nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru Sept 7:“Object Matter” Robert HeineckenThe Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCThis is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Sept 7:

Object Matter
 Robert Heinecken

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

This is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

Opens April 11:

Submerged Motherlands
 Swoon
 
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYC

Brooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago.

photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq

Opens Thurs, Apr 10, 6-8p:“Sideshow” Matthew Schreiber Johannes Vogt Gallery, 526 W26th St., NYC #205this first New York solo exhibition by Matthew Schreiber spans across both exhibition spaces of the gallery and combines works across varying mediums including light sculptures, holography, photography, and an immersive architectural intervention that features a laser diode installation and will take over the entire rear gallery.

Opens Thurs, Apr 10, 6-8p:

Sideshow
 Matthew Schreiber
 
Johannes Vogt Gallery, 526 W26th St., NYC #205

this first New York solo exhibition by Matthew Schreiber spans across both exhibition spaces of the gallery and combines works across varying mediums including light sculptures, holography, photography, and an immersive architectural intervention that features a laser diode installation and will take over the entire rear gallery.

thru Feb 2:“Woman To Go” Mathilde ter HeijneJack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYCpart of an ongoing traveling installation displaying postcards which can be taken for free. Each postcard shows a portrait of an unknown woman that lived between 1839 (the beginning of photography with Daguerreotypes) and the 1920s. On the message side is the biography of a known woman who was influential or extraordinary in her time. The pictures and biographies were collected from all over the world. The women whose biographies are known, all struggled for their individual goals in a world where men were predominant, where women didn’t have the right to vote or to own property, and only men were thought to be worth remembering. Most of these women have been forgotten and the many unknown women help us to remember the known. The postcards are to be taken for free in order to give people the opportunity to “take away” a female role model, or a little source of inspiration.”

thru Feb 2:

Woman To Go
 Mathilde ter Heijne

Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

part of an ongoing traveling installation displaying postcards which can be taken for free. Each postcard shows a portrait of an unknown woman that lived between 1839 (the beginning of photography with Daguerreotypes) and the 1920s. On the message side is the biography of a known woman who was influential or extraordinary in her time. The pictures and biographies were collected from all over the world. The women whose biographies are known, all struggled for their individual goals in a world where men were predominant, where women didn’t have the right to vote or to own property, and only men were thought to be worth remembering. Most of these women have been forgotten and the many unknown women help us to remember the known. The postcards are to be taken for free in order to give people the opportunity to “take away” a female role model, or a little source of inspiration.”

opens Fri, Jan 31, 6-8p:KAZUKO MIYAMOTOINVISIBLE-EXPORTS Gallery, 89 Eldridge St., NYCthe first solo exhibition in New York, in over a decade, of work by Kazuko Miyamoto, a preeminent feminist figure of minimalism. Born in wartime Tokyo, Miyamoto moved to New York in 1964, studied at the Arts Student League, and soon became assistant to Sol Lewitt… In her early work, (between 1968 and 1972), Miyamoto was primarily a painter of large-scale bichromatic acrylic canvases, works that inflected and, in some ways, undermined formal systems with modest, organic painterly elements. In 1973, the year of her first gallery shows in New York and Italy, Miyamoto embarked on a major nail-and-string wall-based installation at MoMA—the elegant, path-breaking site-specific work which she had been refining for several years as she moved away from painting, and would become her signature work between 1972 and 1979.

opens Fri, Jan 31, 6-8p:

KAZUKO MIYAMOTO

INVISIBLE-EXPORTS Gallery, 89 Eldridge St., NYC

the first solo exhibition in New York, in over a decade, of work by Kazuko Miyamoto, a preeminent feminist figure of minimalism. Born in wartime Tokyo, Miyamoto moved to New York in 1964, studied at the Arts Student League, and soon became assistant to Sol Lewitt… In her early work, (between 1968 and 1972), Miyamoto was primarily a painter of large-scale bichromatic acrylic canvases, works that inflected and, in some ways, undermined formal systems with modest, organic painterly elements. In 1973, the year of her first gallery shows in New York and Italy, Miyamoto embarked on a major nail-and-string wall-based installation at MoMA—the elegant, path-breaking site-specific work which she had been refining for several years as she moved away from painting, and would become her signature work between 1972 and 1979.

opens today:“Report on the Construction of a Spaceship Module” curated by tranzit (at.tranzit.org) New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (5th Floor)New Museum’s fifth floor has been transformed into a simulated interior of a spaceship. On view in and around the spacecraft are 117 artworks, including video, sculpture, print, and installation, by artists hailing primarily from cities around Eastern Europe, notably Vienna, Prague, Budapest, Bucharest, and Bratislava. This ambitious exhibition is guest curated for the New Museum’s “Museum as Hub” program by tranzit, a network of autonomous but interconnected organizations based in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia.

opens today:

Report on the Construction of a Spaceship Module
 curated by tranzit (at.tranzit.org)
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (5th Floor)

New Museum’s fifth floor has been transformed into a simulated interior of a spaceship. On view in and around the spacecraft are 117 artworks, including video, sculpture, print, and installation, by artists hailing primarily from cities around Eastern Europe, notably Vienna, Prague, Budapest, Bucharest, and Bratislava. This ambitious exhibition is guest curated for the New Museum’s “Museum as Hub” program by tranzit, a network of autonomous but interconnected organizations based in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia.

