nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Fall 2014 Editors Picktomorrow, Sunday, Sept 20, 6-9p:Inauguration of new Lower East Side location of 3 former Brooklyn-based Galleries Halsey Hathaway @ Rawson Projects“TWO TWO ONE” @ Regina Rex Gallery Group Show @ (harbor) gallery221 Madison St., NYC (map)Regina Rex presents new projects by Corey Escoto, Dave Hardy, EJ Hauser and David Stein that explore the underlying potential of their new space. Rawson Projects presents a solo exhibition of paintings by Halsey Hathaway. (harbor) gallery will be producing an ongoing program of rogue events and challenging installations, kicking off with a display of over forty artworks by a significant range of artists.

Fall 2014 Editors Pick
tomorrow, Sunday, Sept 20, 6-9p:

Inauguration of new Lower East Side location of
3 former Brooklyn-based Galleries

 Halsey Hathaway @ Rawson Projects
TWO TWO ONE” @ Regina Rex Gallery
 Group Show @ (harbor) gallery

221 Madison St., NYC (map)

Regina Rex presents new projects by Corey Escoto, Dave Hardy, EJ Hauser and David Stein that explore the underlying potential of their new space. Rawson Projects presents a solo exhibition of paintings by Halsey Hathaway. (harbor) gallery will be producing an ongoing program of rogue events and challenging installations, kicking off with a display of over forty artworks by a significant range of artists.

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:“Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future” Nir HodPaul Kasmin Gallery, 515 W27th St., NYCexhibition of painting and sculpture features a large sculptural work, a snowglobe containing a moving scale model of a pumpjack encased in oil and swirling “snow” comprised of gold-colored flakes, a reflection of the immense wealth generated by the oil trade. Characteristic of Hod’s work is a dark glamour that is both alluring and menacing, exemplified in his three new series of paintings. In I Want Always to be Remembered in Your Heart, smoldering flames are superimposed on delicate flowers, alluding to the paradoxical coexistence of beauty and destruction. - thru Oct 25

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future
 Nir Hod

Paul Kasmin Gallery, 515 W27th St., NYC

exhibition of painting and sculpture features a large sculptural work, a snowglobe containing a moving scale model of a pumpjack encased in oil and swirling “snow” comprised of gold-colored flakes, a reflection of the immense wealth generated by the oil trade. Characteristic of Hod’s work is a dark glamour that is both alluring and menacing, exemplified in his three new series of paintings. In I Want Always to be Remembered in Your Heart, smoldering flames are superimposed on delicate flowers, alluding to the paradoxical coexistence of beauty and destruction. - thru Oct 25

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:“PeaRoeFoam” Jason RhoadesDavid Zwirner Gallery, 537 W20th St., NYCthe show will be a reinstatement of the artist’s PeaRoeFoam project, which debuted at the gallery in 2002 (then located on Greene Street in SoHo) in the first of a trilogy of exhibitions that also brought it to Vienna and Liverpool the same year. A seminal work within Rhoades’s career, it has not been exhibited as a comprehensive presentation until now and many of the individual components are shown here for the first time since the original installations. PeaRoeFoam was Rhoades’s self-made recipe for a “brand new product and revolutionary new material” created from whole green peas, fish-bait style salmon eggs, and white virgin-beaded foam. When combined with non-toxic glue, they transform into a versatile, fast-drying, and ultimately hard material that Rhoades intended for both utilitarian as well as artistic use—made accessible in the form of do-it-yourself “kits,” complete with everything needed to make PeaRoeFoam, accompanied by the artist’s detailed, step-by-step instructions. - thru Oct 18

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

PeaRoeFoam
 Jason Rhoades

David Zwirner Gallery, 537 W20th St., NYC

the show will be a reinstatement of the artist’s PeaRoeFoam project, which debuted at the gallery in 2002 (then located on Greene Street in SoHo) in the first of a trilogy of exhibitions that also brought it to Vienna and Liverpool the same year. A seminal work within Rhoades’s career, it has not been exhibited as a comprehensive presentation until now and many of the individual components are shown here for the first time since the original installations. PeaRoeFoam was Rhoades’s self-made recipe for a “brand new product and revolutionary new material” created from whole green peas, fish-bait style salmon eggs, and white virgin-beaded foam. When combined with non-toxic glue, they transform into a versatile, fast-drying, and ultimately hard material that Rhoades intended for both utilitarian as well as artistic use—made accessible in the form of do-it-yourself “kits,” complete with everything needed to make PeaRoeFoam, accompanied by the artist’s detailed, step-by-step instructions. - thru Oct 18

