nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens April 11:

Submerged Motherlands
 Swoon
 
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYC

Brooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago.

photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq

Fri, Feb 21, 3p:“Theodore’s Drawing Salon” by Ted Barrow, curated by Alise Tifentale Engineer’s Office Gallery, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, NYC (bt 48th and 49th St)These Drawing Salons began with a fascination of 19th century parlor culture combined with an innocuous and particular pleasure taken from drawing with friends. The project will involve a group of artists meeting at the Engineer’s Office Gallery, touring the galleries of Christie’s and drawing a selected group of objects or images on auction, then installing their renditions of these images in the space provided. The drawings, once installed, can be photographed and documented however each artist wants, but left in the space with the understanding that they will likely be taken down and destroyed by a third party. Although the format and size of the paper will not be regulated, ink drawings are a must. Theodore’s Drawing Salon is an attempt to reflect on the seemingly victorious digitalization of the present-day culture. As a comment to the era of easily accessible tools of digital image-making and platforms for image-sharing, the Salon proposes an explicitly analog image-making and image-sharing environment. Yet the Salon will have its online presence and the team will happily engage in discussion and dissemination of the drawings.pictured: William-Adolphe Bouguereau, The Oreads, 1902

Fri, Feb 21, 3p:

Theodore’s Drawing Salon
 by Ted Barrow, curated by Alise Tifentale
 
Engineer’s Office Gallery, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, NYC (bt 48th and 49th St)

These Drawing Salons began with a fascination of 19th century parlor culture combined with an innocuous and particular pleasure taken from drawing with friends. The project will involve a group of artists meeting at the Engineer’s Office Gallery, touring the galleries of Christie’s and drawing a selected group of objects or images on auction, then installing their renditions of these images in the space provided. The drawings, once installed, can be photographed and documented however each artist wants, but left in the space with the understanding that they will likely be taken down and destroyed by a third party. Although the format and size of the paper will not be regulated, ink drawings are a must. Theodore’s Drawing Salon is an attempt to reflect on the seemingly victorious digitalization of the present-day culture. As a comment to the era of easily accessible tools of digital image-making and platforms for image-sharing, the Salon proposes an explicitly analog image-making and image-sharing environment. Yet the Salon will have its online presence and the team will happily engage in discussion and dissemination of the drawings.

pictured: William-Adolphe Bouguereau, The Oreads, 1902

thru Feb 16:

PULP
 Anastasia Zielinski, Clive Murphy, Michael Leavitt
 
Lorimoto Gallery, 16-23 Hancock St., Brooklyn, NYC
Hours: Saturday & Sunday 1- 6pm [MAP]

exhibition of work by 3 artist working with various types of paper.

opens Tomorrow Thurs, Sept 12, 6-8p:“How to Disappear Completely” Brian Adam DouglasAndrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)solo exhibition of collages and drawings. Brian Adam Douglas is known for his work on the streets of New York City under the moniker Élböw Töe. Virtually all of the works in Douglas’ new series deal with the rebuilding of life and purpose in the wake of catastrophic deconstruction brought on by natural disasters and climate change. They are not merely about the breaking down of things but about an innate capacity to cope with disaster and the rehabilitation of purpose. Spending up to half a year on a single piece, Douglas’ laborious process demands a pictorial integrity where nothing is wasted and everything serves his intensity of purpose. Forgoing the relative ease and fluidity of the brush stroke, the artist methodically builds his compositions through shards of color incised from sheets of paper he has painted, forging a novel way to combine painting and collage into a singular hybrid. - thru Oct 26

opens Tomorrow Thurs, Sept 12, 6-8p:

