nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

recently opened:

Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe
 
Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Ave., NYC (at 89th St)

The first comprehensive retrospective of Italian Futurism in a U.S. museum, the exhibition traces the full development of Futurism in Italy, from its inception with F. T. Marinetti’s publication of the Futurist manifesto in 1909 to its demise at the end of World War II. Featuring more than 360 works, including noted paintings and sculptures such as Giacomo Balla’s Paths of Movement + Dynamic Sequences (1913) and Benedetta’s Syntheses of Communications (1933–34), which has never before been presented in America, the exhibition also examines the Futurists’ efforts to refashion everyday life through advertising, architecture, design, fashion, film, music, photography, poetry, and theater.
exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism

pictured:
Gino Severini, Blue Dancer (Ballerina blu), 1912
Futurist Manifesto from 1909 (photo: Suzanne DeChillo/NY Times)
Benedetta Cappa (photo: Suzanne DeChillo/NY Times)
Ardengo Soffici, Simultaneity and Lyrical Chemistry, 1915 (photo: Suzanne DeChillo/NY Times)

just opened:“Fabricated Revisions” Megan Whitmarsh MULHERIN + POLLARD Gallery, 187 Chrystie St., NYCWorking predominantly with textiles, Megan Whitmarsh uses hand-stitched embroidery to fabricate replicas of personal and cultural ephemera. Although she also creates comic books, paintings, drawings, and stop animation, Whitmarsh is best known for her hand-embroidered canvases and soft sculptures, which make reference to both contemporary pop culture and the 1970s and ’80s eras of her childhood. “The artists I find compelling are mostly women and I decided to pay tribute to this personal fact. Many of these works are from a fictionalized past. From 1970-1980, Artforum devoted 5 of it’s 99 covers to women artists.” – Megan Whitmarsh, 2013

just opened:

Fabricated Revisions
 Megan Whitmarsh
 
MULHERIN + POLLARD Gallery, 187 Chrystie St., NYC

Working predominantly with textiles, Megan Whitmarsh uses hand-stitched embroidery to fabricate replicas of personal and cultural ephemera. Although she also creates comic books, paintings, drawings, and stop animation, Whitmarsh is best known for her hand-embroidered canvases and soft sculptures, which make reference to both contemporary pop culture and the 1970s and ’80s eras of her childhood. “The artists I find compelling are mostly women and I decided to pay tribute to this personal fact. Many of these works are from a fictionalized past. From 1970-1980, Artforum devoted 5 of it’s 99 covers to women artists.” – Megan Whitmarsh, 2013

Fri, Feb 21, 3p:“Theodore’s Drawing Salon” by Ted Barrow, curated by Alise Tifentale Engineer’s Office Gallery, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, NYC (bt 48th and 49th St)These Drawing Salons began with a fascination of 19th century parlor culture combined with an innocuous and particular pleasure taken from drawing with friends. The project will involve a group of artists meeting at the Engineer’s Office Gallery, touring the galleries of Christie’s and drawing a selected group of objects or images on auction, then installing their renditions of these images in the space provided. The drawings, once installed, can be photographed and documented however each artist wants, but left in the space with the understanding that they will likely be taken down and destroyed by a third party. Although the format and size of the paper will not be regulated, ink drawings are a must. Theodore’s Drawing Salon is an attempt to reflect on the seemingly victorious digitalization of the present-day culture. As a comment to the era of easily accessible tools of digital image-making and platforms for image-sharing, the Salon proposes an explicitly analog image-making and image-sharing environment. Yet the Salon will have its online presence and the team will happily engage in discussion and dissemination of the drawings.pictured: William-Adolphe Bouguereau, The Oreads, 1902

Fri, Feb 21, 3p:

Theodore’s Drawing Salon
 by Ted Barrow, curated by Alise Tifentale
 
Engineer’s Office Gallery, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, NYC (bt 48th and 49th St)

These Drawing Salons began with a fascination of 19th century parlor culture combined with an innocuous and particular pleasure taken from drawing with friends. The project will involve a group of artists meeting at the Engineer’s Office Gallery, touring the galleries of Christie’s and drawing a selected group of objects or images on auction, then installing their renditions of these images in the space provided. The drawings, once installed, can be photographed and documented however each artist wants, but left in the space with the understanding that they will likely be taken down and destroyed by a third party. Although the format and size of the paper will not be regulated, ink drawings are a must. Theodore’s Drawing Salon is an attempt to reflect on the seemingly victorious digitalization of the present-day culture. As a comment to the era of easily accessible tools of digital image-making and platforms for image-sharing, the Salon proposes an explicitly analog image-making and image-sharing environment. Yet the Salon will have its online presence and the team will happily engage in discussion and dissemination of the drawings.

pictured: William-Adolphe Bouguereau, The Oreads, 1902

opens tonight, Feb 19, 6-8p:“«suddenly I felt the river in me»” Carolina Raquel AntichLynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYCfeaturing porcelain artworks and a series of canvases, the exhibition is a purview of Antich’s longtime fascination with childhood. Antich recently embraced a sculptural extension of her paintings, magnifying the delicateness and fragility of her subjects and the situations they are involved in. While the artist’s paintings often evoke an allegorical worldview, depicting children in a territory where there is no fear, a free zone full of nuances and beauty, the sculptural work brings to the fore spaces of protection and refuge, while underscoring the autistic condition of her subjects in their extreme mode of concentration.

opens tonight, Feb 19, 6-8p:

«suddenly I felt the river in me»
 Carolina Raquel Antich

Lynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYC


featuring porcelain artworks and a series of canvases, the exhibition is a purview of Antich’s longtime fascination with childhood. Antich recently embraced a sculptural extension of her paintings, magnifying the delicateness and fragility of her subjects and the situations they are involved in. While the artist’s paintings often evoke an allegorical worldview, depicting children in a territory where there is no fear, a free zone full of nuances and beauty, the sculptural work brings to the fore spaces of protection and refuge, while underscoring the autistic condition of her subjects in their extreme mode of concentration.

