nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

recommended:“the second life of flowers” Sirikul Pattachote The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYCfirst New York gallery exhibition of Thailand born painter Sirikul Pattachote. “The brittle decomposition of a flower at the end of its purpose is a slow and lonely, bittersweet journey. We can use words like this to describe the action because it is so familiar to our own human experience. Just as the flower serves its purpose we serve ours, we both flourish in the sunshine and grow uniquely beautiful before we leave our legacy and drop our petals along the path to becoming a memory. The ephemeral quality of life and matter is a central theme in Pattachote’s work. Through her paintings, she attempts to record and preserve certain memories and impressions that highlight the potential good that lies in everyone and everything.” - thru Aug 7

recommended:

the second life of flowers
 Sirikul Pattachote
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC

first New York gallery exhibition of Thailand born painter Sirikul Pattachote. “The brittle decomposition of a flower at the end of its purpose is a slow and lonely, bittersweet journey. We can use words like this to describe the action because it is so familiar to our own human experience. Just as the flower serves its purpose we serve ours, we both flourish in the sunshine and grow uniquely beautiful before we leave our legacy and drop our petals along the path to becoming a memory. The ephemeral quality of life and matter is a central theme in Pattachote’s work. Through her paintings, she attempts to record and preserve certain memories and impressions that highlight the potential good that lies in everyone and everything.” - thru Aug 7

newly opened:

All this happened, more or less
 Elizabeth Glaessner
 
P.P.O.W Gallery, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)

Glaessner combines familiar objects with misunderstood and idiosyncratic portraits, often laden with humor that counterpoint her macabre imagery. An exploration of memory, personal history and ritual, Glaessner’s work questions the way in which we relate to and envision our past. Her most recent paintings depict a highly detailed mythology of post-human existence on earth that features anthropomorphic, gelatinous figures in familiar, yet toxic, landscapes. These organic creatures appear as if born from natural forms, like tree trunks and rock formations, in attempt to reconstruct lost histories through the detritus left behind. - thru Aug 15

opens Fri, June 27, 6-8p:“Some Thoughts About Marks” Theodora Allen, Patrick Berran, Daniel Heidkamp, Michael Hunter, Lui Shtini Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYCa group exhibition featuring the work of five young painters working in New York and Los Angeles.pictured: Lui Shtini, Tule, 2014, Oil on board

opens Fri, June 27, 6-8p:

Some Thoughts About Marks
 Theodora Allen, Patrick Berran, Daniel Heidkamp,
 Michael Hunter, Lui Shtini
 
Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

a group exhibition featuring the work of five young painters working in New York and Los Angeles.

pictured: Lui Shtini, Tule, 2014, Oil on board

opens tomorrow, June 19, 6-8p:“Begotten, Not Made” Nicola Samori Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYCMore than a trick of the eye, Samori’s paintings treat their surface as a material skin transcribing the memory of their process. “Like the eye adjusting to darkness, adaptation is necessary upon entering Samori’s visual cosmos. The images stare at us in an effort of denied vision. With the icy gaze of a femme fatale warning us that she is beyond our reach, they block our penetration. The images feel us, smell us, judge us. They are watching, but they don’t see. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. And we see through a glass, darkly. Sometimes peering in, other times peeling back in search of the surface beneath the surface beneath the surface.”

opens tomorrow, June 19, 6-8p:

Begotten, Not Made
 Nicola Samori
 
Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYC

More than a trick of the eye, Samori’s paintings treat their surface as a material skin transcribing the memory of their process. “Like the eye adjusting to darkness, adaptation is necessary upon entering Samori’s visual cosmos. The images stare at us in an effort of denied vision. With the icy gaze of a femme fatale warning us that she is beyond our reach, they block our penetration. The images feel us, smell us, judge us. They are watching, but they don’t see. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. And we see through a glass, darkly. Sometimes peering in, other times peeling back in search of the surface beneath the surface beneath the surface.”

opens tomorrow, June 5, 6-8p:

paintingassupermodel
 Franklin Evans
 
Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYC

Evans presents a new installation comprised of wall painting/collages, eight large paintings, 1,500 square feet of digital prints on paper/canvas/silk, photographic sculptures, floor works, and sculpture vitrines that alter the architecture of the gallery.

thru Sept 7:

13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair

Queens Museum, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY

The exhibition takes Warhol’s 13 Most Wanted Men as its single subject, addressing its creation and destruction and placing it in its artistic and social context by combining art, documentation, and archival material. 50 years have passed since an up-and-coming Pop provocateur named Andy Warhol sparked a minor scandal at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. As part of a prominent set of public commissions for the Philip Johnson-designed New York State Pavilion’s exterior, Warhol chose to enlarge mug shots from a NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Forming a chessboard of front and profile views, 13 Most Wanted Men was installed by April 15, 1964, and painted over by Fair officials’ direction with silver paint a few days later.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:“Figure Studies” Walter RobinsonLynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYCKnown for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:

Figure Studies
 Walter Robinson

Lynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYC

Known for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Fri, May 23, 6-8p:

Geo Land
 Alain Biltereyst
 
Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

Belgium-based painter Alain Biltereyst’s small works on plywood are concerned with everyday, contemporary life. The artist is inspired by geometric forms that he sees on a daily basis, such as logos on currency, advertising on the sides of trucks, and fences against a landscape. He strives to interpret this ‘Geo Land’ into works that are “as simple and poetic as possible.” Formal repetition and color choices reflect the artist’s background in graphic design and fascination with commercial and other urban signs, where the lines between culture and subculture are blurred. Beneath the hard edge geometry of each composition, lies a painterly gesture, implying a depth in the otherwise flat composition. - thru June 22

opens tomorrow, Fri, May 16, 7-9p:

MARGINS
 Frank Webster
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC (bt Delancey & Broome)

Webster’s paintings depict post-industrial landscapes drawing on the aesthetic traditions of minimalism and realism. Summoning a sense of apocalyptic abandonedness, Webster’s compositions pair high-rise buildings with similarly scaled trees, liken barbed-wire fences and electrical wires to the creeping vines that entwine them, and present an urban ecosystem curiously devoid of inhabitants. - thru June 1

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:“Rx for Viewing” Grant Foster / Jesse Wine Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYCa two-person exhibition that brings together the work of London-based artists Grant Foster and Jesse Wine, artists that eschew the contemporary preference toward multi-media and mixed media works. Foster and Wine work unabashedly in one medium: painting and ceramics, respectively. The palpable humor of the works on view, alternatingly mischievous and dark, suggests ambivalence toward contemporary culture, its feigned invocations of morality and the cookie-cutter mentality of digital reproductions. But despite the tone of satire, the works are richly textured, executed delicately, and, ultimately, with a distinct tenderness toward their subject matter.- thru June 9

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:

Rx for Viewing
 Grant Foster / Jesse Wine
 
Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYC

a two-person exhibition that brings together the work of London-based artists Grant Foster and Jesse Wine, artists that eschew the contemporary preference toward multi-media and mixed media works. Foster and Wine work unabashedly in one medium: painting and ceramics, respectively. The palpable humor of the works on view, alternatingly mischievous and dark, suggests ambivalence toward contemporary culture, its feigned invocations of morality and the cookie-cutter mentality of digital reproductions. But despite the tone of satire, the works are richly textured, executed delicately, and, ultimately, with a distinct tenderness toward their subject matter.- thru June 9