nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens Thurs, Oct 16, 6-8p:“Likelihood of Confusion” Alfred Steiner Joshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St, NYCfeaturing twelve works of watercolor on paper, two oil on medium-density fiberboard, as well as a new piece from Steiner’s “Anti-Paparazzi” series, Steiner reflects on the pervasive nature of media and advertising. Extending his project of reconstructing pre-existing graphic forms from carefully rendered naturalistic images, Steiner tackles trademarks, service marks, logos, and other indicia of origin. To do this, Steiner considers the idiosyncratic contours comprising these marks and, using techniques of free association, replaces each contour with a similarly shaped image. The show’s title, Likelihood of Confusion, takes its name from the legal standard for determining trademark infringement. - thru Nov 15

Opens Thurs, Oct 16, 6-8p:

Likelihood of Confusion
 Alfred Steiner
 
Joshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St, NYC

featuring twelve works of watercolor on paper, two oil on medium-density fiberboard, as well as a new piece from Steiner’s “Anti-Paparazzi” series, Steiner reflects on the pervasive nature of media and advertising. Extending his project of reconstructing pre-existing graphic forms from carefully rendered naturalistic images, Steiner tackles trademarks, service marks, logos, and other indicia of origin. To do this, Steiner considers the idiosyncratic contours comprising these marks and, using techniques of free association, replaces each contour with a similarly shaped image. The show’s title, Likelihood of Confusion, takes its name from the legal standard for determining trademark infringement. - thru Nov 15

Opens Thurs, Oct 16, 6-8p:“Qualia” Tiffany Bozic Joshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St, NYCBozic explores the notion of how we perceive information and experience the world around us. “I call this show Qualia,” says Bozic, “which refers to individual subjective properties of our own conscious experiences. The way you experience the color blue will be different from how another person experiences it. We will never know what it feels like for a fish to swim, or a bird to fly. It is impossible to know what subjective experiences another person or species is having. I find it fascinating that we co-exist on this planet with millions of other living beings, and that we understand little of how they see, feel, and experience the world in their own consciousness.” - thru Nov 15

Opens Thurs, Oct 16, 6-8p:

Qualia
 Tiffany Bozic
 
Joshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St, NYC

Bozic explores the notion of how we perceive information and experience the world around us. “I call this show Qualia,” says Bozic, “which refers to individual subjective properties of our own conscious experiences. The way you experience the color blue will be different from how another person experiences it. We will never know what it feels like for a fish to swim, or a bird to fly. It is impossible to know what subjective experiences another person or species is having. I find it fascinating that we co-exist on this planet with millions of other living beings, and that we understand little of how they see, feel, and experience the world in their own consciousness.” - thru Nov 15

Opens tonight, Oct 9, 6-8p:“A Revision” John Henderson Galerie Perrotin, 909 Madison Ave, NYC (at 73rd St)a collection of new works by Henderson which continues to expand and develop his engagement with abstract painting and the conditions for its contemporary practice. Making use of a variety of technologies and techniques—molds, castings, digital printing, video, and photography—Henderson reforms, revises, and reproduces the manual painterly expression, invoking Minimalism and Abstract Expressionism while acknowledging a distance from their unmediated practice. - thru Nov 15

Opens tonight, Oct 9, 6-8p:

A Revision
 John Henderson
 
Galerie Perrotin, 909 Madison Ave, NYC (at 73rd St)

a collection of new works by Henderson which continues to expand and develop his engagement with abstract painting and the conditions for its contemporary practice. Making use of a variety of technologies and techniques—molds, castings, digital printing, video, and photography—Henderson reforms, revises, and reproduces the manual painterly expression, invoking Minimalism and Abstract Expressionism while acknowledging a distance from their unmediated practice. - thru Nov 15

thru Oct 26:

Samuel T. Adams, Patrick Brennan, Nicole Cherubini & Cassandra MacLeod

Fitzroy Gallery, 195 Chrystie St., NYC

Each of the artists in the exhibition employs a practice that results in a juxtaposition of the rigid and the baroque through a layering of form, material and technique. Samuel T. Adams relies on a cyclical process of construction and deconstruction. Nicole Cherubini‘s sculptures are lavish in texture yet minimalist in form. Patrick Brennan uses oil, acrylic, popsicle sticks, paper, and other collaged elements to create intricate and dense compositions. Cassandra MacLeod’s repetition of images—ropes, coyotes, cacti, and other—are recognizable and definable yet often dissolve into a stratum of color, abstraction and extruded shapes through painterly and printmaking techniques.

