nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

begins tonight, runs all weekend:BUSHWICK OPEN STUDIOS 2014Now in its eighth year, Bushwick Open Studios (BOS) is a free three-day arts and culture festival celebrating the neighborhood’s vibrant community and local art scene. Open studios hours vary per artist, so check the directory for precise times. Most studios are open 12pm - 7pm on Saturday, May 31st and Sunday, June 1st. BOS is New York’s largest open studios event, encouraging hundreds of artists to open their doors and share their work. Additionally, visitors can enjoy a series of events, performances, and panels, coordinated by Arts in Bushwick (AiB).

DIRECTORY —> artsinbushwick.org/bos2014/directory

begins tonight, runs all weekend:

BUSHWICK OPEN STUDIOS 2014

Now in its eighth year, Bushwick Open Studios (BOS) is a free three-day arts and culture festival celebrating the neighborhood’s vibrant community and local art scene. Open studios hours vary per artist, so check the directory for precise times. Most studios are open 12pm - 7pm on Saturday, May 31st and Sunday, June 1st. BOS is New York’s largest open studios event, encouraging hundreds of artists to open their doors and share their work. Additionally, visitors can enjoy a series of events, performances, and panels, coordinated by Arts in Bushwick (AiB).

DIRECTORY —> artsinbushwick.org/bos2014/directory

newly opened:“Traces” John Beech, Huma Bhabha, Tacita Dean, Faivovich and Goldberg, Jonathan Marshall, Isabel Nolan, Nam June Paik, Luisa Rabbia  Peter Blum Gallery, 20 W57th St., NYCpictured: Nam June Paik, 18th Century TV, 1971

newly opened:

Traces
 John Beech, Huma Bhabha, Tacita Dean, Faivovich and Goldberg,
 Jonathan Marshall, Isabel Nolan, Nam June Paik, Luisa Rabbia
 
Peter Blum Gallery, 20 W57th St., NYC

pictured: Nam June Paik, 18th Century TV, 1971

thru Sept 7:

13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair

Queens Museum, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY

The exhibition takes Warhol’s 13 Most Wanted Men as its single subject, addressing its creation and destruction and placing it in its artistic and social context by combining art, documentation, and archival material. 50 years have passed since an up-and-coming Pop provocateur named Andy Warhol sparked a minor scandal at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. As part of a prominent set of public commissions for the Philip Johnson-designed New York State Pavilion’s exterior, Warhol chose to enlarge mug shots from a NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Forming a chessboard of front and profile views, 13 Most Wanted Men was installed by April 15, 1964, and painted over by Fair officials’ direction with silver paint a few days later.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:“Figure Studies” Walter RobinsonLynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYCKnown for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:

Figure Studies
 Walter Robinson

Lynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYC

Known for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Fri, May 23, 6-8p:

Geo Land
 Alain Biltereyst
 
Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

Belgium-based painter Alain Biltereyst’s small works on plywood are concerned with everyday, contemporary life. The artist is inspired by geometric forms that he sees on a daily basis, such as logos on currency, advertising on the sides of trucks, and fences against a landscape. He strives to interpret this ‘Geo Land’ into works that are “as simple and poetic as possible.” Formal repetition and color choices reflect the artist’s background in graphic design and fascination with commercial and other urban signs, where the lines between culture and subculture are blurred. Beneath the hard edge geometry of each composition, lies a painterly gesture, implying a depth in the otherwise flat composition. - thru June 22

thru May 31:“Sometimes Comes the Mother, Sometimes the Wolf” Matt BahenMunch Gallery, 245 Broome St., NYCan exhibition of small and large scale oil paintings by Canadian painter, Matt Bahen, recognized for his human scale works on canvas addressing themes of loss and the question of how to carry on. His use of a thick and heavily applied impasto technique emphasizes the visceral quality of the delivery and subject.

thru May 31:

Sometimes Comes the Mother, Sometimes the Wolf
 Matt Bahen

Munch Gallery, 245 Broome St., NYC

an exhibition of small and large scale oil paintings by Canadian painter, Matt Bahen, recognized for his human scale works on canvas addressing themes of loss and the question of how to carry on. His use of a thick and heavily applied impasto technique emphasizes the visceral quality of the delivery and subject.

opens tomorrow, Fri, May 16, 7-9p:

MARGINS
 Frank Webster
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC (bt Delancey & Broome)

Webster’s paintings depict post-industrial landscapes drawing on the aesthetic traditions of minimalism and realism. Summoning a sense of apocalyptic abandonedness, Webster’s compositions pair high-rise buildings with similarly scaled trees, liken barbed-wire fences and electrical wires to the creeping vines that entwine them, and present an urban ecosystem curiously devoid of inhabitants. - thru June 1

