nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru Aug 3:“Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010”The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCSigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

thru Aug 3:

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

Sigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

thru July 29:“Me, My Mother, My Father, and I” Ragnar Kjartansson New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYCthe first New York museum exhibition of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson presents works with and about his family, including a newly orchestrated performance and video piece entitled Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage (2011/2014), in which ten musicians play a live composition for the duration of the exhibition. This work takes inspiration from a scene in Iceland’s first feature film, Morðsaga (1977), directed by Reynir Oddsson, in which the main character of the film, played by Kjartansson’s mother, Guðrún Ásmundsdóttir, fantasizes about a plumber, played by Kjartansson’s father, Kjartan Ragnarsson, in a sex scene on the kitchen floor. As family legend has it, Kjartansson was conceived the night after the film shoot. Kjartan Sveinsson, composer and a former member of the Icelandic band Sigur Rós, transformed the scene’s dialogue into a ten-part polyphony played by ten musicians, who sing and play guitar in the tradition of the troubadour to accompany a projection of the original film scene. (photo: Benoit Pailley)

thru July 29:

Me, My Mother, My Father, and I
 Ragnar Kjartansson
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

the first New York museum exhibition of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson presents works with and about his family, including a newly orchestrated performance and video piece entitled Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage (2011/2014), in which ten musicians play a live composition for the duration of the exhibition. This work takes inspiration from a scene in Iceland’s first feature film, Morðsaga (1977), directed by Reynir Oddsson, in which the main character of the film, played by Kjartansson’s mother, Guðrún Ásmundsdóttir, fantasizes about a plumber, played by Kjartansson’s father, Kjartan Ragnarsson, in a sex scene on the kitchen floor. As family legend has it, Kjartansson was conceived the night after the film shoot. Kjartan Sveinsson, composer and a former member of the Icelandic band Sigur Rós, transformed the scene’s dialogue into a ten-part polyphony played by ten musicians, who sing and play guitar in the tradition of the troubadour to accompany a projection of the original film scene. (photo: Benoit Pailley)

just opened:“Eager” Allison Schulnik ZieherSmith Gallery, 516 W20th St., NYCthe exhibit features the premiere of her fourth animated film since 2000, Eager, along with related paintings, sculpture, and works on paper. Drawing from sources both autobiographical and inspirational, Eager is a poignant journey set between a timeless void and supernatural abundance; it is a celebration of the moving painting. An experiment in animation as dance (the artist was trained as a dancer), its subjects are choreographed in abstract, emotive gestures. The line is blurred between the material elements of painting (texture, color, form) and the physicality and movement of ballet and theater. Like all her films, it is also a celebration of the hand-made and a purist clay-mation where all effects are done in-camera. Schulnik animated thousands of frames entirely herself, and alone constructed over 65 figural puppets made of clay, fabrics, wire, wood, paint and glue. - thru Feb 22

just opened:

Eager
 Allison Schulnik
 
ZieherSmith Gallery, 516 W20th St., NYC

the exhibit features the premiere of her fourth animated film since 2000, Eager, along with related paintings, sculpture, and works on paper. Drawing from sources both autobiographical and inspirational, Eager is a poignant journey set between a timeless void and supernatural abundance; it is a celebration of the moving painting. An experiment in animation as dance (the artist was trained as a dancer), its subjects are choreographed in abstract, emotive gestures. The line is blurred between the material elements of painting (texture, color, form) and the physicality and movement of ballet and theater. Like all her films, it is also a celebration of the hand-made and a purist clay-mation where all effects are done in-camera. Schulnik animated thousands of frames entirely herself, and alone constructed over 65 figural puppets made of clay, fabrics, wire, wood, paint and glue. - thru Feb 22

