nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens Tonight, Dec 12, 6-8p:“Domenico Zindato: Recent Drawings”Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th st)Zindato’s work has evolved since he presented his first solo exhibition in New York, at the Phyllis Kind Gallery, in 2000. At that time, his drawings were smaller. Large patches of color and his signature, symbol-like motifs figured in those earlier pictures, but they were less densely compacted than they appear today. As his drawing surfaces grew bigger, the images he created on them did not automatically grow larger in scale, too; that is, he enlarged his compositions’ background swaths of solid colors but he continued to render the lines and sizes of his repeated, random-pattern motifs—hands, eyes, snakes, heads, birds and more—as tiny and as meticulously as ever. As a result, seen from a distance, Zindato’s works of recent years read visually as rhythmic plays of abstract, colored forms. Up close, they pull viewers into thickets of finely elaborated patterns, made up of the artist’s tiny motifs, which are set against those dynamic fields of color.  - thru Jan 18

Opens Tonight, Dec 12, 6-8p:

Domenico Zindato: Recent Drawings”

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th st)

Zindato’s work has evolved since he presented his first solo exhibition in New York, at the Phyllis Kind Gallery, in 2000. At that time, his drawings were smaller. Large patches of color and his signature, symbol-like motifs figured in those earlier pictures, but they were less densely compacted than they appear today. As his drawing surfaces grew bigger, the images he created on them did not automatically grow larger in scale, too; that is, he enlarged his compositions’ background swaths of solid colors but he continued to render the lines and sizes of his repeated, random-pattern motifs—hands, eyes, snakes, heads, birds and more—as tiny and as meticulously as ever. As a result, seen from a distance, Zindato’s works of recent years read visually as rhythmic plays of abstract, colored forms. Up close, they pull viewers into thickets of finely elaborated patterns, made up of the artist’s tiny motifs, which are set against those dynamic fields of color.  - thru Jan 18

Opens Fri, Nov 15, 6-8p:

Mequitta Ahuja

Thierry Goldberg Gallery, 103 Norfolk St., NYC

“Ahuja references a variety of cultural traditions, including the arts of Africa, Asia, and America… she suggests that identity is not only fluid, but that it represents a layering of different guises—both real and fictional, historic and contemporary. Her work also demonstrates an interest in different types of marks and materials. She employs hand stamps, paints with brushes, and draws directly onto the collaged ground.”  - National Portrait Gallery

“My self-portraits are “auto-mythic.” I define automythography as a process of identity formation that combines the real with the self-invented. I position myself within a history of Eastern and Western representation, reflecting my identity as an African American and South Asian American woman. My sources include Buddhist wall paintings and Mughal manuscript art.” - Mequitta Ahuja

Opens Tonight, Oct 19, 6-8p:“the room had an imposing dominance over the man” Adam HayesCindy Rucker Gallery, 141 Attorney St., NYCHayes’ drawings carefully elucidate scenes stroke by stroke. Constructed in a manner that always reminds us that we are looking at parts, even as the subject itself sparks to life. Rodinesque figures loom over the fading remains of what were once possibly great halls occupied by a ruling few. Echoing his work with line and form on paper, Hayes’ written series presents a selection of abstractly recognizable directions. Each builds a visceral scene of light and shadow populated by an undifferentiated cast- thru Nov 24

Opens Tonight, Oct 19, 6-8p:

the room had an imposing dominance over the man
 Adam Hayes

Cindy Rucker Gallery, 141 Attorney St., NYC

Hayes’ drawings carefully elucidate scenes stroke by stroke. Constructed in a manner that always reminds us that we are looking at parts, even as the subject itself sparks to life. Rodinesque figures loom over the fading remains of what were once possibly great halls occupied by a ruling few. Echoing his work with line and form on paper, Hayes’ written series presents a selection of abstractly recognizable directions. Each builds a visceral scene of light and shadow populated by an undifferentiated cast- thru Nov 24

Opens Oct 30, 6-8p:“The Swimming Lessons (1981), Translating Duchamp’s Green Box” Robert C. MorganRooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYCfirst New York showing of this complete work, which has remained in storage since its first venue at the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita, Kansas (1981). Morgan became involved in studying the work of Duchamp and was taken by the following passage excerpted from an interview with Pierre Cabanne: “…I didn’t just float along! I had eight years of swimming lessons.” Morgan decided to use a phrase from this quote for his conceptually based work. The project involved working in many mediums, ranging from drawing to artists’ books, from painting to performance (many of which occurred in swimming pools), from super-8 film to video. One of his most important works was a series of ten drawings completed in 1981, involving photographs taken systemically from a videotape of two young women translating Duchamp’s Green Box notes. Although the original tape of this translation apparently disappeared, the still photographs, taken by the artist, were used to create a conceptual work, titled The Swimming Lessons. - thru Dec 1

