nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:“Synthesa” Erwin Wurm Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYCWorking in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:

Synthesa
 Erwin Wurm
 
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYC

Working in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:“Willkommen” Carina BrandesTeam Gallery, 83 Grand St., NYCCarina Brandes’s black and white photographs are fever dreams: the familiar becomes foreign, the quotidian surreal. Brandes ties her own artistic practice to that of magical ritual, with her actors’ choreographed but bizarre positions recalling pagan rites, while the prevalence of water and other liquids as motifs suggest alchemy.  - thru Feb 16

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:

Willkommen
 Carina Brandes

Team Gallery, 83 Grand St., NYC

Carina Brandes’s black and white photographs are fever dreams: the familiar becomes foreign, the quotidian surreal. Brandes ties her own artistic practice to that of magical ritual, with her actors’ choreographed but bizarre positions recalling pagan rites, while the prevalence of water and other liquids as motifs suggest alchemy.  - thru Feb 16

thru Mar 10:

Isa Genzken: Retrospective
 

MoMA, 11 W53rd St., NYC

Isa Genzken is arguably one of the most important and influential female artists of the past 30 years. This exhibition, the first comprehensive retrospective of her diverse body of work in an American museum, and the largest to date, encompasses Genzken’s work in all mediums over the past 40 years. Although a New York art audience might be familiar with Genzken’s more recent assemblage sculptures, the breadth of her achievement—which includes not only three-dimensional work but also paintings, photographs, collages, drawings, artist’s books, films, and public sculptures—is still largely unknown in this country. Many of the roughly 150 objects in the exhibition are on view in the United States for the first time.

Opening Fri, Jan 3, 7-9p:“One Trace After” Elizabeth Orr, Carlos Reyes, Claudia Weber, Geo Wyeth curated by Alison Burstein exhibition’s Tumblr: onetraceafter.tumblr.comNURTUREart, 56 Bogart St., Brooklyn, NYOne Trace After investigates a question that traditional, tidy exhibition narratives rarely consider: what can the visitor of a gallery see, experience, or know at any given instant? Rather than suggesting a prescribed or definitive answer, this exhibition embraces the fact that a visitor can never fully take in an artwork or a group of artworks in a single viewing. Since an artwork’s characteristics reveal themselves in pieces as they circulate through discourse, emerge in relation to a context, or unfold over an extended duration, visitors can only ever grasp a “trace” of an artwork in one encounter—a moment of the work’s dynamic existence that reflects both its immanent conditions and its immediate surroundings.  - thru Jan 31

Opening Fri, Jan 3, 7-9p:

One Trace After
 Elizabeth Orr, Carlos Reyes, Claudia Weber, Geo Wyeth
 curated by Alison Burstein
 
exhibition’s Tumblr: onetraceafter.tumblr.com

NURTUREart, 56 Bogart St., Brooklyn, NY

One Trace After investigates a question that traditional, tidy exhibition narratives rarely consider: what can the visitor of a gallery see, experience, or know at any given instant? Rather than suggesting a prescribed or definitive answer, this exhibition embraces the fact that a visitor can never fully take in an artwork or a group of artworks in a single viewing. Since an artwork’s characteristics reveal themselves in pieces as they circulate through discourse, emerge in relation to a context, or unfold over an extended duration, visitors can only ever grasp a “trace” of an artwork in one encounter—a moment of the work’s dynamic existence that reflects both its immanent conditions and its immediate surroundings.  - thru Jan 31

recently opened:“Feathers” Klemens GasserGasser & Grunert Gallery, 33 Orchard St., NYC“ … oh I forgot the hunting the deer the beloved father the nailed to the cross deer on the hut. He cut the fur + skin below the hooves, plus a vertical Newman cut, Fontana cut, men can go horizontal only if the photograph an ocean horizon, the animals love a vertical slice a butcher samurai lift and slice down so did he then he pulled the skin downwards revealing the beautiful pattern of flesh and other things on it—fatty veiny—the deer reminded me of skinned rabbits I seen before at least in reproduction—photographic reproduction—not internet at that time no endless worldconnecting sales catalogues then—selling is another of their qualities—men like to sell and to chat and to sell they live to sell they come after production they are worse than finance they sell, chat and break and then they get drunk and drugged and chat some more and sell again and chat and sell they never produce they are secondary and we let them blow up their boasting secondary istrionism and raise their manly kids to their boasting blown up ridiculosity chatting again and selling and financing it, their boasting Irish Night …” - Klemens Gasser

recently opened:

Feathers
 Klemens Gasser

Gasser & Grunert Gallery, 33 Orchard St., NYC

“ … oh I forgot the hunting the deer the beloved father the nailed to the cross deer on the hut. He cut the fur + skin below the hooves, plus a vertical Newman cut, Fontana cut, men can go horizontal only if the photograph an ocean horizon, the animals love a vertical slice a butcher samurai lift and slice down so did he then he pulled the skin downwards revealing the beautiful pattern of flesh and other things on it—fatty veiny—the deer reminded me of skinned rabbits I seen before at least in reproduction—photographic reproduction—not internet at that time no endless worldconnecting sales catalogues then—selling is another of their qualities—men like to sell and to chat and to sell they live to sell they come after production they are worse than finance they sell, chat and break and then they get drunk and drugged and chat some more and sell again and chat and sell they never produce they are secondary and we let them blow up their boasting secondary istrionism and raise their manly kids to their boasting blown up ridiculosity chatting again and selling and financing it, their boasting Irish Night …” - Klemens Gasser

opens Tonight, Wed, Nov 13, 7-9p: Valérie Blass presented by Parisian LaundryThe Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYCThis exhibition kicks off the new Hole initiative where the Gallery 3 space will be used intermittently to showcase top young galleries from cities outside of New York and around the world as they present solo exhibitions of their gallery artists. Valérie Blass presents new sculptures and photographs that explore intersections between three-dimensional object and image. Her works shift our recognition through assemblage and theatrical staging. Like the black curtain that conceals a backstage, Blass provides hints at mechanisms of interchangeability.

