nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens Sept 10:“A New Surrealism, Works from the 1930’s” Joseph CornellVan Doren Waxter Gallery, 23 East 73rd St., NYCThe exhibition features small-scale collages of the 1930’s, Joseph Cornell’s first forays into the found object assemblages for which he became known. Other exhibition highlights include box compositions, whimsical pocket-sized pill box creations from Cornell’s initial experimentation with objects and containers that lead to the shadow box. These works give an intimate look into the imaginative vision of this uniquely self-taught American surrealist. Cornell’s idiosyncratic method developed as he visited art galleries and second-hand book sellers in Manhattan’s mercantile district, where he acquired a collection of materials and ephemera. His early collections of memorabilia and curiosities were integral to his creative process. The cultivated and curated collections, which Cornell would use to compose his assemblages, drew from his eclectic interests that ranged from literature, music and dance, maps and science, to a fascination with Hollywood and Vaudeville and to the spiritual theories of Christian Science, which the artist first embraced in the 1920’s. Cornell is widely characterized as reclusive, as he seldom ventured far from the Utopia Parkway, Queens, New York home he shared with his mother and disabled brother. - thru Oct 31

Opens Sept 10:

A New Surrealism, Works from the 1930’s
 Joseph Cornell

Van Doren Waxter Gallery, 23 East 73rd St., NYC

The exhibition features small-scale collages of the 1930’s, Joseph Cornell’s first forays into the found object assemblages for which he became known. Other exhibition highlights include box compositions, whimsical pocket-sized pill box creations from Cornell’s initial experimentation with objects and containers that lead to the shadow box. These works give an intimate look into the imaginative vision of this uniquely self-taught American surrealist. Cornell’s idiosyncratic method developed as he visited art galleries and second-hand book sellers in Manhattan’s mercantile district, where he acquired a collection of materials and ephemera. His early collections of memorabilia and curiosities were integral to his creative process. The cultivated and curated collections, which Cornell would use to compose his assemblages, drew from his eclectic interests that ranged from literature, music and dance, maps and science, to a fascination with Hollywood and Vaudeville and to the spiritual theories of Christian Science, which the artist first embraced in the 1920’s. Cornell is widely characterized as reclusive, as he seldom ventured far from the Utopia Parkway, Queens, New York home he shared with his mother and disabled brother. - thru Oct 31

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Thurs, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Drawings
 Do Ho Suh
 
Lehmann Maupin, 40 W26th St., NYC
Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie St., NYC

an exhibition of new works by renowned Korean artist Do Ho Suh. On display at both 540 West 26th Street and 201 Chrystie Street, the exhibition will highlight the significant role and varied forms drawing plays in Suh’s oeuvre. This two-part show will feature the range of his works on paper, including drawings using pencil, pen, ink, and watercolor, his unique “thread” drawings, as well as his large-scale rubbings. Primarily known for his room-scale installations made of transparent fabric that recreate spaces in which he has lived, the artist has consistently utilized drawing throughout his career to explore and develop relationships between common themes of his practice including notions of home, physical space, displacement, identity, and memory. A focus of this exhibition, and Suh’s most elaborate use of drawing to date, is his Rubbing/Loving Project. Here Suh painstakingly covered the flat walls and three-dimensional fixtures of the interior and exterior of architectural spaces that hold great personal, cultural, or historic significance to him with vellum and rubbed each surface with colored pencil or graphite.

closing Sunday:“PLEH” Gobby, Nicholas Buffon, Allegra CrowtherShoot The Lobster, 138 Eldridge St., NYC“in Pleh, three very different artists—Gobby, Nick Buffon, Allegra Crowther—take up the onanistic tedium and thrills of obsession and boredom in dispirited urban desolation, a context familiar to New Yorkers resigned to spend long summer weeks in the city. Curator Alexander Shulan, who directs STL—the austere Chinatown satellite of Chelsea’s Martos Gallery—presents a witty salon-style hanging of industrious and psychedelic comic-book illustrations and alluringly sloppy sculptural tableaux. The exhibition weirdly reminisces a certain generation of 1990s cable television cartoons—Rocco’s Modern Life or the more adult-oriented Duckman that present often-doomed, neurotic characters as disempowered subjects in a mechanistic, indifferent universe.” - ARTFORUM

closing Sunday:

