nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

recommended:

The Real Estate Show, Was Then: 1980

James Fuentes Gallery, 55 Delancey St., NYC

a historical exhibition revisiting Colab’s infamous 1980 “The Real Estate Show” with original archived artworks. “During the late 1970s and early 1980s the art world underwent rapid change. More and more artists found inspiration by engaging the real world while simultaneously discovering the power of banding together either to confront or circumvent the established order… on New Years’ Eve 1980 a group of Colab members and friends started the new decade off with a bang by squatting an empty, city-owned building on Delancey Street and mounting ‘The Real Estate Show,’ an exhibition about greed, gentrification, eviction, and dislocation. Although the police quickly shut down the show, the guerrilla exhibition attracted so much media attention that as a compromise the city offered the artists the use of another abandoned building on nearby Rivington Street.” (Alan Moore and Marc Miller, 98Bowery.com)

opens Apr 17, 6-8p:

Day by Day, Good Day
 Peter Dreher

Koenig & Clinton Gallery, 459 W19th St., NYC

a historical exhibition presenting paintings from 1974-2012. Dreher began his series Tag um Tag Guter Tag (Day by Day, Good Day) after painting his first glass in 1972. Dreher continued rendering a single empty water glass repeatedly, by day and by night, and has continued doing so over the course of several decades. The title of the series is linked to a Zen Buddhist maxim that espouses the equanimity of all things and objective perception of the world. Schooled as a figurative painter, the artist has remained steadfast to this commitment over the years, painting the same glass, within the same surroundings, from the same angle every day. To date, the series includes nearly 5,000 individual paintings. - thru May 24

Opens Tonight, 6-8p:

Are Your Motives Pure? Raymond Pettibon Surfers 1987-2012”
 Raymond Pettibon
 
Venus Over Manhattan Gallery, 980 Madison Ave., NYC

first exhibition ever organized to focus exclusively on Raymond Pettibon’s ‘surfer paintings,’ bringing together forty works spanning a quarter century of the artist’s career. Since the 1970s, Los Angeles-based artist Raymond Pettibon has been metabolizing America - its history, literature, sports, religion, politics, and sexuality - in a barrage of drawings and paintings in a style born of comic books and the “do-it-yourself” aesthetic of Southern California punk rock album-covers, concert flyers, and fanzines. Limning a dizzying array of topics with his distinctive combinations of image and text, Pettibon has created a vocabulary of symbols that reappear consistently if enigmatically across his oeuvre. - thru May 17

Opens Tonight, 6-8p:“The Super Can Man and Other Illustrated Classics” Kristen Morgin Zach Feuer Gallery, 548 W22nd St., NYCThe exhibition is populated with sculptures, composed primarily of unfired clay and paint, of super heroes and heroines found in comic books, fairy tales and popular culture.  Some work is re-created as a single object, such as a Little Golden Book edition of Hansel and Gretel.  Other work, like The Ugly Duckling, is seemingly reimaged from repurposed materials one may have on hand -  the stub of a pencil, a Skippy peanut butter jar top and two painted pieces of wood.

Opens Tonight, 6-8p:

The Super Can Man and Other Illustrated Classics
 Kristen Morgin
 
Zach Feuer Gallery, 548 W22nd St., NYC

The exhibition is populated with sculptures, composed primarily of unfired clay and paint, of super heroes and heroines found in comic books, fairy tales and popular culture.  Some work is re-created as a single object, such as a Little Golden Book edition of Hansel and Gretel.  Other work, like The Ugly Duckling, is seemingly reimaged from repurposed materials one may have on hand -  the stub of a pencil, a Skippy peanut butter jar top and two painted pieces of wood.

recently opened:“Overculture” William Powhida Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYCYou know William Powhida and his colorful painted lists of rants, instructions, jokes and truths. Here they are supersized and in oil paint. “My studio practice is based in drawing, which I like to think of more as a thought process than a way of working.  My work tends to draw out a concept, often a critique, through some formal means. Primarily, I’m known for drawings of trompe l’oeil lists and letters authored in the voice of “Powhida,” a sensationalist, self-loathing and unreliable narrator… While it doesn’t take much to get me drawing, following a critical inquiry to unusual and uncomfortable ends is where the energy is, like having a long conversation about coyotes with a taxidermist.” - William Powhida to The L Magazine’s Paul D’Agostinophoto by Jason Andrew

recently opened:

Overculture
 William Powhida
 
Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYC

You know William Powhida and his colorful painted lists of rants, instructions, jokes and truths. Here they are supersized and in oil paint.