opens Tonight, Wed, Nov 13, 7-9p:

 Valérie Blass
 presented by Parisian Laundry

The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYC

This exhibition kicks off the new Hole initiative where the Gallery 3 space will be used intermittently to showcase top young galleries from cities outside of New York and around the world as they present solo exhibitions of their gallery artists. Valérie Blass presents new sculptures and photographs that explore intersections between three-dimensional object and image. Her works shift our recognition through assemblage and theatrical staging. Like the black curtain that conceals a backstage, Blass provides hints at mechanisms of interchangeability.

thru Dec 1:

Flying Houses
 Laurent Chéhère

Muriel Guépin Gallery, 83 Orchard St., NYC

a collection of fantastical buildings, homes, tents and trailers removed from their backgrounds and suspended in the sky as if permanently airborne.

continues thru Jan 22:

Christopher Wool

Guggenheim, 1071 5th Ave., NYC

“Over a career that spans three decades, Christopher Wool has conducted a riveting investigation into the question of how to make a painting at a time when new possibilities for the medium might seem exhausted… Wool was born in 1955 and grew up in Chicago. By the time that he turned eighteen he had moved to downtown New York City, where the anarchic energy of the punk and No Wave scenes were a defining influence on his creative development. At the outset of his mature career in the mid-1980s, Wool abstained from the seductive expressionism of color and the gestural brushstroke in favor of stark, monochrome compositions that employed commercial tools and imagery appropriated from mass culture. His breakthrough body of work used rollers and stamps to transfer decorative patterns in severe black enamel to a white ground. His “word paintings” from the same period focused on language as image, confronting the viewer
 with anxious, enigmatic imperatives even as the stenciled letters disintegrate into abstract geometries. In both cases, Wool used unexpected breakdowns in his formal systems—slips and glitches, fractured text and erratic spacing—to convey emotional states ranging from pathos to aggression… Since the early 2000s, Wool has worked almost entirely with abstract forms, at once mediating and renewing the expressive potential of painting through strategies of replication, erasure, and digital manipulation.”

Opens Thurs, Oct 24, 6-9p:“Retooled Appliances” Michel de Broinbitforms gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (2nd Floor)first solo exhibition in the United States by Montréal-based artist Michel de Broin, best known for interventions and his re-functionalization of utilitarian objects. Rooted in conceptual premises, de Broin’s work generates unexpected levels of complexity from found objects and physical juxtapositions. The exhibition at bitforms gallery features five pieces. Ranging from assemblage to video and photography, these works explore notions of the technological unconscious, as well as resistance and entropy. - thru Dec 7

Opens Thurs, Oct 24, 6-9p:

Retooled Appliances
 Michel de Broin

bitforms gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (2nd Floor)

first solo exhibition in the United States by Montréal-based artist Michel de Broin, best known for interventions and his re-functionalization of utilitarian objects. Rooted in conceptual premises, de Broin’s work generates unexpected levels of complexity from found objects and physical juxtapositions. The exhibition at bitforms gallery features five pieces. Ranging from assemblage to video and photography, these works explore notions of the technological unconscious, as well as resistance and entropy. - thru Dec 7

Opens Oct 30, 6-8p:“The Swimming Lessons (1981), Translating Duchamp’s Green Box” Robert C. MorganRooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYCfirst New York showing of this complete work, which has remained in storage since its first venue at the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita, Kansas (1981). Morgan became involved in studying the work of Duchamp and was taken by the following passage excerpted from an interview with Pierre Cabanne: “…I didn’t just float along! I had eight years of swimming lessons.” Morgan decided to use a phrase from this quote for his conceptually based work. The project involved working in many mediums, ranging from drawing to artists’ books, from painting to performance (many of which occurred in swimming pools), from super-8 film to video. One of his most important works was a series of ten drawings completed in 1981, involving photographs taken systemically from a videotape of two young women translating Duchamp’s Green Box notes. Although the original tape of this translation apparently disappeared, the still photographs, taken by the artist, were used to create a conceptual work, titled The Swimming Lessons. - thru Dec 1

Opens Oct 30, 6-8p:

The Swimming Lessons (1981), Translating Duchamp’s Green Box
 Robert C. Morgan

Rooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYC

first New York showing of this complete work, which has remained in storage since its first venue at the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita, Kansas (1981). Morgan became involved in studying the work of Duchamp and was taken by the following passage excerpted from an interview with Pierre Cabanne: “…I didn’t just float along! I had eight years of swimming lessons.” Morgan decided to use a phrase from this quote for his conceptually based work. The project involved working in many mediums, ranging from drawing to artists’ books, from painting to performance (many of which occurred in swimming pools), from super-8 film to video. One of his most important works was a series of ten drawings completed in 1981, involving photographs taken systemically from a videotape of two young women translating Duchamp’s Green Box notes. Although the original tape of this translation apparently disappeared, the still photographs, taken by the artist, were used to create a conceptual work, titled The Swimming Lessons. - thru Dec 1