nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

continues thru Mar 30:“Still.Life” Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,  Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop YoonOUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYCThe most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

continues thru Mar 30:

Still.Life
 Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,
 Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop Yoon

OUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYC


The most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

thru Oct 19:Phil CollinsTanya Bonakdar Gallery, 521 W 21st St., NYCthree large-scale installations incorporating television, film, music and photography. “Collins has never shied away from taking the real lives of others - messy and awkward though they may be - as the material for his art, in which he interrogates the nature of collaboration and the contract between subject and maker…” - Kirsty Bell, Art in America

thru Oct 19:

Phil Collins

Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, 521 W 21st St., NYC

three large-scale installations incorporating television, film, music and photography. “Collins has never shied away from taking the real lives of others - messy and awkward though they may be - as the material for his art, in which he interrogates the nature of collaboration and the contract between subject and maker…” - Kirsty Bell, Art in America

opens Fri, Sept 6, 6-8p:“House and Universe” Mary MattinglyRobert Mann Gallery, 525 W26th St., NYCmultimedia artist Mary Mattingly weaves together lush digital photography with experimental design to tackle real-world environmental issues in ways that are both radical and pragmatic. Mattingly imagines a world of imminent vicissitude, in which humanity must become reliant on a collective ingenuity in order to survive floods, war, and the inevitable decay of the urban habitat. - thru Oct 19

opens Fri, Sept 6, 6-8p:

House and Universe
 Mary Mattingly

Robert Mann Gallery, 525 W26th St., NYC

multimedia artist Mary Mattingly weaves together lush digital photography with experimental design to tackle real-world environmental issues in ways that are both radical and pragmatic. Mattingly imagines a world of imminent vicissitude, in which humanity must become reliant on a collective ingenuity in order to survive floods, war, and the inevitable decay of the urban habitat. - thru Oct 19

nycARTscene Interview: Saya Woolfalk

Saya Woolfalk’s exhibition “Chimera” is currently on view at Third Streaming and runs through April 25, 2013 with a related performance on March 7, 2013.

nycARTscene’s Hannah Krafcik leads us in conversation with the artist:

HK: You present your artwork as fragments of a fantastical world beyond what we know. Our only point of access is through what you show us, and this is all birthed from a detailed narrative. Can you summarize the narrative through-line of your work?

SW: The video in my show at Third Streaming, “Tour of the Institute of Empathy,” tells the entire story of the Empathics: they develop second heads; have hallucinations of various forms of biological and cultural mixture; and activate what they see in their hallucinations through various social “formations.”

This narrative has emerged through process. As I collaborate across disciplines one project comes out of the last. I attempt to follow the stories that emerge and tease them out to their logical conclusions.

I have been working on No Place and the Empathics for 6 years. From 2006-2008, I worked with filmmaker and anthropologist Rachel Lears to document a fictional future utopian world called No Place. The people of No Place are part human and part plant and change gender and color and transform into the landscape when they die. They also transform recycled materials into usable technologies. We presented our collaboration as film called Ethnography of No Place.

In 2009, I started to think about how people in the present might actually become like the people of this fictional future, and I started working with dancers, biologists, and neuroscientists to explore this concept. In 2012, I presented the material at the Montclair Art Museum, and decided to use ethnographic museum techniques to tell the story as it had emerged.

HK: The No Placeans and Empathics’ world is comprised of what many consider a “craft” aesthetic, but interspersed are other objects recognizable from theater and performance. Can you speak to the blending of materials in your work?

SW: I love the idea that ordinary materials can be transformed into magical things. Since early in my art education the transformation of domestic materials and objects was presented as a powerful method for making art. I studied feminist art at Brown and worked with Faith Wilding at the Art Institute of Chicago (one of the founding participants of Womanhouse). As a kid, I also learned to sew from my grandmother in Japan; and, before I had a studio, sewing was a way I could make work on a domestic scale. Slowly the small objects transformed into immersive environments. After spending time in Brazil studying Carnaval, I started to build entire performative fantastical worlds.

HK: How has your interest in anthropology paved the way for your trajectory in visual art?  Does this have any bearing on the multi-media and performative nature of what you create?

SW: When I started working, I was looking for a way to describe alternative world systems through playful artmaking. By using the descriptive methods of anthropology—poking fun at them, while also thinking with them—I have been able to immerse myself in the logics of the places I construct. I am also surrounded by anthropology everyday. My husband is an anthropologist, and he is one of my inspirations.

HK: Because you take such an anthropological approach to discussing and presenting your work, people who visit your exhibitions have been know to wonder if what you are “studying” might actually be real. Do you think it is? Did you create these beings? Are they from the future, do they exist in an alternate reality, or do they come into being from your imagination?

SW: I love this question. I do think Empathics exist. They are people who struggle with intergroup contact and attempt to take disparate material and fuse it and make it make sense. In some way we are all Empathics. Being an Empathics is a kind of metaphor for the gradual transformation of US culture. In the US we experience conflict because of intergroup contact. We then incorporate parts of other cultures into our own. The nature of what it means to be United Statesian is constantly changing because of these contact points and our gradual transformation.

HK:  Though you are based in New York City, you frequently show work outside of New York in the North East. Does your work and its intersection with nature draw you away from urban environments? What brings you back to New York for your latest exhibition, Chimera?