Fall 2014 Editors Pick
just opened:

Taxonomy
 George Boorujy

The Arsenal Gallery, Central Park, NYC
(830 Fifth Avenue at 64th Street, Third Floor)

a collection of George Boorujy’s dynamic large-scale paintings of North American animals with disarmingly human characteristics, as well as a series of his preliminary clay models and drawings. Boorujy’s hyperrealistic drawings recall the scientific detail of James John Audubon; however he takes liberties with the composition of his subjects, which adds a surrealistic element to his work. He begins his process by creating clay models to achieve slightly fantastic compositions unseen in nature, but that at the same time seem plausible. His extremely detailed portraits are rendered in ink on white paper backgrounds and can measure up to eleven feet long. The scale, meticulous craftsmanship and limited context encourage viewers to pause and see the animals as they never have before. - thru Oct 25

Artist Talk: October 13, 6pm

read our 2012 interview with George Boorujy HERE

Opens tonight, Sept 4, 6-8p:“Jennifer Reeves (1963-2014) Memorial Exhibition” BravinLee programs, 526 W26th St., NYC (#211)“We share the grief of Jennifer’s many friends, family and admirers. Jennifer’s paintings, photographs and prose will live on. For those of us who knew her she will be remembered for her loveable genius, her startling candor and her unguarded kindness. All who had the privilege of knowing her images and words will miss sensing that she is around and about to tell us something we will be much richer, inwardly, for hearing.”Artists, in particular, battle inertia in a specific way because the very act of making art is an act of defiance against despair. I think most art is about this battle - how to win it, what it looks like when you don’t, and what it looks like if you do.—Jennifer Reeves Oct. 4 2010A memorial service celebrating Jennifer’s life will be held at 11:00 A.M. September 6 at St. Mark’s Church 131 East 10th St. NYC.pictured: Socrates and Hemlock, 2014, acrylic and collage on panel, 24 x 18 inches

Opens tonight, Sept 4, 6-8p:

Jennifer Reeves (1963-2014) Memorial Exhibition
 
BravinLee programs, 526 W26th St., NYC (#211)

“We share the grief of Jennifer’s many friends, family and admirers. Jennifer’s paintings, photographs and prose will live on. For those of us who knew her she will be remembered for her loveable genius, her startling candor and her unguarded kindness. All who had the privilege of knowing her images and words will miss sensing that she is around and about to tell us something we will be much richer, inwardly, for hearing.”

Artists, in particular, battle inertia in a specific way because the very act of making art is an act of defiance against despair. I think most art is about this battle - how to win it, what it looks like when you don’t, and what it looks like if you do.
—Jennifer Reeves Oct. 4 2010

A memorial service celebrating Jennifer’s life will be held at 11:00 A.M. September 6 at St. Mark’s Church 131 East 10th St. NYC.

pictured: Socrates and Hemlock, 2014, acrylic and collage on panel, 24 x 18 inches

nycARTscene Interview: Tara de la Garza

Arthur Seen recently interviewed artist Tara de la Garza. Her exhibition, Embracing Failure, opens Thursday, August 28th at The Lodge Gallery and runs through August 31st.

1/ Your new show is called Embracing Failure, do you think of yourself as a failure?

I think every artist has an inner critic and it depends on what day as to where you see yourself on the success spectrum. Creating art has been the hardest thing I have ever done. I think most people have this image of an artist in a field with a watercolor palette, happily humming away, creating. In reality, to create something meaningful, that will hopefully forward the dialogue of art, is a struggle. By embracing failure I am open to seeing where an artwork evolves before I discount it. I am revisiting, (uncrumpling!) trashed work and editing, much like a writer or a musician would do. Creating art is a beautiful thing because if allows you time to wander, but that time can also be filled with self doubt. Especially making marks on paper, you can’t hide. You rush in and then backtrack to make it up. It’s the human bloody condition on paper!

2/ The works on paper you are referring to are the LES series which incorporate multiple mediums and themes, can you tell us about them?

Originally I created these for a large scale mural project in the Lower East Side that wasn’t completed (the first failure) but I didn’t want to abandon them, I thought I could rework them and see what happened. I grabbed a big brush and some white paint and liberated them. Each piece is a journey, they are hard to take in all at once, you go down avenues and I think the change in medium helps facilitate that.

I have included lots of vignettes of New York in this work, they are full of stories of the Lower East Side where I lived and had a studio and fell in love. They also include my influences and fellow artists works, for example ABC NO Rio 2 depicts, in part, a street art piece by painter Tom Sanford, who I thought so generous to toil for many days on a transitory work, I wanted to recognize that… I was also tempted to steal one!

3/ How does being Australian inform your work?

What, because I mentioned stealing! One thing I realized about Australians is that it is ingrained in our culture to break rules, we encourage the larrakin, a term that is synonymous with being mischievous. This manifests in my work in numerous ways, one example is in the use of materials such as watercolor. Purists of the medium frown on the use of white paint. So I ‘cheat’ and paint over mistakes, then I regret it and try and make it up. That’s my process, intrigue and deception!. And paper is great, you can’t lie, you see every mark and that is the joy of making and owning art, seeing the hand and shaky heart of the artist.

Also part of the rule breaking is a dialogue I have been having for awhile now with Sol LeWitt. I was in a show at MOCA Massachusetts curated by Regina Basha with a piece called Messing with Sol where I distorted some of his work. I admire artists who have a clear framework, but I also want to tear frameworks down. I came back to his guidelines for this series to help gain some cohesion in the work, or in some ways legitimize it, back to that inner critic!