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Dust Paintings
 Jenny Holzer

Cheim & Read Gallery, 547 W25th St., NYC

Language has been Holzer’s primary medium since the late 1970s. Placed on electronic signs or stone benches, Holzer’s text investigates how ideas are transformed from argument or opinion into fact. While her work has a conceptual base, she involves her viewer through what’s intensely physical. The documents painted most recently trace the political fallout and human wreckage in the global war on terror. The content of her new work is traced, transferred, and each letter and its surround are carefully hand-painted and re-painted. Holzer’s process echoes and amplifies traditional Arabic calligraphy–ghubar–which translates, literally, as “dust writing.” - thru Oct 25

Opens Friday, Sept 5, 7-10p:

PIEROGI XX: Twentieth Anniversary Exhibition

Pierogi Gallery,  177 N 9th St., Brooklyn, NYC

an eclectic group of work by over one hundred ninety artists, installed salon style. Pierogi Gallery, which opened in Williamsburg, Brooklyn on North 9th Street September 1994, where it remains today.

“We would like to thank everyone who made Pierogi what it is today by presenting works by many of the artists who have participated in exhibitions over the last twenty years.”

pictured:

James Hyde, “Fence,” 2014, Acrylic on archival inkjet print on wood

Dawn Clements, “Table (Civitella Rainieri),” 2013, Gouache and ink on paper

Opens Sept 10:“A New Surrealism, Works from the 1930’s” Joseph CornellVan Doren Waxter Gallery, 23 East 73rd St., NYCThe exhibition features small-scale collages of the 1930’s, Joseph Cornell’s first forays into the found object assemblages for which he became known. Other exhibition highlights include box compositions, whimsical pocket-sized pill box creations from Cornell’s initial experimentation with objects and containers that lead to the shadow box. These works give an intimate look into the imaginative vision of this uniquely self-taught American surrealist. Cornell’s idiosyncratic method developed as he visited art galleries and second-hand book sellers in Manhattan’s mercantile district, where he acquired a collection of materials and ephemera. His early collections of memorabilia and curiosities were integral to his creative process. The cultivated and curated collections, which Cornell would use to compose his assemblages, drew from his eclectic interests that ranged from literature, music and dance, maps and science, to a fascination with Hollywood and Vaudeville and to the spiritual theories of Christian Science, which the artist first embraced in the 1920’s. Cornell is widely characterized as reclusive, as he seldom ventured far from the Utopia Parkway, Queens, New York home he shared with his mother and disabled brother. - thru Oct 31

Opens Sept 10:

A New Surrealism, Works from the 1930’s
 Joseph Cornell

Van Doren Waxter Gallery, 23 East 73rd St., NYC

The exhibition features small-scale collages of the 1930’s, Joseph Cornell’s first forays into the found object assemblages for which he became known. Other exhibition highlights include box compositions, whimsical pocket-sized pill box creations from Cornell’s initial experimentation with objects and containers that lead to the shadow box. These works give an intimate look into the imaginative vision of this uniquely self-taught American surrealist. Cornell’s idiosyncratic method developed as he visited art galleries and second-hand book sellers in Manhattan’s mercantile district, where he acquired a collection of materials and ephemera. His early collections of memorabilia and curiosities were integral to his creative process. The cultivated and curated collections, which Cornell would use to compose his assemblages, drew from his eclectic interests that ranged from literature, music and dance, maps and science, to a fascination with Hollywood and Vaudeville and to the spiritual theories of Christian Science, which the artist first embraced in the 1920’s. Cornell is widely characterized as reclusive, as he seldom ventured far from the Utopia Parkway, Queens, New York home he shared with his mother and disabled brother. - thru Oct 31

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Thurs, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Drawings
 Do Ho Suh
 
Lehmann Maupin, 40 W26th St., NYC
Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie St., NYC

an exhibition of new works by renowned Korean artist Do Ho Suh. On display at both 540 West 26th Street and 201 Chrystie Street, the exhibition will highlight the significant role and varied forms drawing plays in Suh’s oeuvre. This two-part show will feature the range of his works on paper, including drawings using pencil, pen, ink, and watercolor, his unique “thread” drawings, as well as his large-scale rubbings. Primarily known for his room-scale installations made of transparent fabric that recreate spaces in which he has lived, the artist has consistently utilized drawing throughout his career to explore and develop relationships between common themes of his practice including notions of home, physical space, displacement, identity, and memory. A focus of this exhibition, and Suh’s most elaborate use of drawing to date, is his Rubbing/Loving Project. Here Suh painstakingly covered the flat walls and three-dimensional fixtures of the interior and exterior of architectural spaces that hold great personal, cultural, or historic significance to him with vellum and rubbed each surface with colored pencil or graphite.

