nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru Sept 7:“Object Matter” Robert HeineckenThe Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCThis is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Sept 7:

Object Matter
 Robert Heinecken

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

This is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Aug 3:“Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010”The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCSigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

thru Aug 3:

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

Sigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:“Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival at the End of the World” Kahn & Selesnick Yancey Richardson Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYCUtilizing photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and performance, Kahn & Selesnick create robust mythic realities for each project, building imaginary, character-driven fictions from kernels of obscure historical truth. This exhibition follows a fictitious cabaret troupe – Truppe Fledermaus (Bat Troupe) – who travel the countryside staging absurd and inscrutable performances in abandoned landscapes for an audience of no one. The playful but dire message presented by the troupe is of impending ecological disaster, caused by rising waters and a warming planet, the immediate consequences of which include the extinction of the Bat, in this mythology a shamanistic figure representing both nature and humanity. In one sense, the entire cabaret troupe can be seen as a direct reflection of the artists themselves, both entities employing farce and black humor to engage utterly serious concerns. - thru July 3

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:

Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival at the End of the World
 Kahn & Selesnick
 
Yancey Richardson Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYC

Utilizing photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and performance, Kahn & Selesnick create robust mythic realities for each project, building imaginary, character-driven fictions from kernels of obscure historical truth. This exhibition follows a fictitious cabaret troupe – Truppe Fledermaus (Bat Troupe) – who travel the countryside staging absurd and inscrutable performances in abandoned landscapes for an audience of no one. The playful but dire message presented by the troupe is of impending ecological disaster, caused by rising waters and a warming planet, the immediate consequences of which include the extinction of the Bat, in this mythology a shamanistic figure representing both nature and humanity. In one sense, the entire cabaret troupe can be seen as a direct reflection of the artists themselves, both entities employing farce and black humor to engage utterly serious concerns. - thru July 3

opens tonight, Wed, May 14, 6-8p:“War Stories” curated by Anthony Haden GuestWilliam Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYCWar Stories brings together an impressive and diverse group of artists, whose work focuses primarily on war and conflict. The exhibition features Steve Mumford's documentary watercolors from Iraq and Afghanistan, poured paint castings of Taliban gunshot holes by Piers Secunda, video work of Desert Storm by Nin Brudermann, Farideh Sakhaiefar's conceptual display of smuggled Iranian war objects, photography by Trevor Paglen, terrorist bomb sculptures by Gregory Green, and Alfredo Martinez's firearms drawings alongside a video interview by Mika Mattila.  - thru June 21

opens tonight, Wed, May 14, 6-8p:

War Stories
 curated by Anthony Haden Guest

William Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYC

War Stories brings together an impressive and diverse group of artists, whose work focuses primarily on war and conflict. The exhibition features Steve Mumford's documentary watercolors from Iraq and Afghanistan, poured paint castings of Taliban gunshot holes by Piers Secunda, video work of Desert Storm by Nin Brudermann, Farideh Sakhaiefar's conceptual display of smuggled Iranian war objects, photography by Trevor Paglen, terrorist bomb sculptures by Gregory Green, and Alfredo Martinez's firearms drawings alongside a video interview by Mika Mattila.  - thru June 21

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:“Synthesa” Erwin Wurm Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYCWorking in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:

Synthesa
 Erwin Wurm
 
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYC

Working in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:“Willkommen” Carina BrandesTeam Gallery, 83 Grand St., NYCCarina Brandes’s black and white photographs are fever dreams: the familiar becomes foreign, the quotidian surreal. Brandes ties her own artistic practice to that of magical ritual, with her actors’ choreographed but bizarre positions recalling pagan rites, while the prevalence of water and other liquids as motifs suggest alchemy.  - thru Feb 16

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:

Willkommen
 Carina Brandes

Team Gallery, 83 Grand St., NYC

Carina Brandes’s black and white photographs are fever dreams: the familiar becomes foreign, the quotidian surreal. Brandes ties her own artistic practice to that of magical ritual, with her actors’ choreographed but bizarre positions recalling pagan rites, while the prevalence of water and other liquids as motifs suggest alchemy.  - thru Feb 16

thru Mar 10:

Isa Genzken: Retrospective
 

MoMA, 11 W53rd St., NYC

Isa Genzken is arguably one of the most important and influential female artists of the past 30 years. This exhibition, the first comprehensive retrospective of her diverse body of work in an American museum, and the largest to date, encompasses Genzken’s work in all mediums over the past 40 years. Although a New York art audience might be familiar with Genzken’s more recent assemblage sculptures, the breadth of her achievement—which includes not only three-dimensional work but also paintings, photographs, collages, drawings, artist’s books, films, and public sculptures—is still largely unknown in this country. Many of the roughly 150 objects in the exhibition are on view in the United States for the first time.