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:“Synthesa” Erwin Wurm Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYCWorking in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:

Synthesa
 Erwin Wurm
 
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYC

Working in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

closing Feb 15:

Requiem
 Sally Tittmann
 
William Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYC (corner of Grand St)

The exhibition is centered around a trio of monumental sculptures made of discarded commercial 4 x 4 wooden beams, along with a group of intimate wall sculptures and a series of beautifully rendered large drawings in pencil.

opens Feb 27, 6-8p:“Slow Your Instruments” Clayton Colvin Launch F18 Gallery, 373 Broadway, NYCColvin’s complex yet intimate new works on linen that combine charcoal, graphite, pigment and acrylic in a painterly field of incredible richness and depth. These new works continue Colvin’s exploration of what critic Cinque Hicks recently described in Art in America as his “naked search for new answers to old questions.” Having the capacity to represent the onslaught of technology against the resistance of history is an element of the approach to Colvin’s studio practice. Works such as the eponymous slow your instruments contrasts the suggestion of the ubiquitous pixel, with its square shape, against the deep, blue depths of the picture’s plane.

opens Feb 27, 6-8p:

Slow Your Instruments
 Clayton Colvin
 
Launch F18 Gallery, 373 Broadway, NYC

Colvin’s complex yet intimate new works on linen that combine charcoal, graphite, pigment and acrylic in a painterly field of incredible richness and depth. These new works continue Colvin’s exploration of what critic Cinque Hicks recently described in Art in America as his “naked search for new answers to old questions.” Having the capacity to represent the onslaught of technology against the resistance of history is an element of the approach to Colvin’s studio practice. Works such as the eponymous slow your instruments contrasts the suggestion of the ubiquitous pixel, with its square shape, against the deep, blue depths of the picture’s plane.

recently opened:

Family Business
 Paul Edlin
 
Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)

“This truth is that if it hadn’t been for Paul Edlin (1931 - 2008), this gallery never would have existed…  Born in 1931 with a profound hearing loss, Paul Edlin never found a steady career path but had always been interested in art. Finally, in 1972 at the age of 41, he enrolled in art classes over a period of about ten years at the Art Students League and New School, where he was mentored by renowned American artists Will Barnet and Henry Pearson. In the early 1980s Edlin began incorporating postage stamps into his artworks and by the 90s was using them exclusively, choosing them from those of many nations for colors and visual texture. He sliced them into tiny pieces, which he used like mosaic tiles, gluing them on museum board until his compositions were finalized. His scenes of people and mythological figures, animals and objects suggest a mystical personal cosmology. His 16 x 20 inch collages could take as long as three months to complete, and he worked diligently every day, alone in his one-room New York apartment.” - Andrew Edlin

thru Feb 15:“The Energy Reader” Michael Alan Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert Gallery, 33 Orchard St., NYCseries of new paintings and drawings, “a combination of harmonious opposites, close observation, catharsis, a means of communication and a radical juxtaposition of dimensional elements. He challenges everything: concepts of figure, composition, media and movement, including his own. Exploring the ambiguity of time and history, Alan’s work focuses on crossbreeding and the relationship of destruction and creation.”

thru Feb 15:

The Energy Reader
 Michael Alan
 
Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert Gallery, 33 Orchard St., NYC

series of new paintings and drawings, “a combination of harmonious opposites, close observation, catharsis, a means of communication and a radical juxtaposition of dimensional elements. He challenges everything: concepts of figure, composition, media and movement, including his own. Exploring the ambiguity of time and history, Alan’s work focuses on crossbreeding and the relationship of destruction and creation.”

opens Feb 27:“Underworld” Klara Kristalova Galerie Perrotin, 909 Madison Ave., NYC (at 73rd St)Klara Kristalova constructs a dark, odd, and yet familiar world. The characters that inhabit her universe are peculiar, alone, quiet, perhaps lost, as if they have just escaped from a cruel tale, waiting for a passer-by to stop and indicate the way. Made from glazed ceramics, Kristalova’s figures carry a raw, vulnerable, human feel to them. Drawing from Nordic storytelling and traditional myths, Kristalova manages to convey basic human emotions such as fear, love, sadness and guilt, which emerge from her work like memories from our own childhood. Presented concurrently, another solo exhibition by Klara Kristalova, “Big Girl Now" will be held at Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie St., NYC

opens Feb 27:

Underworld
 Klara Kristalova
 
Galerie Perrotin, 909 Madison Ave., NYC (at 73rd St)

Klara Kristalova constructs a dark, odd, and yet familiar world. The characters that inhabit her universe are peculiar, alone, quiet, perhaps lost, as if they have just escaped from a cruel tale, waiting for a passer-by to stop and indicate the way. Made from glazed ceramics, Kristalova’s figures carry a raw, vulnerable, human feel to them. Drawing from Nordic storytelling and traditional myths, Kristalova manages to convey basic human emotions such as fear, love, sadness and guilt, which emerge from her work like memories from our own childhood. Presented concurrently, another solo exhibition by Klara Kristalova, “Big Girl Now" will be held at Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie St., NYC