nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Sept 4, 1-6p:

Made for Whites by Whites” and “Rescue
 Nick Cave
 
Jack Shainman Gallery, 513 W20th St., NYC
Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 W24th St., NYC

On view at 524 West 24th Street will be Cave’s body of work Rescue. The series comprises sculptures that incorporate found ceramic dogs sitting on furniture within elaborate grottos or dreamlike dens. Dogs have historically been associated with loyalty, class, breed, commitment, and protection. In the Rescues, Cave focuses on a single canine that has quite literally been rescued from destruction, very much like an adopted pet. These dogs become the benevolent guardians of their self-contained worlds, focusing the spotlight on the forgotten and discarded. Many of the works included in Made for Whites by Whites, on view at 513 West 20th Street, have formal similarities to the Rescues in that central found objects are presented within elaborate armatures built up with items from Cave’s familiar lexicon of ceramic birds and flowers, porcelain fruit, and copies of Capodimonte. However, the content is quite different. In Made for Whites by Whites, racially charged historical objects anchor the works such as the stereotypical representation of a black man with dark skin, big red lips, and white eyes in Untitled, 2014, or the Golliwog costumed mannequin in King of the Hill, 2014. These were once commonplace caricatures that infantilized and dehumanized the African American population. This project began when Cave found a container at a flea market shaped like the head of a black man and labeled ‘Spittoon.’ - thru Oct 11

Opens Tomorrow, Sept 4, 6-8p:“Denuded Lens” Roxy PaineMarianne Boesky Gallery,  509 W24th St., NYCFrom the Painting Machines, to the Replicants, to the Dendroids, Paine’s practice illuminates the aesthetic and conceptual paradoxes that lie at the heart of the contemporary condition, addressing the particular tension that arises when chaos and control, fact and artifice, the organic and the industrial, meet. At the center of this exhibition is Checkpoint, the most recent iteration of his latest series, the large-scale Dioramas. A room-sized vision of a generic airport security stop, Checkpoint presents a locale whose practical banality rests uneasily alongside the looming suggestion of larger social anxieties.  - thru Oct 18

Opens Tomorrow, Sept 4, 6-8p:

Denuded Lens
 Roxy Paine

Marianne Boesky Gallery,  509 W24th St., NYC

From the Painting Machines, to the Replicants, to the Dendroids, Paine’s practice illuminates the aesthetic and conceptual paradoxes that lie at the heart of the contemporary condition, addressing the particular tension that arises when chaos and control, fact and artifice, the organic and the industrial, meet. At the center of this exhibition is Checkpoint, the most recent iteration of his latest series, the large-scale Dioramas. A room-sized vision of a generic airport security stop, Checkpoint presents a locale whose practical banality rests uneasily alongside the looming suggestion of larger social anxieties.  - thru Oct 18

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Thurs, Sept 4, 1pm-6pm:

Oh Me, Oh My
 Nick Cave
 
Jack Shainman Gallery, 513 W20th St., NYC
Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 W24th St., NYC

Two shows of new work by Nick Cave, at both Jack Shainman Gallery locations, dedicated to gallery co-founder Claude Simard.

Cave will be also be discussing his new book, “Epitome,” with Creative Time chief curator Nato Thompson on September 10th at The New York Public Library

thru Sept 7:“Object Matter” Robert HeineckenThe Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCThis is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Sept 7:

Object Matter
 Robert Heinecken

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

This is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

Opens April 11:

Submerged Motherlands
 Swoon
 
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYC

Brooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago.

photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq

Opens Thurs, Apr 10, 6-8p:“Sideshow” Matthew Schreiber Johannes Vogt Gallery, 526 W26th St., NYC #205this first New York solo exhibition by Matthew Schreiber spans across both exhibition spaces of the gallery and combines works across varying mediums including light sculptures, holography, photography, and an immersive architectural intervention that features a laser diode installation and will take over the entire rear gallery.

Opens Thurs, Apr 10, 6-8p:

Sideshow
 Matthew Schreiber
 
Johannes Vogt Gallery, 526 W26th St., NYC #205

this first New York solo exhibition by Matthew Schreiber spans across both exhibition spaces of the gallery and combines works across varying mediums including light sculptures, holography, photography, and an immersive architectural intervention that features a laser diode installation and will take over the entire rear gallery.

thru Feb 2:“Woman To Go” Mathilde ter HeijneJack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYCpart of an ongoing traveling installation displaying postcards which can be taken for free. Each postcard shows a portrait of an unknown woman that lived between 1839 (the beginning of photography with Daguerreotypes) and the 1920s. On the message side is the biography of a known woman who was influential or extraordinary in her time. The pictures and biographies were collected from all over the world. The women whose biographies are known, all struggled for their individual goals in a world where men were predominant, where women didn’t have the right to vote or to own property, and only men were thought to be worth remembering. Most of these women have been forgotten and the many unknown women help us to remember the known. The postcards are to be taken for free in order to give people the opportunity to “take away” a female role model, or a little source of inspiration.”

