nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

opens tomorrow, June 19, 6-8p:“Begotten, Not Made” Nicola Samori Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYCMore than a trick of the eye, Samori’s paintings treat their surface as a material skin transcribing the memory of their process. “Like the eye adjusting to darkness, adaptation is necessary upon entering Samori’s visual cosmos. The images stare at us in an effort of denied vision. With the icy gaze of a femme fatale warning us that she is beyond our reach, they block our penetration. The images feel us, smell us, judge us. They are watching, but they don’t see. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. And we see through a glass, darkly. Sometimes peering in, other times peeling back in search of the surface beneath the surface beneath the surface.”

opens tomorrow, June 19, 6-8p:

Begotten, Not Made
 Nicola Samori
 
Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYC

More than a trick of the eye, Samori’s paintings treat their surface as a material skin transcribing the memory of their process. “Like the eye adjusting to darkness, adaptation is necessary upon entering Samori’s visual cosmos. The images stare at us in an effort of denied vision. With the icy gaze of a femme fatale warning us that she is beyond our reach, they block our penetration. The images feel us, smell us, judge us. They are watching, but they don’t see. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. And we see through a glass, darkly. Sometimes peering in, other times peeling back in search of the surface beneath the surface beneath the surface.”

opens tonight, Wed, June 18, 6-8p:

Leaps into the Void: Shamanism, Meditation, Transcendence, Oblivion”
 Gwyn Joy, Sky Kim, Michael Maxwell,
 Joe Nanashe, Phoebe Rathmell
 
Garis & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYC

a group exhibition united by the philosophical underpinnings and practical objectives of each artist’s own practice in addressing concepts related to meditation and altered mental states, physical and mental transcendence and Eastern and Western belief systems related to cycles of life.

closes soon (June 15):

Lebbeus Woods, Architect
 
The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC

The exhibition brings together works from the past forty years by architect Lebbeus Woods, centering on transformation as a recurring theme and providing a framework for understanding the experimental nature of his work. Acknowledging the parallels between society’s physical and psychological constructions, Woods has depicted a career-long narrative of how these constructions transform our being. Working mostly, but not exclusively, with pencil on paper, Woods has created an oeuvre of complex worlds—at times abstract and at times explicit—that present shifts, cycles, repetitions within the built environment. His timeless architecture is not in a particular style or in response to a singular moment in the field; rather, it offers an opportunity to consider how built forms impact the individual and the collective, and reflect contemporary political, social and ideological conditions, and how one person contributes to the development and mutation of the built world.

thru July 29:“Me, My Mother, My Father, and I” Ragnar Kjartansson New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYCthe first New York museum exhibition of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson presents works with and about his family, including a newly orchestrated performance and video piece entitled Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage (2011/2014), in which ten musicians play a live composition for the duration of the exhibition. This work takes inspiration from a scene in Iceland’s first feature film, Morðsaga (1977), directed by Reynir Oddsson, in which the main character of the film, played by Kjartansson’s mother, Guðrún Ásmundsdóttir, fantasizes about a plumber, played by Kjartansson’s father, Kjartan Ragnarsson, in a sex scene on the kitchen floor. As family legend has it, Kjartansson was conceived the night after the film shoot. Kjartan Sveinsson, composer and a former member of the Icelandic band Sigur Rós, transformed the scene’s dialogue into a ten-part polyphony played by ten musicians, who sing and play guitar in the tradition of the troubadour to accompany a projection of the original film scene. (photo: Benoit Pailley)

thru July 29:

Me, My Mother, My Father, and I
 Ragnar Kjartansson
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

the first New York museum exhibition of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson presents works with and about his family, including a newly orchestrated performance and video piece entitled Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage (2011/2014), in which ten musicians play a live composition for the duration of the exhibition. This work takes inspiration from a scene in Iceland’s first feature film, Morðsaga (1977), directed by Reynir Oddsson, in which the main character of the film, played by Kjartansson’s mother, Guðrún Ásmundsdóttir, fantasizes about a plumber, played by Kjartansson’s father, Kjartan Ragnarsson, in a sex scene on the kitchen floor. As family legend has it, Kjartansson was conceived the night after the film shoot. Kjartan Sveinsson, composer and a former member of the Icelandic band Sigur Rós, transformed the scene’s dialogue into a ten-part polyphony played by ten musicians, who sing and play guitar in the tradition of the troubadour to accompany a projection of the original film scene. (photo: Benoit Pailley)

