nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

opens Fri, June 27, 6-8p:“Some Thoughts About Marks” Theodora Allen, Patrick Berran, Daniel Heidkamp, Michael Hunter, Lui Shtini Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYCa group exhibition featuring the work of five young painters working in New York and Los Angeles.pictured: Lui Shtini, Tule, 2014, Oil on board

opens Fri, June 27, 6-8p:

Some Thoughts About Marks
 Theodora Allen, Patrick Berran, Daniel Heidkamp,
 Michael Hunter, Lui Shtini
 
Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

a group exhibition featuring the work of five young painters working in New York and Los Angeles.

pictured: Lui Shtini, Tule, 2014, Oil on board

artwork focus:

El Diablo
 Ryan Schneider

currently on view in “Ritual for Letting Go” at:
Two Rams Gallery, 215 Bowery, NYC (entrance on Rivington)

84”x72”, oil on canvas, 2014

“El Diablo (pictured, top) began as an attempt to paint a giant ceramic bowl on a beach. Hopefully one day I will be able to pull that motif off, but in this instance, I was not. I worked on this big bowl with little crabs crawling all around it for about a day until I realized it was hopeless. This was not going to work- so I turned it around to face the wall and got really annoyed about the whole thing. Another giant canvas I was going to have to take off the stretcher, then stretch and gesso another one. It always breaks my heart a little when I can’t get it on the first try- but of course it happens all the time.

The next day I went to Pearl in the morning. I thought, ok, if I’m going to re-stretch this one and start over, then I’m going to get some really bright colors. I bought a bunch of nice paints- with a lot of very bright colors I hadn’t tried before- in particular an amazing orange I was really excited about. I also got some canvas.

When I got to the studio, I turned the canvas back around and studied it. What exactly was going on here? What did I see? I turned the canvas from horizontal to vertical (it’s 7x6 ft), and something clicked. That big bowl shape could be something else. Everything around the bowl (palms, crabs, clouds) was kind of working now that it was vertical, but the bowl had to transform. But into what? I immediately saw an owl- I kind of wanted to paint a big owl. But hadn’t I recently read some article somewhere about how owls were going to be really cool to paint this year, like cats were last year? Well then I’m definitely not painting an owl today. What else do I see? I saw a big mask. I’ve always wanted to paint a mask but felt like I shouldn’t because many artists before me have painted them. But I could really see it. This was going to have to be a big mask, and if it didn’t work, oh well.

I had to scrape away a lot of the wet paint that was there from the day before. Then I could almost immediately see where everything was going to go. I sketched it in- starting with the eyes and nose, naturally. Then I just started filling in big areas with color, beginning with orange. It was the most amazing orange I had ever seen, and I know that what goes really well with orange is turquoise, so I filled an area in with turquoise. Really quickly the mask took shape with bright wet paint, and looked really at home with the foliage and crabs all around it, even though they were sideways. I just left them as they were. Everything just kind of solidified.

It was a mask just floating there in the night. I was really attracted to it- it didn’t matter to me that it made no sense floating there. I imagined if I was walking on a tropical beach at night, the smells, the sounds of the waves and foliage blowing, and I happened upon this big mask floating in front of me. The mask was scary, but welcoming, and I was attracted to that. I added some stars in the sky and other details but wanted to keep it simple. By the night time I was finished. It almost felt as though it had painted itself.” -Ryan Schneider

Opens Nov 6th, 6-8p:“Painting 101” Francesca Dimattio, Dennis Hollingsworth,  Jonathan Lasker, Daniel Rios Rodriguez, Sandi SloneSargent’s Daughters Gallery, 179 East Broadway, NYCinaugural exhibition at Sargent’s Daughters, the new gallery venture by Allegra LaViola and Meredith Rosen (former director of BravinLee programs) in Allegra LaViola’s former location.The five artists in Painting 101 “speak in paint and communicate with brushstroke, color, collage and layer.”

Opens Nov 6th, 6-8p:

Painting 101
 Francesca Dimattio, Dennis Hollingsworth,
 Jonathan Lasker, Daniel Rios Rodriguez, Sandi Slone

Sargent’s Daughters Gallery, 179 East Broadway, NYC

inaugural exhibition at Sargent’s Daughters, the new gallery venture by Allegra LaViola and Meredith Rosen (former director of BravinLee programs) in Allegra LaViola’s former location.

The five artists in Painting 101 “speak in paint and communicate with brushstroke, color, collage and layer.”

video:

NY-based artist Jenny Morgan talks about her artistic practices and the body of work currently on view at Driscoll Babcock Gallery (525 W25th St., NYC). Her exhibition, “How To Find A Ghost,” recently opened and runs through Nov 23.  jennymorganart.tumblr.com

opens Sept 11:Ashley Bickerton Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie St., NYC (near Delancey)Ashley Bickerton’s upcoming exhibition features a combination of multi-media work ranging from figuration to pure abstraction that combine painting, sculpture and photography. For decades, Bickerton has experimented with the nature of these three disciplines, striving to find a perfect harmony that manifests in both the two and three dimensions. - thru Oct 16

opens Sept 11:

Ashley Bickerton

Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie St., NYC (near Delancey)

Ashley Bickerton’s upcoming exhibition features a combination of multi-media work ranging from figuration to pure abstraction that combine painting, sculpture and photography. For decades, Bickerton has experimented with the nature of these three disciplines, striving to find a perfect harmony that manifests in both the two and three dimensions. - thru Oct 16