How to Disappear Completely
 Brian Adam Douglas

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)

solo exhibition of collages and drawings. Brian Adam Douglas is known for his work on the streets of New York City under the moniker Élböw Töe. Virtually all of the works in Douglas’ new series deal with the rebuilding of life and purpose in the wake of catastrophic deconstruction brought on by natural disasters and climate change. They are not merely about the breaking down of things but about an innate capacity to cope with disaster and the rehabilitation of purpose. Spending up to half a year on a single piece, Douglas’ laborious process demands a pictorial integrity where nothing is wasted and everything serves his intensity of purpose. Forgoing the relative ease and fluidity of the brush stroke, the artist methodically builds his compositions through shards of color incised from sheets of paper he has painted, forging a novel way to combine painting and collage into a singular hybrid. - thru Oct 26

opens Sept 6, 6-8p:“Money, Power, Sex & Mark Wagner” Mark Wagner  Pavel Zoubok Gallery, 531 W26th St., NYCan exhibition of collage works made from currency by Brooklyn based artist, and co-founder of Booklyn Artists Alliance, Mark Wagner. “The one dollar bill is the most ubiquitous piece of paper in America. Collage asks the question: what might be done to make it something else? It is a ripe material: intaglio printed on sturdy linen stock, covered in decorative filigree, and steeped in symbolism and concept. Blade and glue transform it-reproducing the effects of tapestries, paints, engravings, mosaics, and computers—striving for something bizarre, beautiful, or unbelievable… the foreign in the familiar.” - Mark Wagner

opens Sept 6, 6-8p:

Money, Power, Sex & Mark Wagner
 Mark Wagner  

Pavel Zoubok Gallery, 531 W26th St., NYC

an exhibition of collage works made from currency by Brooklyn based artist, and co-founder of Booklyn Artists Alliance, Mark Wagner.

“The one dollar bill is the most ubiquitous piece of paper in America. Collage asks the question: what might be done to make it something else? It is a ripe material: intaglio printed on sturdy linen stock, covered in decorative filigree, and steeped in symbolism and concept. Blade and glue transform it-reproducing the effects of tapestries, paints, engravings, mosaics, and computers—striving for something bizarre, beautiful, or unbelievable… the foreign in the familiar.” - Mark Wagner

Just Opened “Cut Up”artists: Myles Bennett, Susan Bricker, Andrea Burgay, Steven Charles, Paul D’Agostino, Jackie Hoving, Ken Kocses, Elissa Levy, Gelah Penn, Casey Ruble, and Mary SchiliroStorefront Bushwick, 16 Wilson St., Brooklyn, NY11 artists who shred, chop, clip, paste, and otherwise reconfigure a variety of materials to make collages, sculptures, and paintings. Their practice is protean and energetic, and the results are surprising, humorous, and poignant. The show aims to showcase a broad range of “attacks” on the art object, its surface, and its content. The fractured nature of identity is a subtext. Things are not what they seem. - thru Aug 5

Just Opened

Cut Up
artists: Myles Bennett, Susan Bricker, Andrea Burgay, Steven Charles, Paul D’Agostino, Jackie Hoving, Ken Kocses, Elissa Levy, Gelah Penn, Casey Ruble, and Mary Schiliro

Storefront Bushwick, 16 Wilson St., Brooklyn, NY

11 artists who shred, chop, clip, paste, and otherwise reconfigure a variety of materials to make collages, sculptures, and paintings. Their practice is protean and energetic, and the results are surprising, humorous, and poignant. The show aims to showcase a broad range of “attacks” on the art object, its surface, and its content. The fractured nature of identity is a subtext. Things are not what they seem. - thru Aug 5

Extended thru July 15 “A Cut Above: 12 Paper Masters”Christopher Henry Gallery, 127 Elizabeth St., NYC"The Christopher Henry Gallery’s current exhibition, A Cut Above: 12 Paper Masters, gives a whole new meaning to the term “paper cut.” Paying homage to a dozen artists who use razor-sharp blades as their central tool, this Diana Ewer-curated showcase celebrates not only a growing trend, but also the delicate craftsmanship of each talent behind the fragile works on view.” - ARTLOG

