nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Fall 2014 Editors Pick
just opened:

Taxonomy
 George Boorujy

The Arsenal Gallery, Central Park, NYC
(830 Fifth Avenue at 64th Street, Third Floor)

a collection of George Boorujy’s dynamic large-scale paintings of North American animals with disarmingly human characteristics, as well as a series of his preliminary clay models and drawings. Boorujy’s hyperrealistic drawings recall the scientific detail of James John Audubon; however he takes liberties with the composition of his subjects, which adds a surrealistic element to his work. He begins his process by creating clay models to achieve slightly fantastic compositions unseen in nature, but that at the same time seem plausible. His extremely detailed portraits are rendered in ink on white paper backgrounds and can measure up to eleven feet long. The scale, meticulous craftsmanship and limited context encourage viewers to pause and see the animals as they never have before. - thru Oct 25

Artist Talk: October 13, 6pm

read our 2012 interview with George Boorujy HERE

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:“Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future” Nir HodPaul Kasmin Gallery, 515 W27th St., NYCexhibition of painting and sculpture features a large sculptural work, a snowglobe containing a moving scale model of a pumpjack encased in oil and swirling “snow” comprised of gold-colored flakes, a reflection of the immense wealth generated by the oil trade. Characteristic of Hod’s work is a dark glamour that is both alluring and menacing, exemplified in his three new series of paintings. In I Want Always to be Remembered in Your Heart, smoldering flames are superimposed on delicate flowers, alluding to the paradoxical coexistence of beauty and destruction. - thru Oct 25

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future
 Nir Hod

Paul Kasmin Gallery, 515 W27th St., NYC

exhibition of painting and sculpture features a large sculptural work, a snowglobe containing a moving scale model of a pumpjack encased in oil and swirling “snow” comprised of gold-colored flakes, a reflection of the immense wealth generated by the oil trade. Characteristic of Hod’s work is a dark glamour that is both alluring and menacing, exemplified in his three new series of paintings. In I Want Always to be Remembered in Your Heart, smoldering flames are superimposed on delicate flowers, alluding to the paradoxical coexistence of beauty and destruction. - thru Oct 25

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:“PeaRoeFoam” Jason RhoadesDavid Zwirner Gallery, 537 W20th St., NYCthe show will be a reinstatement of the artist’s PeaRoeFoam project, which debuted at the gallery in 2002 (then located on Greene Street in SoHo) in the first of a trilogy of exhibitions that also brought it to Vienna and Liverpool the same year. A seminal work within Rhoades’s career, it has not been exhibited as a comprehensive presentation until now and many of the individual components are shown here for the first time since the original installations. PeaRoeFoam was Rhoades’s self-made recipe for a “brand new product and revolutionary new material” created from whole green peas, fish-bait style salmon eggs, and white virgin-beaded foam. When combined with non-toxic glue, they transform into a versatile, fast-drying, and ultimately hard material that Rhoades intended for both utilitarian as well as artistic use—made accessible in the form of do-it-yourself “kits,” complete with everything needed to make PeaRoeFoam, accompanied by the artist’s detailed, step-by-step instructions. - thru Oct 18

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

PeaRoeFoam
 Jason Rhoades

David Zwirner Gallery, 537 W20th St., NYC

the show will be a reinstatement of the artist’s PeaRoeFoam project, which debuted at the gallery in 2002 (then located on Greene Street in SoHo) in the first of a trilogy of exhibitions that also brought it to Vienna and Liverpool the same year. A seminal work within Rhoades’s career, it has not been exhibited as a comprehensive presentation until now and many of the individual components are shown here for the first time since the original installations. PeaRoeFoam was Rhoades’s self-made recipe for a “brand new product and revolutionary new material” created from whole green peas, fish-bait style salmon eggs, and white virgin-beaded foam. When combined with non-toxic glue, they transform into a versatile, fast-drying, and ultimately hard material that Rhoades intended for both utilitarian as well as artistic use—made accessible in the form of do-it-yourself “kits,” complete with everything needed to make PeaRoeFoam, accompanied by the artist’s detailed, step-by-step instructions. - thru Oct 18

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Dust Paintings
 Jenny Holzer