Opens Oct 30, 6-8p:

The Swimming Lessons (1981), Translating Duchamp’s Green Box
 Robert C. Morgan

Rooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYC

first New York showing of this complete work, which has remained in storage since its first venue at the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita, Kansas (1981). Morgan became involved in studying the work of Duchamp and was taken by the following passage excerpted from an interview with Pierre Cabanne: “…I didn’t just float along! I had eight years of swimming lessons.” Morgan decided to use a phrase from this quote for his conceptually based work. The project involved working in many mediums, ranging from drawing to artists’ books, from painting to performance (many of which occurred in swimming pools), from super-8 film to video. One of his most important works was a series of ten drawings completed in 1981, involving photographs taken systemically from a videotape of two young women translating Duchamp’s Green Box notes. Although the original tape of this translation apparently disappeared, the still photographs, taken by the artist, were used to create a conceptual work, titled The Swimming Lessons. - thru Dec 1

recently opened:“Change and Horizontals” Sean ScullyThe Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC$5 (admission is free on Thursdays, 6–8pm)This intensely focused survey comprises Sean Scully’s acrylic, ink, graphite, and masking-tape drawings from 1974–75—presented together for the first time in over 30 years—as well as two large-scale paintings from the same period and one of the artist’s personal notebooks. Scully’s maturation as a painter can easily be traced back to innovations in his early drawings. These drawings are marked by refined geometries that re-imagine the history of abstraction as an art rooted in experience—“something felt and something seen,” as the artist has said. Executed in London and New York City respectively, the Change and Horizontals drawings, along with their preparatory sketches and never-before-seen experimental typewriter drawings from the same period, highlight Scully’s core concern with line and color’s relation to place. Viewed together, the works chart an evolution of composition and gesture that provides unique insight into this artist’s singular aesthetic. This New York exhibition is the last stop on a tour that included the UK, Germany, and Italy. - thru Nov 3

recently opened:

Change and Horizontals
 Sean Scully

The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC
$5 (admission is free on Thursdays, 6–8pm)

This intensely focused survey comprises Sean Scully’s acrylic, ink, graphite, and masking-tape drawings from 1974–75—presented together for the first time in over 30 years—as well as two large-scale paintings from the same period and one of the artist’s personal notebooks. Scully’s maturation as a painter can easily be traced back to innovations in his early drawings. These drawings are marked by refined geometries that re-imagine the history of abstraction as an art rooted in experience—“something felt and something seen,” as the artist has said. Executed in London and New York City respectively, the Change and Horizontals drawings, along with their preparatory sketches and never-before-seen experimental typewriter drawings from the same period, highlight Scully’s core concern with line and color’s relation to place. Viewed together, the works chart an evolution of composition and gesture that provides unique insight into this artist’s singular aesthetic. This New York exhibition is the last stop on a tour that included the UK, Germany, and Italy. - thru Nov 3

recently opened:“Secret Candy” Akikazu IwamotoStux Gallery, 530 W25th St., NYCJapanese artist Akikazu Iwamoto creates wildly imaginative, candy-colored paintings and drawings that offer confronting, amusing, and sometimes frightening revelations of our inflated inner desires in their most distilled state. - thru Oct 12

recently opened:

Secret Candy
 Akikazu Iwamoto

Stux Gallery, 530 W25th St., NYC


Japanese artist Akikazu Iwamoto creates wildly imaginative, candy-colored paintings and drawings that offer confronting, amusing, and sometimes frightening revelations of our inflated inner desires in their most distilled state. - thru Oct 12

opens Tomorrow Thurs, Sept 12, 6-8p:“How to Disappear Completely” Brian Adam DouglasAndrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)solo exhibition of collages and drawings. Brian Adam Douglas is known for his work on the streets of New York City under the moniker Élböw Töe. Virtually all of the works in Douglas’ new series deal with the rebuilding of life and purpose in the wake of catastrophic deconstruction brought on by natural disasters and climate change. They are not merely about the breaking down of things but about an innate capacity to cope with disaster and the rehabilitation of purpose. Spending up to half a year on a single piece, Douglas’ laborious process demands a pictorial integrity where nothing is wasted and everything serves his intensity of purpose. Forgoing the relative ease and fluidity of the brush stroke, the artist methodically builds his compositions through shards of color incised from sheets of paper he has painted, forging a novel way to combine painting and collage into a singular hybrid. - thru Oct 26

opens Tomorrow Thurs, Sept 12, 6-8p:

How to Disappear Completely
 Brian Adam Douglas

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)

solo exhibition of collages and drawings. Brian Adam Douglas is known for his work on the streets of New York City under the moniker Élböw Töe. Virtually all of the works in Douglas’ new series deal with the rebuilding of life and purpose in the wake of catastrophic deconstruction brought on by natural disasters and climate change. They are not merely about the breaking down of things but about an innate capacity to cope with disaster and the rehabilitation of purpose. Spending up to half a year on a single piece, Douglas’ laborious process demands a pictorial integrity where nothing is wasted and everything serves his intensity of purpose. Forgoing the relative ease and fluidity of the brush stroke, the artist methodically builds his compositions through shards of color incised from sheets of paper he has painted, forging a novel way to combine painting and collage into a singular hybrid. - thru Oct 26

opens Sun, Sept 8, 6-8p:

Risk Aversion
 Zoi Gaitanidou

Scaramouche Gallery, 52 Orchard St., NYC

first New York solo exhibition of Greek artist Zoi Gaitanidou, featuring threaded works on cotton and ink drawings. The ominous environment in Gaitanidou’s work is the natural habitat of the universal tribe. Thick vegetation covers every inch of earth. Towering trees elevate the sky to unreachable heights. Aggressive leaves and branches of unknown species of vegetation hinder all motion. Perils lurk slyly from every direction.  - thru Oct 27

thru Sept 8:“Stranger Debris Roll Roll Roll” Erika VogtNew Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (Lobby Gallery)Vogt uses a range of media and techniques in order to explore the mutability of images and objects. Within her installations, she fuses elements of sculpture, drawing, video, and photography to produce multilayered image spaces. She challenges prescribed art-making systems, conflating and confusing their logic, as sculptures take on the properties of drawing and photographs take on the nature of film. Building on her background in experimental filmmaking, Vogt’s visually dense videos combine both still and moving images, digital and analog technologies, and playfully incorporate drawings and objects from her previous projects.

thru Sept 8:

Stranger Debris Roll Roll Roll”
 Erika Vogt

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC (Lobby Gallery)

Vogt uses a range of media and techniques in order to explore the mutability of images and objects. Within her installations, she fuses elements of sculpture, drawing, video, and photography to produce multilayered image spaces. She challenges prescribed art-making systems, conflating and confusing their logic, as sculptures take on the properties of drawing and photographs take on the nature of film. Building on her background in experimental filmmaking, Vogt’s visually dense videos combine both still and moving images, digital and analog technologies, and playfully incorporate drawings and objects from her previous projects.

upcoming, Sept 25, 2013:“Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations” BalthusThe Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., NYC (at 82nd St)explores the origins and permutations of the French artist’s focus on felines and the dark side of childhood. Balthus’s lifelong fascination with adolescence resulted in his most iconic works: girls on the threshold of puberty, hovering between innocence and knowledge. In these pictures, Balthus mingles intuition into his young sitters’ psyches with an erotic undercurrent and forbidding austerity, making them some of the most powerful depictions of childhood and adolescence committed to canvas. Often included in these scenes are enigmatic cats, possible stand-ins for the artist himself. The exhibition focuses on the early decades of the artist’s career, from the mid-1930s to the 1950s, and features approximately 35 paintings, as well as 40 ink drawings for the book Mitsou that were created in 1919, when Balthus was 11 years old—thought to be lost, these drawings have never before been on public display.

upcoming, Sept 25, 2013:

Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations
 Balthus

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., NYC (at 82nd St)

explores the origins and permutations of the French artist’s focus on felines and the dark side of childhood. Balthus’s lifelong fascination with adolescence resulted in his most iconic works: girls on the threshold of puberty, hovering between innocence and knowledge. In these pictures, Balthus mingles intuition into his young sitters’ psyches with an erotic undercurrent and forbidding austerity, making them some of the most powerful depictions of childhood and adolescence committed to canvas. Often included in these scenes are enigmatic cats, possible stand-ins for the artist himself. The exhibition focuses on the early decades of the artist’s career, from the mid-1930s to the 1950s, and features approximately 35 paintings, as well as 40 ink drawings for the book Mitsou that were created in 1919, when Balthus was 11 years old—thought to be lost, these drawings have never before been on public display.