SW: As I enter into my next project, “Land of the Pleasure Machines”—which is about biological and the technological mixture—movement between the urban and natural environments will emerge as an important element of my work. We have a little place we like to go in the woods of upstate NY where I can think and read and take walks with my husband and our daughter. The impact of these real experiences can be felt, and that’s what I love about Yona’s space [Third Streaming]. It is a wonderful urban place where many kinds of people come in contact with each other so that art and life can happen. It is a place where art is living and breathing and all sorts of fantastical things can happen.

Third Streaming: 10 Greene Street, NY, NY thirdstreaming.com

Saya Woolfalk: www.sayawoolfalk.com

Opens tomorrow, Jan 31, 6-8p:

The Visitors
 Ragnar Kjartansson

Luhring Augustine, 531 W24th St., NYC

This show marks the New York debut of Icelandic artist Kjartansson’s most recent project, The Visitors, a nine-channel video installation based on a musical performance staged in upstate New York at Rokeby Farm.  For this new work, the artist assembled a group of his closest friends, some of the most renowned musicians from Reykjavik and beyond. A depiction of individual creative minds at work and a baring of extreme collective emotion, The Visitors continues Kjartansson’s use of durational performance to explore the persona of the performer. - thru Mar 16

thru Feb 16: “Necrocracy” Marina Zurkowbitforms gallery, 529 W20th St., NYCZurkow is known for cross-disciplinary animation work and her participatory art environments. The exhibition Necrocracy explores “governance of the dead”, focusing on the geologic chronology of oil and the culture of petrochemical production. Featuring four new projects, it furthers Zurkow’s investigations of human relationships with animals, plants and weather. These works rigorously engage the politics of the body’s interrelationships with landscape, and question the Romantic-era division between the natural and human – specifically, how our society disturbs, worships and is dominated by beings that are long dead.

thru Feb 16:

Necrocracy
 Marina Zurkow

bitforms gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC

Zurkow is known for cross-disciplinary animation work and her participatory art environments. The exhibition Necrocracy explores “governance of the dead”, focusing on the geologic chronology of oil and the culture of petrochemical production. Featuring four new projects, it furthers Zurkow’s investigations of human relationships with animals, plants and weather. These works rigorously engage the politics of the body’s interrelationships with landscape, and question the Romantic-era division between the natural and human – specifically, how our society disturbs, worships and is dominated by beings that are long dead.

Recently Opened:“Props For Memory” Joseph Beuys, Paul P., Amanda Ross-HoINVISIBLE-EXPORTS, 14A Orchard St., NYC (bt Hester and Canal)The work of the three artists presented here addresses the problem of time raised by the failures of memory—the false promise of total recall and the failure of even the most savantish memory, or the deepest archive, to truly preserve. The two living artists, Paris-based painter Paul P. and Los Angeles multimedia artist Amanda Ross-Ho, each present portraits of moments otherwise destined to be forgotten, portraits that encode a kind of ambivalence about the project of remembering or preserving itself—snapshots of moments clouded by indeterminancy, vagueness, fantasy, and flux. Beuys, whose Economic Value work is included as a kind of forebear, addresses the problem in a more innocent way—by assembling a Potemkin grocery store, filled with bygone products he remembered keenly from his own postwar childhood, as a kind of record, of his own inner life as a pre-teen commodity fetishist, understandable only to him and, therefore, doomed to decay. - thru Oct 21

Recently Opened:

Props For Memory
 Joseph Beuys, Paul P., Amanda Ross-Ho

INVISIBLE-EXPORTS, 14A Orchard St., NYC (bt Hester and Canal)

The work of the three artists presented here addresses the problem of time raised by the failures of memory—the false promise of total recall and the failure of even the most savantish memory, or the deepest archive, to truly preserve. The two living artists, Paris-based painter Paul P. and Los Angeles multimedia artist Amanda Ross-Ho, each present portraits of moments otherwise destined to be forgotten, portraits that encode a kind of ambivalence about the project of remembering or preserving itself—snapshots of moments clouded by indeterminancy, vagueness, fantasy, and flux. Beuys, whose Economic Value work is included as a kind of forebear, addresses the problem in a more innocent way—by assembling a Potemkin grocery store, filled with bygone products he remembered keenly from his own postwar childhood, as a kind of record, of his own inner life as a pre-teen commodity fetishist, understandable only to him and, therefore, doomed to decay. - thru Oct 21

Video Recap: Rahzel’s Breathtaking Beatbox Battle with Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s “Voice Array” at Bitforms Gallery.

Opens Tonight, 6-8p:

Voice Array
 Rafael Lozano-Hemmer
 featuring special guest, beatbox legend Rahzel

Bitforms Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (2nd Floor)
bitforms.tumblr.com

United States premiere of two projects: Voice Array, a participatory environment that debuted last Fall in Sydney, Australia, at the Museum of Contemporary Art; and Last Breath, a robotic installation that stores and circulates the breath of a person forever, between a bellows and a brown paper bag.  Voice Array is a construction for vocal improvisation that uses blinking LEDs and a customized intercom system of audio playback and recording. The exhibition’s opening will feature a performance by vocal percussionist Rahzel, The Godfather of Noyze, who will explore Lozano-Hemmer’s “Voice Array” within the musical context of human beatboxing. - thru Oct 13

thru July 22:

LIfe is Juicy
 Stewart Uoo

47 Canal Gallery
, 47 Canal St., NYC
Wednesday - Saturday / 12-6pm