Opening Fri, Jan 3, 7-9p:“One Trace After” Elizabeth Orr, Carlos Reyes, Claudia Weber, Geo Wyeth curated by Alison Burstein exhibition’s Tumblr: onetraceafter.tumblr.comNURTUREart, 56 Bogart St., Brooklyn, NYOne Trace After investigates a question that traditional, tidy exhibition narratives rarely consider: what can the visitor of a gallery see, experience, or know at any given instant? Rather than suggesting a prescribed or definitive answer, this exhibition embraces the fact that a visitor can never fully take in an artwork or a group of artworks in a single viewing. Since an artwork’s characteristics reveal themselves in pieces as they circulate through discourse, emerge in relation to a context, or unfold over an extended duration, visitors can only ever grasp a “trace” of an artwork in one encounter—a moment of the work’s dynamic existence that reflects both its immanent conditions and its immediate surroundings.  - thru Jan 31

Opening Fri, Jan 3, 7-9p:

One Trace After
 Elizabeth Orr, Carlos Reyes, Claudia Weber, Geo Wyeth
 curated by Alison Burstein
 
exhibition’s Tumblr: onetraceafter.tumblr.com

NURTUREart, 56 Bogart St., Brooklyn, NY

One Trace After investigates a question that traditional, tidy exhibition narratives rarely consider: what can the visitor of a gallery see, experience, or know at any given instant? Rather than suggesting a prescribed or definitive answer, this exhibition embraces the fact that a visitor can never fully take in an artwork or a group of artworks in a single viewing. Since an artwork’s characteristics reveal themselves in pieces as they circulate through discourse, emerge in relation to a context, or unfold over an extended duration, visitors can only ever grasp a “trace” of an artwork in one encounter—a moment of the work’s dynamic existence that reflects both its immanent conditions and its immediate surroundings.  - thru Jan 31

recently opened:“Feathers” Klemens GasserGasser & Grunert Gallery, 33 Orchard St., NYC“ … oh I forgot the hunting the deer the beloved father the nailed to the cross deer on the hut. He cut the fur + skin below the hooves, plus a vertical Newman cut, Fontana cut, men can go horizontal only if the photograph an ocean horizon, the animals love a vertical slice a butcher samurai lift and slice down so did he then he pulled the skin downwards revealing the beautiful pattern of flesh and other things on it—fatty veiny—the deer reminded me of skinned rabbits I seen before at least in reproduction—photographic reproduction—not internet at that time no endless worldconnecting sales catalogues then—selling is another of their qualities—men like to sell and to chat and to sell they live to sell they come after production they are worse than finance they sell, chat and break and then they get drunk and drugged and chat some more and sell again and chat and sell they never produce they are secondary and we let them blow up their boasting secondary istrionism and raise their manly kids to their boasting blown up ridiculosity chatting again and selling and financing it, their boasting Irish Night …” - Klemens Gasser

recently opened:

Feathers
 Klemens Gasser

Gasser & Grunert Gallery, 33 Orchard St., NYC

“ … oh I forgot the hunting the deer the beloved father the nailed to the cross deer on the hut. He cut the fur + skin below the hooves, plus a vertical Newman cut, Fontana cut, men can go horizontal only if the photograph an ocean horizon, the animals love a vertical slice a butcher samurai lift and slice down so did he then he pulled the skin downwards revealing the beautiful pattern of flesh and other things on it—fatty veiny—the deer reminded me of skinned rabbits I seen before at least in reproduction—photographic reproduction—not internet at that time no endless worldconnecting sales catalogues then—selling is another of their qualities—men like to sell and to chat and to sell they live to sell they come after production they are worse than finance they sell, chat and break and then they get drunk and drugged and chat some more and sell again and chat and sell they never produce they are secondary and we let them blow up their boasting secondary istrionism and raise their manly kids to their boasting blown up ridiculosity chatting again and selling and financing it, their boasting Irish Night …” - Klemens Gasser

opens Tonight, Wed, Nov 13, 7-9p: Valérie Blass presented by Parisian LaundryThe Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYCThis exhibition kicks off the new Hole initiative where the Gallery 3 space will be used intermittently to showcase top young galleries from cities outside of New York and around the world as they present solo exhibitions of their gallery artists. Valérie Blass presents new sculptures and photographs that explore intersections between three-dimensional object and image. Her works shift our recognition through assemblage and theatrical staging. Like the black curtain that conceals a backstage, Blass provides hints at mechanisms of interchangeability.

opens Tonight, Wed, Nov 13, 7-9p:

 Valérie Blass
 presented by Parisian Laundry

The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYC

This exhibition kicks off the new Hole initiative where the Gallery 3 space will be used intermittently to showcase top young galleries from cities outside of New York and around the world as they present solo exhibitions of their gallery artists. Valérie Blass presents new sculptures and photographs that explore intersections between three-dimensional object and image. Her works shift our recognition through assemblage and theatrical staging. Like the black curtain that conceals a backstage, Blass provides hints at mechanisms of interchangeability.