PLEH
 Gobby, Nicholas Buffon, Allegra Crowther

Shoot The Lobster, 138 Eldridge St., NYC

“in Pleh, three very different artists—Gobby, Nick Buffon, Allegra Crowther—take up the onanistic tedium and thrills of obsession and boredom in dispirited urban desolation, a context familiar to New Yorkers resigned to spend long summer weeks in the city. Curator Alexander Shulan, who directs STL—the austere Chinatown satellite of Chelsea’s Martos Gallery—presents a witty salon-style hanging of industrious and psychedelic comic-book illustrations and alluringly sloppy sculptural tableaux. The exhibition weirdly reminisces a certain generation of 1990s cable television cartoons—Rocco’s Modern Life or the more adult-oriented Duckman that present often-doomed, neurotic characters as disempowered subjects in a mechanistic, indifferent universe.” - ARTFORUM

newly opened:

All this happened, more or less
 Elizabeth Glaessner
 
P.P.O.W Gallery, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)

Glaessner combines familiar objects with misunderstood and idiosyncratic portraits, often laden with humor that counterpoint her macabre imagery. An exploration of memory, personal history and ritual, Glaessner’s work questions the way in which we relate to and envision our past. Her most recent paintings depict a highly detailed mythology of post-human existence on earth that features anthropomorphic, gelatinous figures in familiar, yet toxic, landscapes. These organic creatures appear as if born from natural forms, like tree trunks and rock formations, in attempt to reconstruct lost histories through the detritus left behind. - thru Aug 15

recommended: opening tonight in 2 locations, 6-8p:“ANOTHER LOOK at DETROIT: PARTS 1 and 2” curated by Todd Levin  Marianne Boesky Gallery, 509 W24th St., NYCMarlborough Chelsea Gallery, 545 W25th St., NYCA joint project between Marianne Boesky Gallery and Marlborough Chelsea, Another Look at Detroit presents works and objects by over fifty artists, designers, and cultural contributors. The focus of this exhibition is the city of Detroit as a creative center, historically through to today. Spanning a period of 150 years, and taking place at both galleries’ Chelsea spaces, this exhibition is by no means a comprehensive survey. Rather, Another Look at Detroit intends to portray a vision as sprawling and complex as the biography of the city itself.pictured: Diego Rivera, Edsel B. Ford, 1932, Oil on canvas

recommended: opening tonight in 2 locations, 6-8p:

ANOTHER LOOK at DETROIT: PARTS 1 and 2
 curated by Todd Levin
 
Marianne Boesky Gallery, 509 W24th St., NYC
Marlborough Chelsea Gallery, 545 W25th St., NYC

A joint project between Marianne Boesky Gallery and Marlborough Chelsea, Another Look at Detroit presents works and objects by over fifty artists, designers, and cultural contributors. The focus of this exhibition is the city of Detroit as a creative center, historically through to today. Spanning a period of 150 years, and taking place at both galleries’ Chelsea spaces, this exhibition is by no means a comprehensive survey. Rather, Another Look at Detroit intends to portray a vision as sprawling and complex as the biography of the city itself.

pictured: Diego Rivera, Edsel B. Ford, 1932, Oil on canvas

opens tonight, 6-8p:

Sargent’s Daughters
 
Sargent’s Daughters Gallery, 179 E. Broadway, NYC

An exhibition of works by 40 women artists exploring the legacy of John Singer Sargent: “When we consider the influence of Sargent on a later generation of artists the question of this participation remains. What has Sargent’s influence on women artists been?  The wide range of artists who react to his work includes sculptors, photographers, painters and installation artists— each drawing on different aspects of his work.”