closing Sunday:“PLEH” Gobby, Nicholas Buffon, Allegra CrowtherShoot The Lobster, 138 Eldridge St., NYC“in Pleh, three very different artists—Gobby, Nick Buffon, Allegra Crowther—take up the onanistic tedium and thrills of obsession and boredom in dispirited urban desolation, a context familiar to New Yorkers resigned to spend long summer weeks in the city. Curator Alexander Shulan, who directs STL—the austere Chinatown satellite of Chelsea’s Martos Gallery—presents a witty salon-style hanging of industrious and psychedelic comic-book illustrations and alluringly sloppy sculptural tableaux. The exhibition weirdly reminisces a certain generation of 1990s cable television cartoons—Rocco’s Modern Life or the more adult-oriented Duckman that present often-doomed, neurotic characters as disempowered subjects in a mechanistic, indifferent universe.” - ARTFORUM

closing Sunday:

PLEH
 Gobby, Nicholas Buffon, Allegra Crowther

Shoot The Lobster, 138 Eldridge St., NYC

“in Pleh, three very different artists—Gobby, Nick Buffon, Allegra Crowther—take up the onanistic tedium and thrills of obsession and boredom in dispirited urban desolation, a context familiar to New Yorkers resigned to spend long summer weeks in the city. Curator Alexander Shulan, who directs STL—the austere Chinatown satellite of Chelsea’s Martos Gallery—presents a witty salon-style hanging of industrious and psychedelic comic-book illustrations and alluringly sloppy sculptural tableaux. The exhibition weirdly reminisces a certain generation of 1990s cable television cartoons—Rocco’s Modern Life or the more adult-oriented Duckman that present often-doomed, neurotic characters as disempowered subjects in a mechanistic, indifferent universe.” - ARTFORUM

newly opened:

All this happened, more or less
 Elizabeth Glaessner
 
P.P.O.W Gallery, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)

Glaessner combines familiar objects with misunderstood and idiosyncratic portraits, often laden with humor that counterpoint her macabre imagery. An exploration of memory, personal history and ritual, Glaessner’s work questions the way in which we relate to and envision our past. Her most recent paintings depict a highly detailed mythology of post-human existence on earth that features anthropomorphic, gelatinous figures in familiar, yet toxic, landscapes. These organic creatures appear as if born from natural forms, like tree trunks and rock formations, in attempt to reconstruct lost histories through the detritus left behind. - thru Aug 15

recommended: opening tonight in 2 locations, 6-8p:“ANOTHER LOOK at DETROIT: PARTS 1 and 2” curated by Todd Levin  Marianne Boesky Gallery, 509 W24th St., NYCMarlborough Chelsea Gallery, 545 W25th St., NYCA joint project between Marianne Boesky Gallery and Marlborough Chelsea, Another Look at Detroit presents works and objects by over fifty artists, designers, and cultural contributors. The focus of this exhibition is the city of Detroit as a creative center, historically through to today. Spanning a period of 150 years, and taking place at both galleries’ Chelsea spaces, this exhibition is by no means a comprehensive survey. Rather, Another Look at Detroit intends to portray a vision as sprawling and complex as the biography of the city itself.pictured: Diego Rivera, Edsel B. Ford, 1932, Oil on canvas

recommended: opening tonight in 2 locations, 6-8p:

ANOTHER LOOK at DETROIT: PARTS 1 and 2
 curated by Todd Levin
 
Marianne Boesky Gallery, 509 W24th St., NYC
Marlborough Chelsea Gallery, 545 W25th St., NYC

A joint project between Marianne Boesky Gallery and Marlborough Chelsea, Another Look at Detroit presents works and objects by over fifty artists, designers, and cultural contributors. The focus of this exhibition is the city of Detroit as a creative center, historically through to today. Spanning a period of 150 years, and taking place at both galleries’ Chelsea spaces, this exhibition is by no means a comprehensive survey. Rather, Another Look at Detroit intends to portray a vision as sprawling and complex as the biography of the city itself.

pictured: Diego Rivera, Edsel B. Ford, 1932, Oil on canvas