nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens April 11:

Submerged Motherlands
 Swoon
 
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYC

Brooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago.

photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq

Fri, Feb 21, 3p:“Theodore’s Drawing Salon” by Ted Barrow, curated by Alise Tifentale Engineer’s Office Gallery, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, NYC (bt 48th and 49th St)These Drawing Salons began with a fascination of 19th century parlor culture combined with an innocuous and particular pleasure taken from drawing with friends. The project will involve a group of artists meeting at the Engineer’s Office Gallery, touring the galleries of Christie’s and drawing a selected group of objects or images on auction, then installing their renditions of these images in the space provided. The drawings, once installed, can be photographed and documented however each artist wants, but left in the space with the understanding that they will likely be taken down and destroyed by a third party. Although the format and size of the paper will not be regulated, ink drawings are a must. Theodore’s Drawing Salon is an attempt to reflect on the seemingly victorious digitalization of the present-day culture. As a comment to the era of easily accessible tools of digital image-making and platforms for image-sharing, the Salon proposes an explicitly analog image-making and image-sharing environment. Yet the Salon will have its online presence and the team will happily engage in discussion and dissemination of the drawings.pictured: William-Adolphe Bouguereau, The Oreads, 1902

Fri, Feb 21, 3p:

Theodore’s Drawing Salon
 by Ted Barrow, curated by Alise Tifentale
 
Engineer’s Office Gallery, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, NYC (bt 48th and 49th St)

These Drawing Salons began with a fascination of 19th century parlor culture combined with an innocuous and particular pleasure taken from drawing with friends. The project will involve a group of artists meeting at the Engineer’s Office Gallery, touring the galleries of Christie’s and drawing a selected group of objects or images on auction, then installing their renditions of these images in the space provided. The drawings, once installed, can be photographed and documented however each artist wants, but left in the space with the understanding that they will likely be taken down and destroyed by a third party. Although the format and size of the paper will not be regulated, ink drawings are a must. Theodore’s Drawing Salon is an attempt to reflect on the seemingly victorious digitalization of the present-day culture. As a comment to the era of easily accessible tools of digital image-making and platforms for image-sharing, the Salon proposes an explicitly analog image-making and image-sharing environment. Yet the Salon will have its online presence and the team will happily engage in discussion and dissemination of the drawings.

pictured: William-Adolphe Bouguereau, The Oreads, 1902

closing Feb 15:

Requiem
 Sally Tittmann
 
William Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYC (corner of Grand St)

The exhibition is centered around a trio of monumental sculptures made of discarded commercial 4 x 4 wooden beams, along with a group of intimate wall sculptures and a series of beautifully rendered large drawings in pencil.

thru Feb 15:“The Energy Reader” Michael Alan Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert Gallery, 33 Orchard St., NYCseries of new paintings and drawings, “a combination of harmonious opposites, close observation, catharsis, a means of communication and a radical juxtaposition of dimensional elements. He challenges everything: concepts of figure, composition, media and movement, including his own. Exploring the ambiguity of time and history, Alan’s work focuses on crossbreeding and the relationship of destruction and creation.”

thru Feb 15:

The Energy Reader
 Michael Alan
 
Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert Gallery, 33 Orchard St., NYC

series of new paintings and drawings, “a combination of harmonious opposites, close observation, catharsis, a means of communication and a radical juxtaposition of dimensional elements. He challenges everything: concepts of figure, composition, media and movement, including his own. Exploring the ambiguity of time and history, Alan’s work focuses on crossbreeding and the relationship of destruction and creation.”

opens Feb 12:

The Neighbors
 Paweł Althamer

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC


On view on the Fourth, Third, and Second Floor galleries of New Museum, this will be the first US museum exhibition devoted to the work of Paweł Althamer. Since the early 1990s, Althamer (b. 1967 Warsaw, Poland) has established a unique artistic practice and is admired for his expanded approach to sculptural representation and his experimental models of social collaboration. Althamer is predominantly known for figurative sculptures of himself, his family, and various other individuals within his community. The exhibition will include a new presentation of the artist’s work Draftsmen’s Congress, originally presented at the 7th Berlin Biennial (2012). Over the course of the exhibition, the blank white space of the New Museum’s Fourth Floor gallery will be transformed through the gradual accumulation of drawings and paintings by Museum visitors and more than seventy invited community organizations. Althamer will also activate the exhibition through a sculptural workshop in which the artist and his collaborators will produce new works during the course of the show. For the duration of the exhibition, visitors bringing new or gently used men’s coats to the New Museum will receive free entry. All the coats will be donated to the Bowery Mission.