begins tonight, runs all weekend:BUSHWICK OPEN STUDIOS 2014Now in its eighth year, Bushwick Open Studios (BOS) is a free three-day arts and culture festival celebrating the neighborhood’s vibrant community and local art scene. Open studios hours vary per artist, so check the directory for precise times. Most studios are open 12pm - 7pm on Saturday, May 31st and Sunday, June 1st. BOS is New York’s largest open studios event, encouraging hundreds of artists to open their doors and share their work. Additionally, visitors can enjoy a series of events, performances, and panels, coordinated by Arts in Bushwick (AiB).

DIRECTORY —> artsinbushwick.org/bos2014/directory

begins tonight, runs all weekend:

BUSHWICK OPEN STUDIOS 2014

Now in its eighth year, Bushwick Open Studios (BOS) is a free three-day arts and culture festival celebrating the neighborhood’s vibrant community and local art scene. Open studios hours vary per artist, so check the directory for precise times. Most studios are open 12pm - 7pm on Saturday, May 31st and Sunday, June 1st. BOS is New York’s largest open studios event, encouraging hundreds of artists to open their doors and share their work. Additionally, visitors can enjoy a series of events, performances, and panels, coordinated by Arts in Bushwick (AiB).

DIRECTORY —> artsinbushwick.org/bos2014/directory

newly opened:“Traces” John Beech, Huma Bhabha, Tacita Dean, Faivovich and Goldberg, Jonathan Marshall, Isabel Nolan, Nam June Paik, Luisa Rabbia  Peter Blum Gallery, 20 W57th St., NYCpictured: Nam June Paik, 18th Century TV, 1971

newly opened:

Traces
 John Beech, Huma Bhabha, Tacita Dean, Faivovich and Goldberg,
 Jonathan Marshall, Isabel Nolan, Nam June Paik, Luisa Rabbia
 
Peter Blum Gallery, 20 W57th St., NYC

pictured: Nam June Paik, 18th Century TV, 1971

thru Sept 7:

13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World’s Fair

Queens Museum, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY

The exhibition takes Warhol’s 13 Most Wanted Men as its single subject, addressing its creation and destruction and placing it in its artistic and social context by combining art, documentation, and archival material. 50 years have passed since an up-and-coming Pop provocateur named Andy Warhol sparked a minor scandal at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. As part of a prominent set of public commissions for the Philip Johnson-designed New York State Pavilion’s exterior, Warhol chose to enlarge mug shots from a NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Forming a chessboard of front and profile views, 13 Most Wanted Men was installed by April 15, 1964, and painted over by Fair officials’ direction with silver paint a few days later.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:“Figure Studies” Walter RobinsonLynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYCKnown for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:

Figure Studies
 Walter Robinson

Lynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYC

Known for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Fri, May 23, 6-8p:

Geo Land
 Alain Biltereyst
 
Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

Belgium-based painter Alain Biltereyst’s small works on plywood are concerned with everyday, contemporary life. The artist is inspired by geometric forms that he sees on a daily basis, such as logos on currency, advertising on the sides of trucks, and fences against a landscape. He strives to interpret this ‘Geo Land’ into works that are “as simple and poetic as possible.” Formal repetition and color choices reflect the artist’s background in graphic design and fascination with commercial and other urban signs, where the lines between culture and subculture are blurred. Beneath the hard edge geometry of each composition, lies a painterly gesture, implying a depth in the otherwise flat composition. - thru June 22

thru May 31:“Sometimes Comes the Mother, Sometimes the Wolf” Matt BahenMunch Gallery, 245 Broome St., NYCan exhibition of small and large scale oil paintings by Canadian painter, Matt Bahen, recognized for his human scale works on canvas addressing themes of loss and the question of how to carry on. His use of a thick and heavily applied impasto technique emphasizes the visceral quality of the delivery and subject.

thru May 31:

Sometimes Comes the Mother, Sometimes the Wolf
 Matt Bahen

Munch Gallery, 245 Broome St., NYC

an exhibition of small and large scale oil paintings by Canadian painter, Matt Bahen, recognized for his human scale works on canvas addressing themes of loss and the question of how to carry on. His use of a thick and heavily applied impasto technique emphasizes the visceral quality of the delivery and subject.