Opens Oct 30, 6-8p:“The Swimming Lessons (1981), Translating Duchamp’s Green Box” Robert C. MorganRooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYCfirst New York showing of this complete work, which has remained in storage since its first venue at the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita, Kansas (1981). Morgan became involved in studying the work of Duchamp and was taken by the following passage excerpted from an interview with Pierre Cabanne: “…I didn’t just float along! I had eight years of swimming lessons.” Morgan decided to use a phrase from this quote for his conceptually based work. The project involved working in many mediums, ranging from drawing to artists’ books, from painting to performance (many of which occurred in swimming pools), from super-8 film to video. One of his most important works was a series of ten drawings completed in 1981, involving photographs taken systemically from a videotape of two young women translating Duchamp’s Green Box notes. Although the original tape of this translation apparently disappeared, the still photographs, taken by the artist, were used to create a conceptual work, titled The Swimming Lessons. - thru Dec 1

Opens Oct 30, 6-8p:

The Swimming Lessons (1981), Translating Duchamp’s Green Box
 Robert C. Morgan

Rooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYC

first New York showing of this complete work, which has remained in storage since its first venue at the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita, Kansas (1981). Morgan became involved in studying the work of Duchamp and was taken by the following passage excerpted from an interview with Pierre Cabanne: “…I didn’t just float along! I had eight years of swimming lessons.” Morgan decided to use a phrase from this quote for his conceptually based work. The project involved working in many mediums, ranging from drawing to artists’ books, from painting to performance (many of which occurred in swimming pools), from super-8 film to video. One of his most important works was a series of ten drawings completed in 1981, involving photographs taken systemically from a videotape of two young women translating Duchamp’s Green Box notes. Although the original tape of this translation apparently disappeared, the still photographs, taken by the artist, were used to create a conceptual work, titled The Swimming Lessons. - thru Dec 1

recently opened:

We Are the Primitives of a New Era
 Aldo Tambellini

James Cohan Gallery, 533 W26th St., NYC


Tambellini’s first New York gallery exhibition in nearly four decades. Paintings and Projections from 1961-1989 featuring a multimedia piece incorporating his seminal cameraless films, “Lumagrams” (projected hand-painted glass slide), selections from the Black Film Series and sound in an immersive environment that is meant to “dislocate the senses of the viewer.” Additionally on view will be Tambellini’s paintings and unique photographs, or “Videograms,” most of which have not been seen since the 1960s and have only recently been rediscovered.  - thru Oct 19

thru Sept 8:“Stranger Debris Roll Roll Roll” Erika VogtNew Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (Lobby Gallery)Vogt uses a range of media and techniques in order to explore the mutability of images and objects. Within her installations, she fuses elements of sculpture, drawing, video, and photography to produce multilayered image spaces. She challenges prescribed art-making systems, conflating and confusing their logic, as sculptures take on the properties of drawing and photographs take on the nature of film. Building on her background in experimental filmmaking, Vogt’s visually dense videos combine both still and moving images, digital and analog technologies, and playfully incorporate drawings and objects from her previous projects.

thru Sept 8:

Stranger Debris Roll Roll Roll”
 Erika Vogt

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (Lobby Gallery)

Vogt uses a range of media and techniques in order to explore the mutability of images and objects. Within her installations, she fuses elements of sculpture, drawing, video, and photography to produce multilayered image spaces. She challenges prescribed art-making systems, conflating and confusing their logic, as sculptures take on the properties of drawing and photographs take on the nature of film. Building on her background in experimental filmmaking, Vogt’s visually dense videos combine both still and moving images, digital and analog technologies, and playfully incorporate drawings and objects from her previous projects.

just opened:“Ão, 1981” TungaLuhring Augustine, 25 Knickerbocker Ave., Brooklyn, NYTunga’s seminal 1981 film installation, Ão, in the gallery’s Bushwick location. The work is comprised of a 16mm filmstrip that moves through a projector and around the exhibition space on a series of roller bearings. The projected image shows the interior of a curved segment of the Dois Irmãos Tunnel in Rio de Janeiro; it is looped to appear as though the camera moves along a continuous, ring-shaped path, as if traveling through a particle accelerator. The unending loop, or torus, is an important recurring motif throughout Tunga’s body of work and is duplicated in the structural form of the installation: the rollers that allow the filmstrip to traverse the space are arranged in a large circular configuration. The audio component of the piece, a looped excerpt from Night and Day sung by Frank Sinatra, emphasizes the installation’s endless nature, creating a sense of space and time as cyclical. - thru Aug 29Tunga was born in Palmares in 1952 and is one of the leading Brazilian artists of his generation. His principal mediums – sculpture, installation, and performance – are customarily presented as a single integrated body of work that underscores a complex relationship between the individual pieces.