artists: L.C. Armstrong, Sarah Awad, Whitney Bedford, Ellen Brooks, Rebecca Campbell, Jordan Casteel, Holly Coulis, Zoe Crosher, Jennifer Dalton, Inka Essenhigh, Katie Fischer, Natalie Frank, Joy, Garnett, Orly Genger, Elizabeth Glaessner, Isca Greenfield-Sanders, Jenna Gribbon, Nora Griffin, Jeila Gueramian, Tamara Gonzales, Ellen Harvey, Brad Jones, Field Kallop, Jemima Kirke, Marcia Kure, Saira McLaren, Jesse Mockrin, Kristine Moran, Caris Reid, Jackie Saccoccio, Sandi Slone, Jessica Stoller, Emily Sudd, Betty Tompkins​, Michelle Vaughan, Emily Weiner, Jessica Williams, Robin Williams, Amy Wilson, Letha Wilson

pictured:


Rebecca Campbell, Call her green and the winters cannot fade her., 2012 oil on canvas


Amy Wilson, We are Connected by Light, 2014, needle lace

opens tonight, Wed, June 18, 6-8p:

Leaps into the Void: Shamanism, Meditation, Transcendence, Oblivion”
 Gwyn Joy, Sky Kim, Michael Maxwell,
 Joe Nanashe, Phoebe Rathmell
 
Garis & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYC

a group exhibition united by the philosophical underpinnings and practical objectives of each artist’s own practice in addressing concepts related to meditation and altered mental states, physical and mental transcendence and Eastern and Western belief systems related to cycles of life.

opens Sat, June 14, 6-9p:“This is what sculpture looks like” Rachel Beach, Caitlin Cherry, Monica Cook,  Diana Cooper, Molly Crabapple, Daria Irincheeva,  Natalie Jeremijenko, Saeri Kiritani, Joanna Malinowska,  Michelle Matson, Rachel Mason, Esperanza Mayobre,  Brenna Murphy, Kate Ostler, Shinique Smith, Katie Torn Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYC“There are too many painting shows. There aren’t enough sculpture shows. We are fixing that.”

opens Sat, June 14, 6-9p:

This is what sculpture looks like
 Rachel Beach, Caitlin Cherry, Monica Cook,
 Diana Cooper, Molly Crabapple, Daria Irincheeva,
 Natalie Jeremijenko, Saeri Kiritani, Joanna Malinowska,
 Michelle Matson, Rachel Mason, Esperanza Mayobre,
 Brenna Murphy, Kate Ostler, Shinique Smith, Katie Torn
 
Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYC

“There are too many painting shows. There aren’t enough sculpture shows. We are fixing that.”

opens tomorrow, May 25, 6-8p:“Vintage Violence” curated by Monya Rowe and George Rush Monya Rowe Gallery, 34 Orchard St., NYCfeaturing work that explores violence in complex and often personal ways.artists: Nayland Blake, Richard Bosman, Angela Dufresne, Carroll Dunham, Judy Glantzman, Nancy Grossman, Lyle Ashton Harris, Vera Iliatova, Tony Matelli, Norman Paris, Dasha Shishkin, Tommy White

opens tomorrow, May 25, 6-8p:

Vintage Violence
 curated by Monya Rowe and George Rush
 
Monya Rowe Gallery, 34 Orchard St., NYC

featuring work that explores violence in complex and often personal ways.

artists: Nayland Blake, Richard Bosman, Angela Dufresne, Carroll Dunham, Judy Glantzman, Nancy Grossman, Lyle Ashton Harris, Vera Iliatova, Tony Matelli, Norman Paris, Dasha Shishkin, Tommy White

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:“Figure Studies” Walter RobinsonLynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYCKnown for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:

Figure Studies
 Walter Robinson

Lynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYC

Known for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.