Cheim & Read Gallery, 547 W25th St., NYC

Language has been Holzer’s primary medium since the late 1970s. Placed on electronic signs or stone benches, Holzer’s text investigates how ideas are transformed from argument or opinion into fact. While her work has a conceptual base, she involves her viewer through what’s intensely physical. The documents painted most recently trace the political fallout and human wreckage in the global war on terror. The content of her new work is traced, transferred, and each letter and its surround are carefully hand-painted and re-painted. Holzer’s process echoes and amplifies traditional Arabic calligraphy–ghubar–which translates, literally, as “dust writing.” - thru Oct 25

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
recently opened:

Disharmony in Blue and Gold
 Kent Henricksen

The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC

Known for creating fraught environments that are both inviting and menacing, Henricksen’s work is the combination of opposing forces- the past and present, horror and absurdity, the comic and the tragic, high and low culture. The thread and ink of his canvases are imbued with a complex ambiguity that pushes the images beyond any definitive cultural context. Juxtaposing illustrations of historical events with familiar contemporary images, Henricksen’s work invites you to step into a shamanistic world of non-linear narrative and mythic time. Each canvas is a silkscreened fable in gold ink and meticulously hand embroidered thread. Henricksen explains, “Combining eastern ideas with western images- the large canvases are symbolic labyrinths of the cosmos.  The western images loosely represent the Hindu Trimurti- with a creator, a destroyer and a maintainer.  They are representations of a troubled world with disturbing human behavior- destroying the unknown, protecting or creating the familiar, and maintaining the balance of disturbance” - thru Oct 5

Opens Sun, Sept 7, 6-8p:

Spirit Girls
 Kristen Schiele

Lu Magnus Gallery, 55 Hester St., NYC

Figurative elements float within Schiele’s pattern heavy, lo-fi illustrative, yet playful spatial environments, resulting in a dream-like quality. In imagining the interior and material world of Schiele’s future girl (one in which Schiele imagines her small daughter may create and inhabit as a teenager - her thoughts and creative plans, as well as the architecture and institutions that shape her), Schiele seeks to capture the inspired vision, freedom and lightness in making art for the joy of it. Humor and naiveté are reflected in the writings, experimental drawings, posters and the graffiti a future, semi-fictional realm. Layered, non-linear narratives, ballpoint pen doodles and frequent bursts of bold neon-colored patterns, infuse the work with a graphic novel sensibility.  - thru Oct 12

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Sept 4, 1-6p:

Made for Whites by Whites” and “Rescue
 Nick Cave
 
Jack Shainman Gallery, 513 W20th St., NYC
Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 W24th St., NYC

On view at 524 West 24th Street will be Cave’s body of work Rescue. The series comprises sculptures that incorporate found ceramic dogs sitting on furniture within elaborate grottos or dreamlike dens. Dogs have historically been associated with loyalty, class, breed, commitment, and protection. In the Rescues, Cave focuses on a single canine that has quite literally been rescued from destruction, very much like an adopted pet. These dogs become the benevolent guardians of their self-contained worlds, focusing the spotlight on the forgotten and discarded. Many of the works included in Made for Whites by Whites, on view at 513 West 20th Street, have formal similarities to the Rescues in that central found objects are presented within elaborate armatures built up with items from Cave’s familiar lexicon of ceramic birds and flowers, porcelain fruit, and copies of Capodimonte. However, the content is quite different. In Made for Whites by Whites, racially charged historical objects anchor the works such as the stereotypical representation of a black man with dark skin, big red lips, and white eyes in Untitled, 2014, or the Golliwog costumed mannequin in King of the Hill, 2014. These were once commonplace caricatures that infantilized and dehumanized the African American population. This project began when Cave found a container at a flea market shaped like the head of a black man and labeled ‘Spittoon.’ - thru Oct 11

Opens tonight, Sept 4, 6-8p:“Jennifer Reeves (1963-2014) Memorial Exhibition” BravinLee programs, 526 W26th St., NYC (#211)“We share the grief of Jennifer’s many friends, family and admirers. Jennifer’s paintings, photographs and prose will live on. For those of us who knew her she will be remembered for her loveable genius, her startling candor and her unguarded kindness. All who had the privilege of knowing her images and words will miss sensing that she is around and about to tell us something we will be much richer, inwardly, for hearing.”Artists, in particular, battle inertia in a specific way because the very act of making art is an act of defiance against despair. I think most art is about this battle - how to win it, what it looks like when you don’t, and what it looks like if you do.—Jennifer Reeves Oct. 4 2010A memorial service celebrating Jennifer’s life will be held at 11:00 A.M. September 6 at St. Mark’s Church 131 East 10th St. NYC.pictured: Socrates and Hemlock, 2014, acrylic and collage on panel, 24 x 18 inches