4/ If not humor, per se, there seems to be a lot of tongue in cheek in your work. Massaging a dead chicken for example…

The funny thing about that piece is that it was picked up by comedy central’s Tosh.0, they made fun of it without somehow realizing that is what I was doing, but hey, it made me ‘internet famous’! I like the idea that subtle change and humor can be more affective than grand gestures. That piece was talking about the practice of selling live chickens in Harlem in a place next door to the space that Chashama made available for the show. Working in a public space is great as you can really have a dialogue with a neighborhood, I confused a lot of people by displaying a chicken being massaged in the window right next door. It was playing with opposites, the antithesis of the life of those chickens, but also ridiculous because it was already dead. It wasn’t a political statement about the plight of the live chickens. None of my work is overtly political, it feels inauthentic to me if I attempt it. I think growing up poor informs you in a different way, I don’t have the guilt of privilege that can lead some artists down a righteous path. I am happy to observe my life and talk about it (even make fun of it) without needing a purpose, that seems very Seinfeld somehow…  

I think what is really impactful is changing the way people view things. Technology has done that. It doesn’t dwell on the sociopolitical spectrum. I want to be more like a technologist a or an engineer, not an activist. All I have to contribute are my own thoughts and ideas which aren’t anything controversial or even interesting but there is a curiosity in the mundane, the slightly off kilter, the in-between that fascinates.

5/ Your Projection Paintings use a technique I have never seen before, can you tell us about it?

It’s strange that this technique wasn’t being used in Lumiere’s day, it is actually quite low tech. A movie is projected onto a canvas and the paused movie scene is painted on the canvas. When exhibiting the movie plays and matches up with the canvas, it causes a strange relationship with space, it activates the painting, in a way that a static painting cannot. For the implosion movie this was particularly dramatic when the movie meets the falling building.

6/ Most of the works have some kind of reference materials, images that you cut and paste together to form a narrative. How important is that process and the technology you use?

My first profession was as a graphic designer and the tools available through photoshop are powerful to sketch ideas that would have been difficult to visualize in any other way. Even photographing the work and viewing it from that critical viewpoint is helpful to gain perspective. Working with a facsimile can also be liberating in a way. You can move far away from the original and yet keep coming back to it when you get lost, it acts as a security. Just starting with a blank canvas is terrifying.

Tara de la Garza: taradelagarza.com

The Lodge Gallery: thelodgegallery.com 131 Chrystie St., NYC

recommended:“the second life of flowers” Sirikul Pattachote The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYCfirst New York gallery exhibition of Thailand born painter Sirikul Pattachote. “The brittle decomposition of a flower at the end of its purpose is a slow and lonely, bittersweet journey. We can use words like this to describe the action because it is so familiar to our own human experience. Just as the flower serves its purpose we serve ours, we both flourish in the sunshine and grow uniquely beautiful before we leave our legacy and drop our petals along the path to becoming a memory. The ephemeral quality of life and matter is a central theme in Pattachote’s work. Through her paintings, she attempts to record and preserve certain memories and impressions that highlight the potential good that lies in everyone and everything.” - thru Aug 7

recommended:

the second life of flowers
 Sirikul Pattachote
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC

first New York gallery exhibition of Thailand born painter Sirikul Pattachote. “The brittle decomposition of a flower at the end of its purpose is a slow and lonely, bittersweet journey. We can use words like this to describe the action because it is so familiar to our own human experience. Just as the flower serves its purpose we serve ours, we both flourish in the sunshine and grow uniquely beautiful before we leave our legacy and drop our petals along the path to becoming a memory. The ephemeral quality of life and matter is a central theme in Pattachote’s work. Through her paintings, she attempts to record and preserve certain memories and impressions that highlight the potential good that lies in everyone and everything.” - thru Aug 7

newly opened:

All this happened, more or less
 Elizabeth Glaessner
 
P.P.O.W Gallery, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)

Glaessner combines familiar objects with misunderstood and idiosyncratic portraits, often laden with humor that counterpoint her macabre imagery. An exploration of memory, personal history and ritual, Glaessner’s work questions the way in which we relate to and envision our past. Her most recent paintings depict a highly detailed mythology of post-human existence on earth that features anthropomorphic, gelatinous figures in familiar, yet toxic, landscapes. These organic creatures appear as if born from natural forms, like tree trunks and rock formations, in attempt to reconstruct lost histories through the detritus left behind. - thru Aug 15

opens Fri, June 27, 6-8p:“Some Thoughts About Marks” Theodora Allen, Patrick Berran, Daniel Heidkamp, Michael Hunter, Lui Shtini Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYCa group exhibition featuring the work of five young painters working in New York and Los Angeles.pictured: Lui Shtini, Tule, 2014, Oil on board

opens Fri, June 27, 6-8p:

Some Thoughts About Marks
 Theodora Allen, Patrick Berran, Daniel Heidkamp,
 Michael Hunter, Lui Shtini
 
Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

a group exhibition featuring the work of five young painters working in New York and Los Angeles.

pictured: Lui Shtini, Tule, 2014, Oil on board