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:“Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival at the End of the World” Kahn & Selesnick Yancey Richardson Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYCUtilizing photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and performance, Kahn & Selesnick create robust mythic realities for each project, building imaginary, character-driven fictions from kernels of obscure historical truth. This exhibition follows a fictitious cabaret troupe – Truppe Fledermaus (Bat Troupe) – who travel the countryside staging absurd and inscrutable performances in abandoned landscapes for an audience of no one. The playful but dire message presented by the troupe is of impending ecological disaster, caused by rising waters and a warming planet, the immediate consequences of which include the extinction of the Bat, in this mythology a shamanistic figure representing both nature and humanity. In one sense, the entire cabaret troupe can be seen as a direct reflection of the artists themselves, both entities employing farce and black humor to engage utterly serious concerns. - thru July 3

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:

Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival at the End of the World
 Kahn & Selesnick
 
Yancey Richardson Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYC

Utilizing photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and performance, Kahn & Selesnick create robust mythic realities for each project, building imaginary, character-driven fictions from kernels of obscure historical truth. This exhibition follows a fictitious cabaret troupe – Truppe Fledermaus (Bat Troupe) – who travel the countryside staging absurd and inscrutable performances in abandoned landscapes for an audience of no one. The playful but dire message presented by the troupe is of impending ecological disaster, caused by rising waters and a warming planet, the immediate consequences of which include the extinction of the Bat, in this mythology a shamanistic figure representing both nature and humanity. In one sense, the entire cabaret troupe can be seen as a direct reflection of the artists themselves, both entities employing farce and black humor to engage utterly serious concerns. - thru July 3

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:“Rx for Viewing” Grant Foster / Jesse Wine Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYCa two-person exhibition that brings together the work of London-based artists Grant Foster and Jesse Wine, artists that eschew the contemporary preference toward multi-media and mixed media works. Foster and Wine work unabashedly in one medium: painting and ceramics, respectively. The palpable humor of the works on view, alternatingly mischievous and dark, suggests ambivalence toward contemporary culture, its feigned invocations of morality and the cookie-cutter mentality of digital reproductions. But despite the tone of satire, the works are richly textured, executed delicately, and, ultimately, with a distinct tenderness toward their subject matter.- thru June 9

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:

Rx for Viewing
 Grant Foster / Jesse Wine
 
Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYC

a two-person exhibition that brings together the work of London-based artists Grant Foster and Jesse Wine, artists that eschew the contemporary preference toward multi-media and mixed media works. Foster and Wine work unabashedly in one medium: painting and ceramics, respectively. The palpable humor of the works on view, alternatingly mischievous and dark, suggests ambivalence toward contemporary culture, its feigned invocations of morality and the cookie-cutter mentality of digital reproductions. But despite the tone of satire, the works are richly textured, executed delicately, and, ultimately, with a distinct tenderness toward their subject matter.- thru June 9

recently opened:“mountain girl door” Kim Jones Pierogi Gallery, 177 North 9th St., Brooklyn, NY [ Map ]This exhibition includes drawings and paintings on paper begun as early as 1971 and completed in 2013–2014, following Kim Jones’ uncommon habit of allowing work he considers incomplete to sit, sometimes for years, working back into them from time to time until he is satisfied with the results. Also included are recently completed war drawings, and three new sculptures. In the 1970’s Jones’ performance persona, “Mudman,” could be seen roaming the streets of Los Angeles and Venice, CA and later, in the 1980’s, in New York City; always covered in mud, a nylon stocking stretched over his face, and carrying on his back an unwieldy and crudely constructed lattice-work structure of sticks, tape, mud, and twine. From the beginning he was also drawing, painting, and making three-dimensional works. His two-dimensional pieces range from intricate graphite drawings involving X and dot figures and erasure, indicating movement of each force (referred to as “war drawings”); to works that incorporate acrylic paint, ink line work, and collage; to paintings on photographs (most often of his own past performances), many of which have been made over a period of thirty plus years.

recently opened:

mountain girl door
 Kim Jones
 
Pierogi Gallery, 177 North 9th St., Brooklyn, NY [ Map ]

This exhibition includes drawings and paintings on paper begun as early as 1971 and completed in 2013–2014, following Kim Jones’ uncommon habit of allowing work he considers incomplete to sit, sometimes for years, working back into them from time to time until he is satisfied with the results. Also included are recently completed war drawings, and three new sculptures. In the 1970’s Jones’ performance persona, “Mudman,” could be seen roaming the streets of Los Angeles and Venice, CA and later, in the 1980’s, in New York City; always covered in mud, a nylon stocking stretched over his face, and carrying on his back an unwieldy and crudely constructed lattice-work structure of sticks, tape, mud, and twine. From the beginning he was also drawing, painting, and making three-dimensional works. His two-dimensional pieces range from intricate graphite drawings involving X and dot figures and erasure, indicating movement of each force (referred to as “war drawings”); to works that incorporate acrylic paint, ink line work, and collage; to paintings on photographs (most often of his own past performances), many of which have been made over a period of thirty plus years.