nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

recommended:

The Real Estate Show, Was Then: 1980

James Fuentes Gallery, 55 Delancey St., NYC

a historical exhibition revisiting Colab’s infamous 1980 “The Real Estate Show” with original archived artworks. “During the late 1970s and early 1980s the art world underwent rapid change. More and more artists found inspiration by engaging the real world while simultaneously discovering the power of banding together either to confront or circumvent the established order… on New Years’ Eve 1980 a group of Colab members and friends started the new decade off with a bang by squatting an empty, city-owned building on Delancey Street and mounting ‘The Real Estate Show,’ an exhibition about greed, gentrification, eviction, and dislocation. Although the police quickly shut down the show, the guerrilla exhibition attracted so much media attention that as a compromise the city offered the artists the use of another abandoned building on nearby Rivington Street.” (Alan Moore and Marc Miller, 98Bowery.com)

coming this February:

City as Canvas
 Graffiti Art from the Martin Wong Collection
 
Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Ave., NYC

The first time exhibition of works from the expansive street art collection of Martin Wong.

Martin Wong, an East Village artist and collector of graffiti art, amassed a treasure trove of hundreds of works on paper and canvas—in aerosol, ink, and other mediums. Wong, who died of AIDS in 1999, donated his collection to the City Museum in 1994. The artists, including Keith Haring, Lee Quiñones, LADY PINK, and FUTURA 2000, were seminal figures in an artistic movement that spawned a worldwide phenomenon, altering music, fashion, and popular visual culture. The exhibition also includes photographs of graffiti writing long erased from subways and buildings. runs from February 4th through August 24th, 2014.

recently opened:“Nenuphar” Terry AdkinsSalon 94 (2 locations), 243 Bowery & 1 Freeman Alley, NYCWith his first New York gallery solo show in ten years, Adkins presents Nenuphar, a recital that treats the legacies of George Washington Carver (1864-1943) and Yves Klein (1928-1962), focusing on unfamiliar aspects of both men. Adkins is an interdisciplinary artist and musician known for engaging with historical narratives, often reinventing and reintroducing biographies through installation based experiences called ”recitals”. His approach to art making is similar to that of a composer, and his installations are conceived as scores that punctuate and demarcate space, creating interplay among pieces in different media. - thru Jan 11

recently opened:

Nenuphar
 Terry Adkins

Salon 94 (2 locations), 243 Bowery & 1 Freeman Alley, NYC

With his first New York gallery solo show in ten years, Adkins presents Nenuphar, a recital that treats the legacies of George Washington Carver (1864-1943) and Yves Klein (1928-1962), focusing on unfamiliar aspects of both men. Adkins is an interdisciplinary artist and musician known for engaging with historical narratives, often reinventing and reintroducing biographies through installation based experiences called ”recitals”. His approach to art making is similar to that of a composer, and his installations are conceived as scores that punctuate and demarcate space, creating interplay among pieces in different media. - thru Jan 11

ongoing thru Jan 12:

The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926–1938
 Magritte

MoMA, 11 W53rd St., NYC (5th/6th Aves)

Bringing together some 80 paintings, collages, and objects, along with a selection of photographs, periodicals, and early commercial work, the exhibition is the first to focus exclusively on the breakthrough Surrealist years of René Magritte, creator of some of the 20th century’s most extraordinary images. Beginning in 1926, when Magritte first aimed to create paintings that would, in his words, “challenge the real world,” and concluding in 1938—a historically and biographically significant moment just prior to the outbreak of World War II—the exhibition traces central strategies and themes from the most inventive and experimental period in the artist’s prolific career. Displacement, transformation, metamorphosis, the “misnaming” of objects, and the representation of visions seen in half-waking states are among Magritte’s innovative image-making tactics during these essential years.

thru Sept 2:

The Civil War and American Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., NYC (at 82nd Street)

"This major loan exhibition considers how American artists responded to the Civil War and its aftermath. Landscapes and genre scenes—more than traditional history paintings—captured the war’s impact on the American psyche. The works of art on display trace the trajectory of the conflict and express the intense emotions that it provoked: unease as war became inevitable, optimism that a single battle might end the struggle, growing realization that fighting would be prolonged, enthusiasm and worries alike surrounding emancipation, and concerns about how to reunify the nation after a period of grievous division. The exhibition proposes significant new readings of many familiar masterworks—some sixty paintings and eighteen photographs created between 1852 and 1877—including outstanding landscapes by Frederic E. Church and Sanford R. Gifford, paintings of life on the battlefront and the home front by Winslow Homer and Eastman Johnson, and photographs by Timothy H. O’Sullivan and George N. Barnard."

thru July 28th:

John Singer Sargent : Watercolors”

Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY

This landmark exhibition unites for the first time the John Singer Sargent watercolors acquired by the Brooklyn Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the early twentieth century. The culmination of a yearlong collaborative study by both museums, John Singer Sargent Watercolors explores the watercolor practice that has traditionally been viewed as a tangential facet of Sargent’s art making. The ninety-three pieces on display provide a once-in-a-generation opportunity to view a broad range of the artist’s finest production in the medium.