just opened:

Ão, 1981
 Tunga

Luhring Augustine, 25 Knickerbocker Ave., Brooklyn, NY

Tunga’s seminal 1981 film installation, Ão, in the gallery’s Bushwick location. The work is comprised of a 16mm filmstrip that moves through a projector and around the exhibition space on a series of roller bearings. The projected image shows the interior of a curved segment of the Dois Irmãos Tunnel in Rio de Janeiro; it is looped to appear as though the camera moves along a continuous, ring-shaped path, as if traveling through a particle accelerator. The unending loop, or torus, is an important recurring motif throughout Tunga’s body of work and is duplicated in the structural form of the installation: the rollers that allow the filmstrip to traverse the space are arranged in a large circular configuration. The audio component of the piece, a looped excerpt from Night and Day sung by Frank Sinatra, emphasizes the installation’s endless nature, creating a sense of space and time as cyclical. - thru Aug 29

Tunga was born in Palmares in 1952 and is one of the leading Brazilian artists of his generation. His principal mediums – sculpture, installation, and performance – are customarily presented as a single integrated body of work that underscores a complex relationship between the individual pieces.

thru Sept 22:

The Bruce High Quality Foundation: Ode to Joy, 2001–2013
 organized by Eugenie Tsai, John & Barbara Vogelstein

Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY

a retrospective of over fifty works by The Bruce High Quality Foundation, a Brooklyn-based artist group whose production includes subversive and often humorous installation art, live performance, film, and social sculpture. Through its writings, original works of art, and free, unaccredited art school (The Bruce High Quality Foundation University), it attempts to democratize relationships between artist and public. The Foundation’s work often combines past, present, and future, blending fact and fiction in an attempt to encourage and reframe cultural discourse and, in its own words, to “invest the experience of public space with wonder, to resurrect art history from the bowels of despair, and to impregnate the institutions of art with the joy of man’s desiring.

Opens Thurs, May 2, 6-8p: “I Followed You To The Sun” Tracey EminBoth Locations:Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYCLehmann Maupin Gallery, 201 Chrystie St., NYCa two-part exhibition featuring over 100 works of art, including a series of new bronze sculptures, paintings and drawings, embroideries, and a short film.  - thru July 12

Opens Thurs, May 2, 6-8p:

I Followed You To The Sun
 Tracey Emin

Both Locations:
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYC
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 201 Chrystie St., NYC

a two-part exhibition featuring over 100 works of art, including a series of new bronze sculptures, paintings and drawings, embroideries, and a short film.  - thru July 12

Performance Tonight, 8-10p: embryoroom and Slow Knightsenvoy enterprises, 87 Rivington St., NYC (bt Orchard & Ludlow)Transforming envoy’s basement into a black-box mise-en-scene activated with the haunting scenographic stylings of Gruen and the metronomic flash of Quist’s video projections and soundscapes, this exhibition is the first live presentation of Quist’s feature film The Untitled and an exploration of the collaborative work between the two artists.

Performance Tonight, 8-10p:

embryoroom and Slow Knights

envoy enterprises, 87 Rivington St., NYC (bt Orchard & Ludlow)

Transforming envoy’s basement into a black-box mise-en-scene activated with the haunting scenographic stylings of Gruen and the metronomic flash of Quist’s video projections and soundscapes, this exhibition is the first live presentation of Quist’s feature film The Untitled and an exploration of the collaborative work between the two artists.