Extended thru July 15 

A Cut Above: 12 Paper Masters

Christopher Henry Gallery, 127 Elizabeth St., NYC

"The Christopher Henry Gallery’s current exhibition, A Cut Above: 12 Paper Masters, gives a whole new meaning to the term “paper cut.” Paying homage to a dozen artists who use razor-sharp blades as their central tool, this Diana Ewer-curated showcase celebrates not only a growing trend, but also the delicate craftsmanship of each talent behind the fragile works on view.” - ARTLOG

Opens Tonight, May 29, 6-8p:

Material → Object
 Gao Rong, Li Hongbo, Li Hongjun, Wang Liwei, Wang Lei, & Ye Sen

Eli Klein Fine Art, 462 W Broadway, NYC (bt Prince and Houston)

Six artists work with various media such as paper, cloth, wood, and leather, and employ techniques that allow them to explore the possibilities of their craft, giving traditional handicrafts a new level of artistic value. Rediscovering neglected objects, questioning reverence for history and tradition, and contesting society’s restrictions on thinking, Material → Object examines Chinese societal issues through the reconceptualization of chosen techniques. Although they start from individual points of investigation, remembrance, and self-expression, the artists all use their unique artistic process to reimagine contemporary China. - thru July 19

Opens Wed, May 16, 5-8p:”Enshrouded” Lin YanCheryl McGinnis Gallery, 466 Washington St., NYCWithout use of a brush, Yan’s rich palette of natural and ink-soaked Xuan paper fibers are cast and layered into minimalist reliefs of architectural elements from her surroundings and, most recently, from Chinese folk imagery. Simultaneously abstract and figurative, these tactile fragments of everyday life flow with emotional organic compositions that counter the geometric structures usually associated with buildings as she reflects the continuing struggle between nature and global industrialism. - thru June 16

Opens Wed, May 16, 5-8p:

Enshrouded
 Lin Yan

Cheryl McGinnis Gallery, 466 Washington St., NYC

Without use of a brush, Yan’s rich palette of natural and ink-soaked Xuan paper fibers are cast and layered into minimalist reliefs of architectural elements from her surroundings and, most recently, from Chinese folk imagery. Simultaneously abstract and figurative, these tactile fragments of everyday life flow with emotional organic compositions that counter the geometric structures usually associated with buildings as she reflects the continuing struggle between nature and global industrialism. - thru June 16

Opens Tomorrow, Jan 5, 6-8p: Jennifer Poon”Strange Blooms”Claire Oliver Gallery, 513 W26th St., NYC"Jennifer Poon’s lyrical and confident paint conveys the fragile nature of and the sensitive balance between our physical and spiritual selves. Conducted with a delicate hand, her dark, heavy subject matter becomes tractable enough for us to approach it, reflect on it, and digest its message. Poon’s solo exhibition “Strange Blooms” creates a provocative dialogue by juxtaposing her meticulous watercolors with her obsessively crafted fabric sculptures. Mining the relatable from both human and animal subjects, Poon’s studio practice is at once intellectual and emotional; she maximizes the feminine nature of her media while allowing it to express compelling and bleak themes. The Artist’s cut and sewn paper, gouache, and watercolor along with her densely stitched, stained, and sculpted fabrics entice the viewer’s enamored gaze." -thru Feb 11

Opens Tomorrow, Jan 5, 6-8p:

 Jennifer Poon
Strange Blooms

Claire Oliver Gallery
, 513 W26th St., NYC

"Jennifer Poon’s lyrical and confident paint conveys the fragile nature of and the sensitive balance between our physical and spiritual selves. Conducted with a delicate hand, her dark, heavy subject matter becomes tractable enough for us to approach it, reflect on it, and digest its message. Poon’s solo exhibition “Strange Blooms” creates a provocative dialogue by juxtaposing her meticulous watercolors with her obsessively crafted fabric sculptures. Mining the relatable from both human and animal subjects, Poon’s studio practice is at once intellectual and emotional; she maximizes the feminine nature of her media while allowing it to express compelling and bleak themes. The Artist’s cut and sewn paper, gouache, and watercolor along with her densely stitched, stained, and sculpted fabrics entice the viewer’s enamored gaze." -thru Feb 11