“My studio practice is based in drawing, which I like to think of more as a thought process than a way of working.  My work tends to draw out a concept, often a critique, through some formal means. Primarily, I’m known for drawings of trompe l’oeil lists and letters authored in the voice of “Powhida,” a sensationalist, self-loathing and unreliable narrator… While it doesn’t take much to get me drawing, following a critical inquiry to unusual and uncomfortable ends is where the energy is, like having a long conversation about coyotes with a taxidermist.” - William Powhida to The L Magazine’s Paul D’Agostino

photo by Jason Andrew

continues thru Mar 30:“Still.Life” Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,  Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop YoonOUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYCThe most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

continues thru Mar 30:

Still.Life
 Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,
 Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop Yoon

OUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYC


The most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

opens tomorrow, Thurs, 6-8p:“Big Girl Now” Klara Kristalova Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 201 Chrystie St., NYCWith each sculpture, Kristalova builds an imaginative narrative around common emotions and everyday situations, turning to a diversity of influences that include music, memory and current events,  literature, myths and fairytales.  Her slightly unsettling hand-painted figures—often hybrids of human, animal, insect or plant forms—communicate a tension but also a balance between states of being or transformation. The idea of transformation, particularly the age of adolescence as a time of both physical and psychological change, has been a recurring theme in Kristalova’s work. In Big Girl Now, Kristalova presents a group of portraits of women rooted in a more established period of the life cycle, suggesting that the transformation of youth does not cease once one is “grown up”.
pictured: Sneak peek of Kristalova’s during installation. This image features “Keyhole Woman,” (2013), “Young Girl Growing,” (2013) and “Twins,” (2014). Image by Lehmann Maupin.

opens tomorrow, Thurs, 6-8p:

Big Girl Now
 Klara Kristalova
 
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 201 Chrystie St., NYC

With each sculpture, Kristalova builds an imaginative narrative around common emotions and everyday situations, turning to a diversity of influences that include music, memory and current events,  literature, myths and fairytales.  Her slightly unsettling hand-painted figures—often hybrids of human, animal, insect or plant forms—communicate a tension but also a balance between states of being or transformation. The idea of transformation, particularly the age of adolescence as a time of both physical and psychological change, has been a recurring theme in Kristalova’s work. In Big Girl Now, Kristalova presents a group of portraits of women rooted in a more established period of the life cycle, suggesting that the transformation of youth does not cease once one is “grown up”.

pictured: Sneak peek of Kristalova’s during installation. This image features “Keyhole Woman,” (2013), “Young Girl Growing,” (2013) and “Twins,” (2014). Image by Lehmann Maupin.

just opened:“Overcoming the Modern  Dansaekhwa: The Korean Monochrome Movement” curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath Alexander Gray Gallery, 508 W26th St., NYCIn the late 1950s, a disparate number of young Korean artists discarded realism and figuration and adopted a monochromatic palette and artistic techniques that highlighted the flatness of the canvas as a foundation for later accretions and the physicality of the used materials. By the mid-1970s they had become known as Danseakhwa: The Korean Monochrome Movement. The exhibition features paintings and works on paper by some of the leading figures of Danseakhwa: Chung Sang-hwa, Ha Chong-hyun, Hur Hwang, Lee Dong-Youb, Lee Ufan, Park Seo-bo, and Yun Hyong-keun. Through a selection spanning three decades of artistic production, the exhibition highlights the artists’ efforts to make art that defies national identity and cultural production. The movement highlights the struggle between notions of belonging, national identity, and artistic innovation resulting from a negotiation with local cultural specificity and a Western notion of modernity. - thru Mar 29pictured: Lee Ufan, From Line No. 12–12, 1982Oil and mineral pigment on canvas

just opened:

