nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

opens Feb 12:

The Neighbors
 Paweł Althamer

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC


On view on the Fourth, Third, and Second Floor galleries of New Museum, this will be the first US museum exhibition devoted to the work of Paweł Althamer. Since the early 1990s, Althamer (b. 1967 Warsaw, Poland) has established a unique artistic practice and is admired for his expanded approach to sculptural representation and his experimental models of social collaboration. Althamer is predominantly known for figurative sculptures of himself, his family, and various other individuals within his community. The exhibition will include a new presentation of the artist’s work Draftsmen’s Congress, originally presented at the 7th Berlin Biennial (2012). Over the course of the exhibition, the blank white space of the New Museum’s Fourth Floor gallery will be transformed through the gradual accumulation of drawings and paintings by Museum visitors and more than seventy invited community organizations. Althamer will also activate the exhibition through a sculptural workshop in which the artist and his collaborators will produce new works during the course of the show. For the duration of the exhibition, visitors bringing new or gently used men’s coats to the New Museum will receive free entry. All the coats will be donated to the Bowery Mission.

opens today:“Report on the Construction of a Spaceship Module” curated by tranzit (at.tranzit.org) New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (5th Floor)New Museum’s fifth floor has been transformed into a simulated interior of a spaceship. On view in and around the spacecraft are 117 artworks, including video, sculpture, print, and installation, by artists hailing primarily from cities around Eastern Europe, notably Vienna, Prague, Budapest, Bucharest, and Bratislava. This ambitious exhibition is guest curated for the New Museum’s “Museum as Hub” program by tranzit, a network of autonomous but interconnected organizations based in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia.

opens today:

Report on the Construction of a Spaceship Module
 curated by tranzit (at.tranzit.org)
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (5th Floor)

New Museum’s fifth floor has been transformed into a simulated interior of a spaceship. On view in and around the spacecraft are 117 artworks, including video, sculpture, print, and installation, by artists hailing primarily from cities around Eastern Europe, notably Vienna, Prague, Budapest, Bucharest, and Bratislava. This ambitious exhibition is guest curated for the New Museum’s “Museum as Hub” program by tranzit, a network of autonomous but interconnected organizations based in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia.

closing soon, ends Jan 12:

Extreme Measures
 Chris Burden
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

Spanning a forty-year career and moving across mediums, “Extreme Measures” presents a selection of Burden’s work focused on weights and measures, boundaries and constraints, where physical and moral limits are called into question.

“As an artist, [Burden] was fast out of the gate, establishing his reputation with a series of exquisitely simple, often incendiary performances from 1971 to 1977. Many lasted only a few seconds, others for up to three weeks. But they tested will, discipline and endurance, sometimes to the point of real danger…  Few people saw Mr. Burden’s performances, but no matter: the best of them could be reduced to a vivid sentence or two that, once heard, stuck in the mind. By the mid-1970s, they formed a familiar litany of indelible acts and documentary photographs. After 54 performances, Mr. Burden succumbed to performance art’s primary occupational hazard: It was too grueling. He had always considered his performances sculptures, and now he turned to making sculptures that he saw as performances: feats or demonstrations that delved more deeply into reality with forms other than his body. His art-world visibility shrank because his efforts could no longer be distilled to an unforgettable sentence or two. They had to be experienced directly, which is what the New Museum’s spacious exhibition is all about.” - Roberta Smith, New York Times

closing soon (Sept 1):Llyn FoulkesNew Museum, 235 Bowery, NYCAn influential yet under-recognized artist of his generation, Foulkes makes work that stands out for its raw, immediate, and visceral qualities. Coming from a tradition of West Coast artists working in assemblage in the ’60s, such as Ed Kienholz and Bruce Conner, Foulkes has consistently challenged audiences and expanded his work into new territories. His presentation at the New Museum features nearly one hundred works from the scope of his fifty-year career. These range from the emotionally charged constructions of the early 1960s and his impeccably painted landscapes of the American West, to his deeply disturbing portraits from the late 1970s and his remarkable recent narrative tableaux, which seamlessly blend painting with found materials to create an extraordinary illusion of depth. His diverse body of work resists categorization and defies expectations, distinguishing Foulkes as a truly unique and significant artistic voice.

