. His art-world visibility shrank because his efforts could no longer be distilled to an unforgettable sentence or two. They had to be experienced directly, which is what the New Museum’s spacious exhibition is all about.” - Roberta Smith, New York Times

thru Jan 4:“Richard Van Buren: The 1970s”Garth Greenan Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (10th fl)the exhibition is the first ever large-scale presentation of Van Buren’s work from this period. Fifteen of the artist’s densely layered abstract sculptures are on view, providing a survey of the artist’s work during the 1970s — polyester biomorphs impregnated with materials as seemingly disparate as rock salt, cadmium, and wallpaper paste.“Van Buren’s understanding of time is what sets him apart from his peers. His works are not about the timeless present (Judd and Dan Flavin) or the body (Eva Hesse), nor do they reference art history — Jackson Pollock’s poured paintings, for example. Rather, they acknowledge that time shapes us into forms that we may be unable to recognize, which, if you think about it, is a rather disquieting perception of infinity. Add to this Van Buren’s embrace of disparate, seemingly incommensurable materials, as well as the processes that he invented, but refused to turn into signature gestures, and one begins to get a sense of the enormity of his achievement.” - John Yau, Hyperallergic

thru Jan 4:

Richard Van Buren: The 1970s

Garth Greenan Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (10th fl)

the exhibition is the first ever large-scale presentation of Van Buren’s work from this period. Fifteen of the artist’s densely layered abstract sculptures are on view, providing a survey of the artist’s work during the 1970s — polyester biomorphs impregnated with materials as seemingly disparate as rock salt, cadmium, and wallpaper paste.

“Van Buren’s understanding of time is what sets him apart from his peers. His works are not about the timeless present (Judd and Dan Flavin) or the body (Eva Hesse), nor do they reference art history — Jackson Pollock’s poured paintings, for example. Rather, they acknowledge that time shapes us into forms that we may be unable to recognize, which, if you think about it, is a rather disquieting perception of infinity. Add to this Van Buren’s embrace of disparate, seemingly incommensurable materials, as well as the processes that he invented, but refused to turn into signature gestures, and one begins to get a sense of the enormity of his achievement.” - John Yau, Hyperallergic

thru Mar 10:

Isa Genzken: Retrospective
 

MoMA, 11 W53rd St., NYC

Isa Genzken is arguably one of the most important and influential female artists of the past 30 years. This exhibition, the first comprehensive retrospective of her diverse body of work in an American museum, and the largest to date, encompasses Genzken’s work in all mediums over the past 40 years. Although a New York art audience might be familiar with Genzken’s more recent assemblage sculptures, the breadth of her achievement—which includes not only three-dimensional work but also paintings, photographs, collages, drawings, artist’s books, films, and public sculptures—is still largely unknown in this country. Many of the roughly 150 objects in the exhibition are on view in the United States for the first time.

continues thru Feb 2:MIKE KELLEYMoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave., Long Island City, NYMoMAps1.tumblr.com“the largest exhibition of the artist’s work to-date and the first comprehensive survey since 1993. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of our time, Mike Kelley (1954–2012) produced a body of deeply innovative work mining American popular culture and both modernist and alternative traditions—which he set in relation to relentless self- and social examinations, both dark and delirious. Bringing together over 200 works, from early pieces made during the 1970s through 2012, the exhibition occupies the entire museum. This exhibition marks the biggest exhibition MoMA PS1 has ever organized since its inceptual Rooms exhibition in 1976.”

continues thru Feb 2:

MIKE KELLEY

MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave., Long Island City, NY

MoMAps1.tumblr.com

“the largest exhibition of the artist’s work to-date and the first comprehensive survey since 1993. Regarded as one of the most influential artists of our time, Mike Kelley (1954–2012) produced a body of deeply innovative work mining American popular culture and both modernist and alternative traditions—which he set in relation to relentless self- and social examinations, both dark and delirious. Bringing together over 200 works, from early pieces made during the 1970s through 2012, the exhibition occupies the entire museum. This exhibition marks the biggest exhibition MoMA PS1 has ever organized since its inceptual Rooms exhibition in 1976.”