Overcoming the Modern
 Dansaekhwa: The Korean Monochrome Movement
 curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath
 
Alexander Gray Gallery, 508 W26th St., NYC

In the late 1950s, a disparate number of young Korean artists discarded realism and figuration and adopted a monochromatic palette and artistic techniques that highlighted the flatness of the canvas as a foundation for later accretions and the physicality of the used materials. By the mid-1970s they had become known as Danseakhwa: The Korean Monochrome Movement. The exhibition features paintings and works on paper by some of the leading figures of Danseakhwa: Chung Sang-hwa, Ha Chong-hyun, Hur Hwang, Lee Dong-Youb, Lee Ufan, Park Seo-bo, and Yun Hyong-keun. Through a selection spanning three decades of artistic production, the exhibition highlights the artists’ efforts to make art that defies national identity and cultural production. The movement highlights the struggle between notions of belonging, national identity, and artistic innovation resulting from a negotiation with local cultural specificity and a Western notion of modernity. - thru Mar 29

pictured:
Lee Ufan, From Line No. 12–12, 1982
Oil and mineral pigment on canvas

just opened:“Fabricated Revisions” Megan Whitmarsh MULHERIN + POLLARD Gallery, 187 Chrystie St., NYCWorking predominantly with textiles, Megan Whitmarsh uses hand-stitched embroidery to fabricate replicas of personal and cultural ephemera. Although she also creates comic books, paintings, drawings, and stop animation, Whitmarsh is best known for her hand-embroidered canvases and soft sculptures, which make reference to both contemporary pop culture and the 1970s and ’80s eras of her childhood. “The artists I find compelling are mostly women and I decided to pay tribute to this personal fact. Many of these works are from a fictionalized past. From 1970-1980, Artforum devoted 5 of it’s 99 covers to women artists.” – Megan Whitmarsh, 2013

just opened:

Fabricated Revisions
 Megan Whitmarsh
 
MULHERIN + POLLARD Gallery, 187 Chrystie St., NYC

Working predominantly with textiles, Megan Whitmarsh uses hand-stitched embroidery to fabricate replicas of personal and cultural ephemera. Although she also creates comic books, paintings, drawings, and stop animation, Whitmarsh is best known for her hand-embroidered canvases and soft sculptures, which make reference to both contemporary pop culture and the 1970s and ’80s eras of her childhood. “The artists I find compelling are mostly women and I decided to pay tribute to this personal fact. Many of these works are from a fictionalized past. From 1970-1980, Artforum devoted 5 of it’s 99 covers to women artists.” – Megan Whitmarsh, 2013

opens tonight, Feb 19, 6-8p:“«suddenly I felt the river in me»” Carolina Raquel AntichLynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYCfeaturing porcelain artworks and a series of canvases, the exhibition is a purview of Antich’s longtime fascination with childhood. Antich recently embraced a sculptural extension of her paintings, magnifying the delicateness and fragility of her subjects and the situations they are involved in. While the artist’s paintings often evoke an allegorical worldview, depicting children in a territory where there is no fear, a free zone full of nuances and beauty, the sculptural work brings to the fore spaces of protection and refuge, while underscoring the autistic condition of her subjects in their extreme mode of concentration.

opens tonight, Feb 19, 6-8p:

«suddenly I felt the river in me»
 Carolina Raquel Antich

Lynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYC


featuring porcelain artworks and a series of canvases, the exhibition is a purview of Antich’s longtime fascination with childhood. Antich recently embraced a sculptural extension of her paintings, magnifying the delicateness and fragility of her subjects and the situations they are involved in. While the artist’s paintings often evoke an allegorical worldview, depicting children in a territory where there is no fear, a free zone full of nuances and beauty, the sculptural work brings to the fore spaces of protection and refuge, while underscoring the autistic condition of her subjects in their extreme mode of concentration.