closing soon (Sept 1):

Llyn Foulkes

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

An influential yet under-recognized artist of his generation, Foulkes makes work that stands out for its raw, immediate, and visceral qualities. Coming from a tradition of West Coast artists working in assemblage in the ’60s, such as Ed Kienholz and Bruce Conner, Foulkes has consistently challenged audiences and expanded his work into new territories. His presentation at the New Museum features nearly one hundred works from the scope of his fifty-year career. These range from the emotionally charged constructions of the early 1960s and his impeccably painted landscapes of the American West, to his deeply disturbing portraits from the late 1970s and his remarkable recent narrative tableaux, which seamlessly blend painting with found materials to create an extraordinary illusion of depth. His diverse body of work resists categorization and defies expectations, distinguishing Foulkes as a truly unique and significant artistic voice.

thru Sept 8:“Stranger Debris Roll Roll Roll” Erika VogtNew Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (Lobby Gallery)Vogt uses a range of media and techniques in order to explore the mutability of images and objects. Within her installations, she fuses elements of sculpture, drawing, video, and photography to produce multilayered image spaces. She challenges prescribed art-making systems, conflating and confusing their logic, as sculptures take on the properties of drawing and photographs take on the nature of film. Building on her background in experimental filmmaking, Vogt’s visually dense videos combine both still and moving images, digital and analog technologies, and playfully incorporate drawings and objects from her previous projects.

thru Sept 8:

Stranger Debris Roll Roll Roll”
 Erika Vogt

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (Lobby Gallery)

Vogt uses a range of media and techniques in order to explore the mutability of images and objects. Within her installations, she fuses elements of sculpture, drawing, video, and photography to produce multilayered image spaces. She challenges prescribed art-making systems, conflating and confusing their logic, as sculptures take on the properties of drawing and photographs take on the nature of film. Building on her background in experimental filmmaking, Vogt’s visually dense videos combine both still and moving images, digital and analog technologies, and playfully incorporate drawings and objects from her previous projects.

Closing Soon, May 26:

NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star
 curated by Massimiliano Gioni, Gary Carrion-Murayari,
 Jenny Moore and Margot Norton

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

the large scale exhibition looks at art made and exhibited in New York over the course of one year. Centering on 1993, the exhibition is conceived as a time capsule, an experiment in collective memory that attempts to capture a specific moment at the intersection of art, pop culture, and politics.

May 23–26:“Sext Me if You Can” Karen FinleyNew Museum (Lobby), 235 Bowery, NYCan interactive performance installation taking place in the New Museum Lobby in full view of Museum visitors. For this performance, Karen Finley creates a limited edition of paintings inspired by “sexts” that she receives from participating patrons. Participation takes the form of a commission and requires a ten-minute private and anonymous sitting on-site during announced performance times (bring your own cell phone!). Through this process, the erotic exchange with the artist—bound by rules of commerce—transforms into a lasting and collectible work of art. Presented as part of NEA 4 in Residence.

May 23–26:

Sext Me if You Can
 Karen Finley

New Museum (Lobby), 235 Bowery, NYC

an interactive performance installation taking place in the New Museum Lobby in full view of Museum visitors. For this performance, Karen Finley creates a limited edition of paintings inspired by “sexts” that she receives from participating patrons. Participation takes the form of a commission and requires a ten-minute private and anonymous sitting on-site during announced performance times (bring your own cell phone!). Through this process, the erotic exchange with the artist—bound by rules of commerce—transforms into a lasting and collectible work of art. Presented as part of NEA 4 in Residence.