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:JOMAR STATKUNGaris & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYCAn exhibition of Jomar Statkun’s complete work to date. The collection will be installed in the gallery’s downstairs space, leaving the upstairs empty until work is introduced through weekly “decorations” that will slowly transform the main space. Through participation and performance, visitors will be invited to the basement “Public Viewing Room” to interact with the artist as well as look at, examine, and handle the works of art. - thru Feb 23

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:

JOMAR STATKUN

Garis & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYC

An exhibition of Jomar Statkun’s complete work to date. The collection will be installed in the gallery’s downstairs space, leaving the upstairs empty until work is introduced through weekly “decorations” that will slowly transform the main space. Through participation and performance, visitors will be invited to the basement “Public Viewing Room” to interact with the artist as well as look at, examine, and handle the works of art. - thru Feb 23

just opened:“Meaning, Inc.” Michael Fullerton Greene Naftali Gallery, 526 W26th St., NYC (8th fl)The exhibition expands the artist’s ongoing investigation of media, technology, and justice with an exhibition that questions the social or civic relevance of art—and especially painting—in the age of information and mass media. Employing wall texts, lasers, large-scale screen prints, and classical oil portraits inspired by 18th Century painter Thomas Gainsborough, Fullerton approaches his exhibitions with an uncanny playfulness. Not limiting himself to one medium or mode of display, Fullerton uses every aspect of exhibition-making in thinking about visual implements of power. By mining the biographies of historical and contemporary figures at the forefront of media, Fullerton likewise highlights the rapid proliferation of data and its dissemination. - thru Feb 8

just opened:

Meaning, Inc.
 Michael Fullerton
 

Greene Naftali Gallery, 526 W26th St., NYC (8th fl)

The exhibition expands the artist’s ongoing investigation of media, technology, and justice with an exhibition that questions the social or civic relevance of art—and especially painting—in the age of information and mass media. Employing wall texts, lasers, large-scale screen prints, and classical oil portraits inspired by 18th Century painter Thomas Gainsborough, Fullerton approaches his exhibitions with an uncanny playfulness. Not limiting himself to one medium or mode of display, Fullerton uses every aspect of exhibition-making in thinking about visual implements of power. By mining the biographies of historical and contemporary figures at the forefront of media, Fullerton likewise highlights the rapid proliferation of data and its dissemination. - thru Feb 8

opens tomorrow, Jan 9, 6-8p:

Spoil
 Jessica Stoller
 
P.P.O.W Gallery, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)

Stoller uses clay and the grotesque as a vehicle to explore the constructed, often idealized world of femininity, gathering imagery across cultural lines and histories, often fixating on the subjugation of the female body. Porcelain is her primary media, a historically weighted material that is inevitably linked to desire, mystery and consumption. The sculptures in Spoil spill out of decorative materiality into the Rococo maximalist mentality of pageantry, pomp and artifice that are often overlooked as frivolous ploys.  Through the synthesis of the symbolic female, culturally, historically and bodily, Stoller allows feminist language to expand within her work leaving room for subversion, defiance and play. Stoller uses a myriad of techniques to create her highly detailed works. First, hand-building the porcelain forms and incorporating porcelain slip, or liquid clay to coat fabric which burns away through controlled firing, leaving draping lace and flesh-like fabric ribbons.  Stoller’s knowledge of the medium allows her to manipulate the clay creating  a wide-range of effects: piped cakes, dripping syrup and rows of spikes and interlocking chains undergo multiple firings to develop each richly colored surface.  The resulting works embody a powerful sense of oppositions which blur the lines between real and imitated, normal and abnormal, perceived beauty and the bodily abject. - thru Feb 8

closing soon, ends Jan 12:

Extreme Measures
 Chris Burden
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

Spanning a forty-year career and moving across mediums, “Extreme Measures” presents a selection of Burden’s work focused on weights and measures, boundaries and constraints, where physical and moral limits are called into question.

“As an artist, [Burden] was fast out of the gate, establishing his reputation with a series of exquisitely simple, often incendiary performances from 1971 to 1977. Many lasted only a few seconds, others for up to three weeks. But they tested will, discipline and endurance, sometimes to the point of real danger…  Few people saw Mr. Burden’s performances, but no matter: the best of them could be reduced to a vivid sentence or two that, once heard, stuck in the mind. By the mid-1970s, they formed a familiar litany of indelible acts and documentary photographs. After 54 performances, Mr. Burden succumbed to performance art’s primary occupational hazard: It was too grueling. He had always considered his performances sculptures, and now he turned to making sculptures that he saw as performances: feats or demonstrations that delved more deeply into reality with forms other than his body. His art-world visibility shrank because his efforts could no longer be distilled to an unforgettable sentence or two. They had to be experienced directly, which is what the New Museum’s spacious exhibition is all about.” - Roberta Smith, New York Times