Opens Tonight, Oct 18, 6-8p: “What Goes Without Saying” Hank Willis ThomasJack Shainman Gallery, 513 W20th St., NYCshow includes photographs, sculpture, painting and new media, all which delve into the construction of mythologies embedded in popular culture. Known for his innovative use of advertising, a globally ubiquitous language, Thomas builds complex narratives about history, identity and race. This show brings together several facets of Thomas’ practice to explore objects and language, torn from their history, brought to our present, and repurposed to reveal the process of their agency. - thru Nov 17

Opens Tonight, Oct 18, 6-8p:

What Goes Without Saying
 Hank Willis Thomas

Jack Shainman Gallery, 513 W20th St., NYC

show includes photographs, sculpture, painting and new media, all which delve into the construction of mythologies embedded in popular culture. Known for his innovative use of advertising, a globally ubiquitous language, Thomas builds complex narratives about history, identity and race. This show brings together several facets of Thomas’ practice to explore objects and language, torn from their history, brought to our present, and repurposed to reveal the process of their agency. - thru Nov 17

Recently Opened: “Houseface” Adam GreenThe Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYCan end of summer exhibition by artist and musician Adam Green that includes painting, sculpture, and his feature-length film The Wrong Ferrari screened on continuous loop - thru Aug 25

Recently Opened:

Houseface
 Adam Green

The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYC

an end of summer exhibition by artist and musician Adam Green that includes painting, sculpture, and his feature-length film The Wrong Ferrari screened on continuous loop - thru Aug 25

Opens Tonight, May 31, 6-8p: Guy Goldstein: “Bells & Whistles”Erin Dunn: “Rapture’s Adagio" Rooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYCThe term Jaro is a double reference to “year” in Esperanto and “caravan” in the Kichagga language. Time and displacement are integral to the concept of artists-in-residency. The artists in these two solo shows are in residency with Residency Unlimited. On the ground level, Bells & Whistles by Guy Goldstein features a new sound piece alongside works on paper. Goldstein’s investigates how to create meaning in a saturated consumer driven society. In the lower level of the gallery, Rapture’s Adagio by Erin Dunn presents a complex installation of painting, sculpture and a stop motion animation that synthesizes techniques and materials employed with self-produced digital recordings. -thru July 8

Opens Tonight, May 31, 6-8p:

Guy Goldstein: Bells & Whistles
Erin Dunn: Rapture’s Adagio"

Rooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYC

The term Jaro is a double reference to “year” in Esperanto and “caravan” in the
Kichagga language. Time and displacement are integral to the concept of artists-in-residency. The artists in these two solo shows are in residency with Residency Unlimited. On the ground level, Bells & Whistles by Guy Goldstein features a new sound piece alongside works on paper. Goldstein’s investigates how to create meaning in a saturated consumer driven society. In the lower level of the gallery, Rapture’s Adagio by Erin Dunn presents a complex installation of painting, sculpture and a stop motion animation that synthesizes techniques and materials employed with self-produced digital recordings. -thru July 8

Opens Saturday, May 19, 6-8p:”TWISTED SISTERS” curated with Janet PhelpsDODGE gallery, 15 Rivington St., NYCTwisted Sisters is an exhibition of works that are made by women artists and depict women as the subjects. Inspired by 1960’s performance works wherein women turned to the body as the site of creation and content, the exhibition casts the body as protagonist. - thru June 24

Opens Saturday, May 19, 6-8p:

TWISTED SISTERS
 curated with Janet Phelps

DODGE gallery, 15 Rivington St., NYC

Twisted Sisters is an exhibition of works that are made by women artists and depict women as the subjects. Inspired by 1960’s performance works wherein women turned to the body as the site of creation and content, the exhibition casts the body as protagonist. - thru June 24

Reception Tonight, Jan 21, 6-8p:

MIE: A Portrait by 35 Artists

Curated by Nick Lawrence and Mie Iwatsuki

Freight + Volume, 530 W.24th St., NYC

Long a muse and subject of many contemporary masters in the art world, curator/model Mie Iwatsuki joins forces with gallerist/curator/artist Nick Lawrence, of Freight+Volume, to create a very special, intimate portrait show, aptly titled MIE: A Portrait By 35 Artists. Drawing on the ancient tradition of portraiture, but bringing the medium into a contemporary discourse, this show of multiple interpretations of one subject—MIE—promises to be rich and provocative in its variety, insightful and illuminating in its focus. MIE features 35 contemporary prominent and emerging artists, working in every medium—painting, drawing, video, sculpture and performance—who have achieved a unique voice in the realm of portraiture.

Artists:
Noah Becker, Paul Brainard, Maureen Cavanaugh, Thomas Eller, Robert Frank, Peter Garfield, Andrew Guenther, Anthony Haden-Guest, Daniel Heidkamp, Noritoshi Hirakawa, Elizabeth Huey, David Humphrey, Min Hyung, Alex Katz, Kurt Kauper, Kevin Kay, Jeremy Kost, Gil Kuno, Nick Lawrence, June Leaf, Hye Rim Lee, Paul D. Miller, Ikki Miyake, Tom Sanford, Kristen Schiele, Ryan Schneider, Rudy Shepherd, Damian Stamer, Eric White, Barnaby Whitfield, Nicole Wittenberg, Saya Woolfalk, Lin Yilin, O Zhang, Qi Zhilong