Recently Opened: “Amazing Grace” Nari WardNew Museum’s Studio 231, 231 Bowery, NYCThe work is composed of 310 abandoned strollers (collected by the artist from the streets of his neighborhood) surrounded by a field of flattened fire hoses. It is accompanied by a recording of gospel singer Mahalia Jackson singing “Amazing Grace,” suffusing the installation with an uplifting and reverential tone. The objects, in various states of disrepair, speak of the lives of the children they once carried as well as their appropriation by the homeless men and women who would utilize them to transport their own scavenged possessions. Amazing Grace captures the sense of loss, adaptation, and hopefulness that characterized Ward’s experience of New York City in 1993. Originally installed in an abandoned firehouse at 301 West 141st Street in Harlem from September to December 1993. - thru April 21

Recently Opened:

Amazing Grace
 Nari Ward

New Museum’s Studio 231, 231 Bowery, NYC

The work is composed of 310 abandoned strollers (collected by the artist from the streets of his neighborhood) surrounded by a field of flattened fire hoses. It is accompanied by a recording of gospel singer Mahalia Jackson singing “Amazing Grace,” suffusing the installation with an uplifting and reverential tone. The objects, in various states of disrepair, speak of the lives of the children they once carried as well as their appropriation by the homeless men and women who would utilize them to transport their own scavenged possessions. Amazing Grace captures the sense of loss, adaptation, and hopefulness that characterized Ward’s experience of New York City in 1993. Originally installed in an abandoned firehouse at 301 West 141st Street in Harlem from September to December 1993. - thru April 21

David Hammons, In the Hood, 1993. Athletic sweatshirt hood with wire, 23 x 10 x 5 in Opens Feb 13: “NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star”New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYCthe exhibition looks at art made and exhibited in New York over the course of one year. Centering on 1993, the exhibition is conceived as a time capsule, an experiment in collective memory that attempts to capture a specific moment at the intersection of art, pop culture, and politics… brings together a number of iconic and lesser-known artworks that serve as both artifacts from a pivotal moment in the New York art world and as key markers in the cultural history of the city. features over seventy-five artists and will span all five gallery floors of the New Museum.

David Hammons, In the Hood, 1993. Athletic sweatshirt hood with wire, 23 x 10 x 5 in

Opens Feb 13:

NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star

New Museum
, 235 Bowery, NYC

the exhibition looks at art made and exhibited in New York over the course of one year. Centering on 1993, the exhibition is conceived as a time capsule, an experiment in collective memory that attempts to capture a specific moment at the intersection of art, pop culture, and politics… brings together a number of iconic and lesser-known artworks that serve as both artifacts from a pivotal moment in the New York art world and as key markers in the cultural history of the city. features over seventy-five artists and will span all five gallery floors of the New Museum.

Last Day, closes at 6pm: “Preoccupied Waveforms” Haroon MirzaNew Museum’s Studio 231, 231 Bowery, NYC Mirza uses simple industrial materials to radically transform the perceptual experience of architectural space. Over the past ten years, Mirza has deployed a range of analog and digital devices to create dynamic compositions of sound and light. Mirza’s work is often distinguished by its improvised use of outmoded audiovisual technologies. Turntables, speaker cabinets, monitors, and more contemporary electronic equipment are rewired and integrated into objects that recall antiquated technologies, and work together to create new visual and auditory landscapes. More recently, Mirza has expanded his work to take on entire architectural environments. Strands of LED lights, fragments of video, and amplified electricity are programmed to disrupt and destabilize the exhibition space. Exhibit curated by Gary Carrion-Murayari, Curator, and Jenny Moore, Associate Curator.

Last Day, closes at 6pm:

Preoccupied Waveforms
 Haroon Mirza

New Museum’s Studio 231, 231 Bowery, NYC

Mirza uses simple industrial materials to radically transform the perceptual experience of architectural space. Over the past ten years, Mirza has deployed a range of analog and digital devices to create dynamic compositions of sound and light. Mirza’s work is often distinguished by its improvised use of outmoded audiovisual technologies. Turntables, speaker cabinets, monitors, and more contemporary electronic equipment are rewired and integrated into objects that recall antiquated technologies, and work together to create new visual and auditory landscapes. More recently, Mirza has expanded his work to take on entire architectural environments. Strands of LED lights, fragments of video, and amplified electricity are programmed to disrupt and destabilize the exhibition space. Exhibit curated by Gary Carrion-Murayari, Curator, and Jenny Moore, Associate Curator.