Recommended:

A Human Extension
 curated by Amy Berger
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC (bt Delancey & Broome)

Artists Include: Isaac Arvold, Erik Benson, Julie Elizabeth Brady, Paul Brainard, Monica Cook, Melissa Cooke, Peter Drake, MaDora Frey, Jane LaFarge Hamill, Aaron Johnson, Christian Johnson, Michael Kagan, Karl LaRocca, Francesco Logenecker, Daniel Maidman, Lindsay Mound, Reuben Negron, Javier Piñon, Colette Robbins, Jean-Pierre Roy, Michael Schall, Kristen Schiele, Andrew Smenos, Melanie Vote, Frank Webster, Eric White, Barnaby Whitfield, Mike Womack

a celebration of the accessory, the exhibition features twenty-eight artists who, through drawings, paintings, collage and mixed-media, explore the role of fashion in contemporary visual culture. The show re-conceptualizes the fashion accessory, here with geological accessory designs by Jacqueline Popovic, as both sculptural and utilitarian.  - thru Feb 16

opens tomorrow, Jan 17, 6-9p:“All My Work Is Posthumous” Alex KvaresMulherin + Pollard Gallery, 187 Chrystie St., NYCUkranian born artist Kvares drawings radiate a quietness and an equally hypnotic power. In one series of works, Kvares uses an old book of graph paper, working grid by tiny grid to make what appear to be intricate maps or blueprints of some magnificent, cosmic creation. there’s a system within these beautiful works, which seems adhered to and subsequently ignored, each careful decision can be felt, as well as the hours spent creating them. Another series, like the work pictured above, feature creatures, hikers, campers drawn with his signature delicate touch. - thru Feb 16

opens tomorrow, Jan 17, 6-9p:

All My Work Is Posthumous
 Alex Kvares

Mulherin + Pollard Gallery, 187 Chrystie St., NYC

Ukranian born artist Kvares drawings radiate a quietness and an equally hypnotic power. In one series of works, Kvares uses an old book of graph paper, working grid by tiny grid to make what appear to be intricate maps or blueprints of some magnificent, cosmic creation. there’s a system within these beautiful works, which seems adhered to and subsequently ignored, each careful decision can be felt, as well as the hours spent creating them. Another series, like the work pictured above, feature creatures, hikers, campers drawn with his signature delicate touch. - thru Feb 16

opens Thurs, Jan 16, 6-8p:

Gestos Urbanos | Urban Gestures
 Juan Fernando Herrán, Kevin Simón Mancera, Jaime Tarazona
 

Johannes Vogt Gallery, 526 W26th St., NYC (#205)

The works, by three Colombian artists, brought together for this show offer a range of approaches, from drawing to sculpture to overpainted etchings. Each artist alludes to an overlaying of historical and contemporary urbanism as a structure that binds inhabitants to territories, be it through architecture, public spaces, or local news. - thru Feb 22

opens tonight, Jan 1, 6-9p:“Hot Chicks” Adam Green The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYCan exhibition of new drawings that “explore the female form in unexpected ways, using oil crayons and an assortment of pencils and pens… Bordering on architecture or furniture design, the works are only recognizable as female as each has at least one boob; though most have way, way too many boobs… Green’s unconscious has a somewhat 8-bit sensibility. The bodies are often composed of proliferating blocks, with some including too many eye blocks, too many aforementioned boob blocks, too many mouth blocks, etc. It is as though the image inventory chip to his Nintendo cartridge was functioning properly, however the programming chip that assorted, organized and placed the blocks was malfunctioning.” - thru Jan 31

opens tonight, Jan 1, 6-9p:

Hot Chicks
 Adam Green
 

The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYC

an exhibition of new drawings that “explore the female form in unexpected ways, using oil crayons and an assortment of pencils and pens… Bordering on architecture or furniture design, the works are only recognizable as female as each has at least one boob; though most have way, way too many boobs… Green’s unconscious has a somewhat 8-bit sensibility. The bodies are often composed of proliferating blocks, with some including too many eye blocks, too many aforementioned boob blocks, too many mouth blocks, etc. It is as though the image inventory chip to his Nintendo cartridge was functioning properly, however the programming chip that assorted, organized and placed the blocks was malfunctioning.” - thru Jan 31

thru Mar 10:

Isa Genzken: Retrospective
 

MoMA, 11 W53rd St., NYC

Isa Genzken is arguably one of the most important and influential female artists of the past 30 years. This exhibition, the first comprehensive retrospective of her diverse body of work in an American museum, and the largest to date, encompasses Genzken’s work in all mediums over the past 40 years. Although a New York art audience might be familiar with Genzken’s more recent assemblage sculptures, the breadth of her achievement—which includes not only three-dimensional work but also paintings, photographs, collages, drawings, artist’s books, films, and public sculptures—is still largely unknown in this country. Many of the roughly 150 objects in the exhibition are on view in the United States for the first time.