thru Feb 2:

Woman To Go
 Mathilde ter Heijne

Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

part of an ongoing traveling installation displaying postcards which can be taken for free. Each postcard shows a portrait of an unknown woman that lived between 1839 (the beginning of photography with Daguerreotypes) and the 1920s. On the message side is the biography of a known woman who was influential or extraordinary in her time. The pictures and biographies were collected from all over the world. The women whose biographies are known, all struggled for their individual goals in a world where men were predominant, where women didn’t have the right to vote or to own property, and only men were thought to be worth remembering. Most of these women have been forgotten and the many unknown women help us to remember the known. The postcards are to be taken for free in order to give people the opportunity to “take away” a female role model, or a little source of inspiration.”

opens Fri, Jan 31, 6-8p:KAZUKO MIYAMOTOINVISIBLE-EXPORTS Gallery, 89 Eldridge St., NYCthe first solo exhibition in New York, in over a decade, of work by Kazuko Miyamoto, a preeminent feminist figure of minimalism. Born in wartime Tokyo, Miyamoto moved to New York in 1964, studied at the Arts Student League, and soon became assistant to Sol Lewitt… In her early work, (between 1968 and 1972), Miyamoto was primarily a painter of large-scale bichromatic acrylic canvases, works that inflected and, in some ways, undermined formal systems with modest, organic painterly elements. In 1973, the year of her first gallery shows in New York and Italy, Miyamoto embarked on a major nail-and-string wall-based installation at MoMA—the elegant, path-breaking site-specific work which she had been refining for several years as she moved away from painting, and would become her signature work between 1972 and 1979.

opens Fri, Jan 31, 6-8p:

KAZUKO MIYAMOTO

INVISIBLE-EXPORTS Gallery, 89 Eldridge St., NYC

the first solo exhibition in New York, in over a decade, of work by Kazuko Miyamoto, a preeminent feminist figure of minimalism. Born in wartime Tokyo, Miyamoto moved to New York in 1964, studied at the Arts Student League, and soon became assistant to Sol Lewitt… In her early work, (between 1968 and 1972), Miyamoto was primarily a painter of large-scale bichromatic acrylic canvases, works that inflected and, in some ways, undermined formal systems with modest, organic painterly elements. In 1973, the year of her first gallery shows in New York and Italy, Miyamoto embarked on a major nail-and-string wall-based installation at MoMA—the elegant, path-breaking site-specific work which she had been refining for several years as she moved away from painting, and would become her signature work between 1972 and 1979.

opens today:“Report on the Construction of a Spaceship Module” curated by tranzit (at.tranzit.org) New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (5th Floor)New Museum’s fifth floor has been transformed into a simulated interior of a spaceship. On view in and around the spacecraft are 117 artworks, including video, sculpture, print, and installation, by artists hailing primarily from cities around Eastern Europe, notably Vienna, Prague, Budapest, Bucharest, and Bratislava. This ambitious exhibition is guest curated for the New Museum’s “Museum as Hub” program by tranzit, a network of autonomous but interconnected organizations based in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia.

opens today:

Report on the Construction of a Spaceship Module
 curated by tranzit (at.tranzit.org)
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (5th Floor)

New Museum’s fifth floor has been transformed into a simulated interior of a spaceship. On view in and around the spacecraft are 117 artworks, including video, sculpture, print, and installation, by artists hailing primarily from cities around Eastern Europe, notably Vienna, Prague, Budapest, Bucharest, and Bratislava. This ambitious exhibition is guest curated for the New Museum’s “Museum as Hub” program by tranzit, a network of autonomous but interconnected organizations based in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia.

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:JOMAR STATKUNGaris & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYCAn exhibition of Jomar Statkun’s complete work to date. The collection will be installed in the gallery’s downstairs space, leaving the upstairs empty until work is introduced through weekly “decorations” that will slowly transform the main space. Through participation and performance, visitors will be invited to the basement “Public Viewing Room” to interact with the artist as well as look at, examine, and handle the works of art. - thru Feb 23

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:

JOMAR STATKUN

Garis & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYC

An exhibition of Jomar Statkun’s complete work to date. The collection will be installed in the gallery’s downstairs space, leaving the upstairs empty until work is introduced through weekly “decorations” that will slowly transform the main space. Through participation and performance, visitors will be invited to the basement “Public Viewing Room” to interact with the artist as well as look at, examine, and handle the works of art. - thru Feb 23