recently opened: “The Impressionist Line from Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec” Drawings and Prints from the ClarkThe Frick Collection, 1 East 70th St., NYCThis exhibition presents a selection of nineteenth-century French drawings and prints by Millet, Courbet, Degas, Manet, Pissarro, Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec, and other masters. Ranging widely in subject matter and technique and spanning the entire second half of the nineteenth century, these works represent the diverse interests of Realist, Impressionist, and Post-Impressionist artists in a rapidly changing world. Graphite and charcoal drawings of classically idealized nudes exhibit the virtuoso finish and illusionism long championed by academic tradition while rapidly executed sketches present more candid and provocative renderings of the body. Luminous pastels and watercolors capture impressions of city and country, and lively etchings and vivid color lithographs convey the spectacle and atmosphere of modern life. Populating these images are peasants, performers, racehorses, and mythological goddesses. Settings vary from the French countryside and far-flung islands to Parisian cafés and dancehalls, shifting back and forth between labor and leisure, highlife and low.

recently opened:

The Impressionist Line from Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec
 Drawings and Prints from the Clark

The Frick Collection, 1 East 70th St., NYC

This exhibition presents a selection of nineteenth-century French drawings and prints by Millet, Courbet, Degas, Manet, Pissarro, Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec, and other masters. Ranging widely in subject matter and technique and spanning the entire second half of the nineteenth century, these works represent the diverse interests of Realist, Impressionist, and Post-Impressionist artists in a rapidly changing world. Graphite and charcoal drawings of classically idealized nudes exhibit the virtuoso finish and illusionism long championed by academic tradition while rapidly executed sketches present more candid and provocative renderings of the body. Luminous pastels and watercolors capture impressions of city and country, and lively etchings and vivid color lithographs convey the spectacle and atmosphere of modern life. Populating these images are peasants, performers, racehorses, and mythological goddesses. Settings vary from the French countryside and far-flung islands to Parisian cafés and dancehalls, shifting back and forth between labor and leisure, highlife and low.

Recently Opened: “Amazing Grace” Nari WardNew Museum’s Studio 231, 231 Bowery, NYCThe work is composed of 310 abandoned strollers (collected by the artist from the streets of his neighborhood) surrounded by a field of flattened fire hoses. It is accompanied by a recording of gospel singer Mahalia Jackson singing “Amazing Grace,” suffusing the installation with an uplifting and reverential tone. The objects, in various states of disrepair, speak of the lives of the children they once carried as well as their appropriation by the homeless men and women who would utilize them to transport their own scavenged possessions. Amazing Grace captures the sense of loss, adaptation, and hopefulness that characterized Ward’s experience of New York City in 1993. Originally installed in an abandoned firehouse at 301 West 141st Street in Harlem from September to December 1993. - thru April 21

Recently Opened:

Amazing Grace
 Nari Ward

New Museum’s Studio 231, 231 Bowery, NYC

The work is composed of 310 abandoned strollers (collected by the artist from the streets of his neighborhood) surrounded by a field of flattened fire hoses. It is accompanied by a recording of gospel singer Mahalia Jackson singing “Amazing Grace,” suffusing the installation with an uplifting and reverential tone. The objects, in various states of disrepair, speak of the lives of the children they once carried as well as their appropriation by the homeless men and women who would utilize them to transport their own scavenged possessions. Amazing Grace captures the sense of loss, adaptation, and hopefulness that characterized Ward’s experience of New York City in 1993. Originally installed in an abandoned firehouse at 301 West 141st Street in Harlem from September to December 1993. - thru April 21

David Hammons, In the Hood, 1993. Athletic sweatshirt hood with wire, 23 x 10 x 5 in Opens Feb 13: “NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star”New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYCthe exhibition looks at art made and exhibited in New York over the course of one year. Centering on 1993, the exhibition is conceived as a time capsule, an experiment in collective memory that attempts to capture a specific moment at the intersection of art, pop culture, and politics… brings together a number of iconic and lesser-known artworks that serve as both artifacts from a pivotal moment in the New York art world and as key markers in the cultural history of the city. features over seventy-five artists and will span all five gallery floors of the New Museum.

David Hammons, In the Hood, 1993. Athletic sweatshirt hood with wire, 23 x 10 x 5 in

Opens Feb 13:

NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star

New Museum
, 235 Bowery, NYC

the exhibition looks at art made and exhibited in New York over the course of one year. Centering on 1993, the exhibition is conceived as a time capsule, an experiment in collective memory that attempts to capture a specific moment at the intersection of art, pop culture, and politics… brings together a number of iconic and lesser-known artworks that serve as both artifacts from a pivotal moment in the New York art world and as key markers in the cultural history of the city. features over seventy-five artists and will span all five gallery floors of the New Museum.

Opens Sept 19:“Come Closer: Art Around the Bowery (1969–1989)” curated by Ethan SwanNew Museum, 235 Bowery, NYCDrawing upon the New Museum’s Bowery Artist Tribute archive and the online archive of Marc H. Miller, 98bowery.com, this exhibition features original artwork, ephemera, and performance documentation by over twenty artists who lived and worked on or near the Bowery in New York.  - thru Jan 6
also, please join us in discussion:How does New York’s art scene in 2012 compare to the celebrated decades of yore?

Opens Sept 19:

Come Closer: Art Around the Bowery (1969–1989)
 curated by Ethan Swan

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

Drawing upon the New Museum’s Bowery Artist Tribute archive and the online archive of Marc H. Miller, 98bowery.com, this exhibition features original artwork, ephemera, and performance documentation by over twenty artists who lived and worked on or near the Bowery in New York.  - thru Jan 6

also, please join us in discussion:
How does New York’s art scene in 2012 compare to the celebrated decades of yore?