recently opened:“Change and Horizontals” Sean ScullyThe Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC$5 (admission is free on Thursdays, 6–8pm)This intensely focused survey comprises Sean Scully’s acrylic, ink, graphite, and masking-tape drawings from 1974–75—presented together for the first time in over 30 years—as well as two large-scale paintings from the same period and one of the artist’s personal notebooks. Scully’s maturation as a painter can easily be traced back to innovations in his early drawings. These drawings are marked by refined geometries that re-imagine the history of abstraction as an art rooted in experience—“something felt and something seen,” as the artist has said. Executed in London and New York City respectively, the Change and Horizontals drawings, along with their preparatory sketches and never-before-seen experimental typewriter drawings from the same period, highlight Scully’s core concern with line and color’s relation to place. Viewed together, the works chart an evolution of composition and gesture that provides unique insight into this artist’s singular aesthetic. This New York exhibition is the last stop on a tour that included the UK, Germany, and Italy. - thru Nov 3

recently opened:

Change and Horizontals
 Sean Scully

The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC
$5 (admission is free on Thursdays, 6–8pm)

This intensely focused survey comprises Sean Scully’s acrylic, ink, graphite, and masking-tape drawings from 1974–75—presented together for the first time in over 30 years—as well as two large-scale paintings from the same period and one of the artist’s personal notebooks. Scully’s maturation as a painter can easily be traced back to innovations in his early drawings. These drawings are marked by refined geometries that re-imagine the history of abstraction as an art rooted in experience—“something felt and something seen,” as the artist has said. Executed in London and New York City respectively, the Change and Horizontals drawings, along with their preparatory sketches and never-before-seen experimental typewriter drawings from the same period, highlight Scully’s core concern with line and color’s relation to place. Viewed together, the works chart an evolution of composition and gesture that provides unique insight into this artist’s singular aesthetic. This New York exhibition is the last stop on a tour that included the UK, Germany, and Italy. - thru Nov 3

continues thru Sept 21:“Sculpture: A Retrospective” Ken PriceMetropolitan Museum of Modern Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., NYC (at 82nd St)the first major museum exhibition of Ken Price’s work in New York, traces the development of his ceramic sculptures with approximately sixty-five examples from 1959 to 2012. The selection ranges from the luminously glazed ovoid forms of Price’s early work to the suggestive, molten-like slumps he has made since the 1990s. In addition to the sculpture, the exhibition features eleven late works on paper by the artist. Price’s close friend, the architect Frank Gehry, designed the exhibition.

continues thru Sept 21:

Sculpture: A Retrospective
 Ken Price

Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., NYC (at 82nd St)

the first major museum exhibition of Ken Price’s work in New York, traces the development of his ceramic sculptures with approximately sixty-five examples from 1959 to 2012. The selection ranges from the luminously glazed ovoid forms of Price’s early work to the suggestive, molten-like slumps he has made since the 1990s. In addition to the sculpture, the exhibition features eleven late works on paper by the artist. Price’s close friend, the architect Frank Gehry, designed the exhibition.

closing soon (Sept 1):Llyn FoulkesNew Museum, 235 Bowery, NYCAn influential yet under-recognized artist of his generation, Foulkes makes work that stands out for its raw, immediate, and visceral qualities. Coming from a tradition of West Coast artists working in assemblage in the ’60s, such as Ed Kienholz and Bruce Conner, Foulkes has consistently challenged audiences and expanded his work into new territories. His presentation at the New Museum features nearly one hundred works from the scope of his fifty-year career. These range from the emotionally charged constructions of the early 1960s and his impeccably painted landscapes of the American West, to his deeply disturbing portraits from the late 1970s and his remarkable recent narrative tableaux, which seamlessly blend painting with found materials to create an extraordinary illusion of depth. His diverse body of work resists categorization and defies expectations, distinguishing Foulkes as a truly unique and significant artistic voice.

closing soon (Sept 1):

Llyn Foulkes

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

An influential yet under-recognized artist of his generation, Foulkes makes work that stands out for its raw, immediate, and visceral qualities. Coming from a tradition of West Coast artists working in assemblage in the ’60s, such as Ed Kienholz and Bruce Conner, Foulkes has consistently challenged audiences and expanded his work into new territories. His presentation at the New Museum features nearly one hundred works from the scope of his fifty-year career. These range from the emotionally charged constructions of the early 1960s and his impeccably painted landscapes of the American West, to his deeply disturbing portraits from the late 1970s and his remarkable recent narrative tableaux, which seamlessly blend painting with found materials to create an extraordinary illusion of depth. His diverse body of work resists categorization and defies expectations, distinguishing Foulkes as a truly unique and significant artistic voice.