nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens tonight, Oct 9, 6-8p:“Dull Knife Fight” Jesse Littlefield Zieher Smith & Horton Gallery, 516 W20th St, NYCin his New York solo debut Littlefield presents a series of paintings that merge the immediacy of screen-printing and collage with the expression of gestural abstraction. Preferring the limited palette, matte surface, and viscosity of screening ink instead of paint, the artist uses image-free silkscreens to squeegee color onto swaths of lightweight muslin. Once a sufficient amount of painterly material is accumulated, he cuts, manipulates, and applies the fabric shapes to form geometric compositions. - thru Nov 8

Opens tonight, Oct 9, 6-8p:

Dull Knife Fight
 Jesse Littlefield
 
Zieher Smith & Horton Gallery, 516 W20th St, NYC

in his New York solo debut Littlefield presents a series of paintings that merge the immediacy of screen-printing and collage with the expression of gestural abstraction. Preferring the limited palette, matte surface, and viscosity of screening ink instead of paint, the artist uses image-free silkscreens to squeegee color onto swaths of lightweight muslin. Once a sufficient amount of painterly material is accumulated, he cuts, manipulates, and applies the fabric shapes to form geometric compositions. - thru Nov 8

opens Fri, May 23, 6-8p:

Geo Land
 Alain Biltereyst
 
Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

Belgium-based painter Alain Biltereyst’s small works on plywood are concerned with everyday, contemporary life. The artist is inspired by geometric forms that he sees on a daily basis, such as logos on currency, advertising on the sides of trucks, and fences against a landscape. He strives to interpret this ‘Geo Land’ into works that are “as simple and poetic as possible.” Formal repetition and color choices reflect the artist’s background in graphic design and fascination with commercial and other urban signs, where the lines between culture and subculture are blurred. Beneath the hard edge geometry of each composition, lies a painterly gesture, implying a depth in the otherwise flat composition. - thru June 22

opens tomorrow, Jan 24, 6-9p:“Accumulations: Drawings & Notebooks” Owen Schuh Schema Projects, 92 St Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn, NY“My work seeks to illuminate the entwining relations between embodied mind, mathematics, and the physical world. My artwork is structured by mathematical functions, which though relatively simple in nature yield outcomes of surprising organic complexity. I have created this work by hand using, at most, the aid of a pocket calculator.” - Owen Schuh

opens tomorrow, Jan 24, 6-9p:

Accumulations: Drawings & Notebooks
 Owen Schuh
 
Schema Projects, 92 St Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn, NY

“My work seeks to illuminate the entwining relations between embodied mind, mathematics, and the physical world. My artwork is structured by mathematical functions, which though relatively simple in nature yield outcomes of surprising organic complexity. I have created this work by hand using, at most, the aid of a pocket calculator.” - Owen Schuh

opens tonight, Thurs, Jan 23, 6-8p:“INBETWEEN” Serena Mitnik-MillerJoshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St., NYCWorking primarily in watercolor on paper, Mitnik-Miller’s practice centers on the repetition of patterns and shapes. “Painting and creating has been a part of my life from a very young age. Painting is the most calming of my endeavors, which is most enjoyable, and makes me happy.” - Serena Mitnik-Miller

opens tonight, Thurs, Jan 23, 6-8p:

INBETWEEN
 Serena Mitnik-Miller

Joshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St., NYC

Working primarily in watercolor on paper, Mitnik-Miller’s practice centers on the repetition of patterns and shapes. “Painting and creating has been a part of my life from a very young age. Painting is the most calming of my endeavors, which is most enjoyable, and makes me happy.” - Serena Mitnik-Miller

thru Jan 26:“Analogue Future” Russell Tyler DCKT Contemporary, 21 Orchard St., NYCInfluenced by the crude digital landscapes of outdated 8-bit graphics and the utopian visions of 1960s and 1970s science fiction films, Tyler’s heavily impastoed oil paintings are the legacy of unmet hopes and promised ideals.

thru Jan 26:

Analogue Future
 Russell Tyler
 
DCKT Contemporary, 21 Orchard St., NYC

Influenced by the crude digital landscapes of outdated 8-bit graphics and the utopian visions of 1960s and 1970s science fiction films, Tyler’s heavily impastoed oil paintings are the legacy of unmet hopes and promised ideals.

opens tonight, Jan 11, 6-8p:

Stairs and Ramps
 Todd Chilton

Feature Inc Gallery, 131 Allen St., NYC

Todd Chilton’s relatively small and intensely colored abstract oil paintings layer patterns that are bounded by the edge of the canvas, leading you to believe these paintings are easily graspable. The exhibition title, Stairs and Ramps, references the flat and manipulated space of computer games and, as well, ways to move by foot or wheelchair through architectural space. At the same time, it is also just two ways to graphically read a triangle, the shape that is the basis of the patterns in most of these paintings. Titles of the paintings point to alternate readings of what may be initially perceived. Geometry is undermined by handedness.

recently opened:“Change and Horizontals” Sean ScullyThe Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC$5 (admission is free on Thursdays, 6–8pm)This intensely focused survey comprises Sean Scully’s acrylic, ink, graphite, and masking-tape drawings from 1974–75—presented together for the first time in over 30 years—as well as two large-scale paintings from the same period and one of the artist’s personal notebooks. Scully’s maturation as a painter can easily be traced back to innovations in his early drawings. These drawings are marked by refined geometries that re-imagine the history of abstraction as an art rooted in experience—“something felt and something seen,” as the artist has said. Executed in London and New York City respectively, the Change and Horizontals drawings, along with their preparatory sketches and never-before-seen experimental typewriter drawings from the same period, highlight Scully’s core concern with line and color’s relation to place. Viewed together, the works chart an evolution of composition and gesture that provides unique insight into this artist’s singular aesthetic. This New York exhibition is the last stop on a tour that included the UK, Germany, and Italy. - thru Nov 3

recently opened:

Change and Horizontals
 Sean Scully

The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC
$5 (admission is free on Thursdays, 6–8pm)

This intensely focused survey comprises Sean Scully’s acrylic, ink, graphite, and masking-tape drawings from 1974–75—presented together for the first time in over 30 years—as well as two large-scale paintings from the same period and one of the artist’s personal notebooks. Scully’s maturation as a painter can easily be traced back to innovations in his early drawings. These drawings are marked by refined geometries that re-imagine the history of abstraction as an art rooted in experience—“something felt and something seen,” as the artist has said. Executed in London and New York City respectively, the Change and Horizontals drawings, along with their preparatory sketches and never-before-seen experimental typewriter drawings from the same period, highlight Scully’s core concern with line and color’s relation to place. Viewed together, the works chart an evolution of composition and gesture that provides unique insight into this artist’s singular aesthetic. This New York exhibition is the last stop on a tour that included the UK, Germany, and Italy. - thru Nov 3

opens Wed, July 31, 6-9p:“Multiple / Universal” Hans Baumann, Christian Berman, Jon Blank, Palma Blank, Ted Gahl,  Field Kallop, Karl Larocca,  Lyman Richardson, Kristen Schiele, Oliver WardenStorefront Bushwick, 16 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn NY (original location)“Multiple / Universal deals with the role of art and abstraction as a universal engine for self-differentiation and universal communication in the age of the internet. The artists in the show navigate the visual landscape by material experimentation, geometry, and color play in ways that vividly illuminate individual preference and experience.  These works exhibit the connectedness of a universally vibrating network.  The underpinnings of this curatorial effort lie in the basic study of quantum physics. We live in a time where humanity is approaching a confluence between universal electronic consciousness (the internet) and an inchoate but growing understanding of the way that energy and consciousness are drawn from a universal field. How do easy access to information and the shift away from a mechanical view of the universe affect abstraction?” - thru Aug 25

opens Wed, July 31, 6-9p:

Multiple / Universal
 Hans Baumann, Christian Berman,
 Jon Blank, Palma Blank, Ted Gahl,
 Field Kallop, Karl Larocca,
 Lyman Richardson, Kristen Schiele,
 Oliver Warden

Storefront Bushwick, 16 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn NY (original location)

“Multiple / Universal deals with the role of art and abstraction as a universal engine for self-differentiation and universal communication in the age of the internet. The artists in the show navigate the visual landscape by material experimentation, geometry, and color play in ways that vividly illuminate individual preference and experience.  These works exhibit the connectedness of a universally vibrating network.  The underpinnings of this curatorial effort lie in the basic study of quantum physics. We live in a time where humanity is approaching a confluence between universal electronic consciousness (the internet) and an inchoate but growing understanding of the way that energy and consciousness are drawn from a universal field. How do easy access to information and the shift away from a mechanical view of the universe affect abstraction?” - thru Aug 25

Opens Tomorrow, June 13, 6-8p:“Smuggling the Sun” Eamon Ore-GironNicelle Beauchene Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC (bt Bowery & Chrystie)Likening the return to elemental abstraction to the revisiting of acoustic instruments from electronically generated sound, Ore-Giron references ethnomusicology as a conceptual influence. Ore-Giron’s intimately scaled paintings reference a meticulous approach to the handmade, using a combination of raw linen and a palette rooted in tones of red and orange to lend an intrinsically organic feeling to his otherwise minimal compositions. - thru July 12

Opens Tomorrow, June 13, 6-8p:

Smuggling the Sun
 Eamon Ore-Giron

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC (bt Bowery & Chrystie)

Likening the return to elemental abstraction to the revisiting of acoustic instruments from electronically generated sound, Ore-Giron references ethnomusicology as a conceptual influence. Ore-Giron’s intimately scaled paintings reference a meticulous approach to the handmade, using a combination of raw linen and a palette rooted in tones of red and orange to lend an intrinsically organic feeling to his otherwise minimal compositions. - thru July 12

Just Opened: “Building Blocks” Jeffrey GibsonMarc Straus Gallery, 299 Grand St., NYCGibson’s artwork intermingles elements of traditional Native American art with contemporary artistic references. Thus powwow regalia, 19th parfleche containers, and drums are seamlessly merged with elements of Modernist geometric abstraction, Minimalism, and Pattern and Decoration. Here there is an echo of Frank Stella, Josef Albers, and Lucio Fontana – canonized in our current dialogue which has little or no inclusion of Native American art which Gibson provides comparable weight and equivalence. - thru Dec 23

Just Opened:

Building Blocks
 Jeffrey Gibson

Marc Straus Gallery, 299 Grand St., NYC

Gibson’s artwork intermingles elements of traditional Native American art with contemporary artistic references. Thus powwow regalia, 19th parfleche containers, and drums are seamlessly merged with elements of Modernist geometric abstraction, Minimalism, and Pattern and Decoration. Here there is an echo of Frank Stella, Josef Albers, and Lucio Fontana – canonized in our current dialogue which has little or no inclusion of Native American art which Gibson provides comparable weight and equivalence. - thru Dec 23