Opens tonight, Sept 4, 6-8p:

Jennifer Reeves (1963-2014) Memorial Exhibition
 
BravinLee programs, 526 W26th St., NYC (#211)

“We share the grief of Jennifer’s many friends, family and admirers. Jennifer’s paintings, photographs and prose will live on. For those of us who knew her she will be remembered for her loveable genius, her startling candor and her unguarded kindness. All who had the privilege of knowing her images and words will miss sensing that she is around and about to tell us something we will be much richer, inwardly, for hearing.”

Artists, in particular, battle inertia in a specific way because the very act of making art is an act of defiance against despair. I think most art is about this battle - how to win it, what it looks like when you don’t, and what it looks like if you do.
—Jennifer Reeves Oct. 4 2010

A memorial service celebrating Jennifer’s life will be held at 11:00 A.M. September 6 at St. Mark’s Church 131 East 10th St. NYC.

pictured: Socrates and Hemlock, 2014, acrylic and collage on panel, 24 x 18 inches

Opens Tomorrow, Sept 4, 6-8p:“Denuded Lens” Roxy PaineMarianne Boesky Gallery,  509 W24th St., NYCFrom the Painting Machines, to the Replicants, to the Dendroids, Paine’s practice illuminates the aesthetic and conceptual paradoxes that lie at the heart of the contemporary condition, addressing the particular tension that arises when chaos and control, fact and artifice, the organic and the industrial, meet. At the center of this exhibition is Checkpoint, the most recent iteration of his latest series, the large-scale Dioramas. A room-sized vision of a generic airport security stop, Checkpoint presents a locale whose practical banality rests uneasily alongside the looming suggestion of larger social anxieties.  - thru Oct 18

Opens Tomorrow, Sept 4, 6-8p:

Denuded Lens
 Roxy Paine

Marianne Boesky Gallery,  509 W24th St., NYC

From the Painting Machines, to the Replicants, to the Dendroids, Paine’s practice illuminates the aesthetic and conceptual paradoxes that lie at the heart of the contemporary condition, addressing the particular tension that arises when chaos and control, fact and artifice, the organic and the industrial, meet. At the center of this exhibition is Checkpoint, the most recent iteration of his latest series, the large-scale Dioramas. A room-sized vision of a generic airport security stop, Checkpoint presents a locale whose practical banality rests uneasily alongside the looming suggestion of larger social anxieties.  - thru Oct 18

Fall 2014 Editor’s PickOpens Sept 7:“Satan Ceramics” Mary Frey, Pat McCarthy, JJ PEET and Tom SachsSalon 94 Freemans,  Freeman Alley, NYC (off Rivington, b/t Bowery & Chrystie St)The four New York-based artists, friends and collaborators included in Satan Ceramics, shape clay with a sense of irreverence, rites and ritual.  Process, politics, labor, the handmade, tradition, humor, gossip, danger, historical nods and punk sensibilities are ultimately tied to the underlying collaborative strategies of integrity of the material and sincerity of the object. As Frey puts it, “Our weekly ritual takes place within the clubhouse where we eat together, share knowledge, discuss, make pots, talk shit and dream.” The artists use ceramics with other materials that are often non-traditional media. - thru Oct 25pictured: Tom Sachs, Cyclops, 2014Porcelain, stereo components, bamboo, and Sharpie markers

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Sept 7:

Satan Ceramics
 Mary Frey, Pat McCarthy, JJ PEET and Tom Sachs

Salon 94 Freemans,  Freeman Alley, NYC
(off Rivington, b/t Bowery & Chrystie St)

The four New York-based artists, friends and collaborators included in Satan Ceramics, shape clay with a sense of irreverence, rites and ritual.  Process, politics, labor, the handmade, tradition, humor, gossip, danger, historical nods and punk sensibilities are ultimately tied to the underlying collaborative strategies of integrity of the material and sincerity of the object. As Frey puts it, “Our weekly ritual takes place within the clubhouse where we eat together, share knowledge, discuss, make pots, talk shit and dream.” The artists use ceramics with other materials that are often non-traditional media. - thru Oct 25

pictured: Tom Sachs, Cyclops, 2014
Porcelain, stereo components, bamboo, and Sharpie markers