nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Fall 2014 Editors Pick
just opened:

Taxonomy
 George Boorujy

The Arsenal Gallery, Central Park, NYC
(830 Fifth Avenue at 64th Street, Third Floor)

a collection of George Boorujy’s dynamic large-scale paintings of North American animals with disarmingly human characteristics, as well as a series of his preliminary clay models and drawings. Boorujy’s hyperrealistic drawings recall the scientific detail of James John Audubon; however he takes liberties with the composition of his subjects, which adds a surrealistic element to his work. He begins his process by creating clay models to achieve slightly fantastic compositions unseen in nature, but that at the same time seem plausible. His extremely detailed portraits are rendered in ink on white paper backgrounds and can measure up to eleven feet long. The scale, meticulous craftsmanship and limited context encourage viewers to pause and see the animals as they never have before. - thru Oct 25

Artist Talk: October 13, 6pm

read our 2012 interview with George Boorujy HERE

Opens Sun, Sept 7, 6-8p:

Spirit Girls
 Kristen Schiele

Lu Magnus Gallery, 55 Hester St., NYC

Figurative elements float within Schiele’s pattern heavy, lo-fi illustrative, yet playful spatial environments, resulting in a dream-like quality. In imagining the interior and material world of Schiele’s future girl (one in which Schiele imagines her small daughter may create and inhabit as a teenager - her thoughts and creative plans, as well as the architecture and institutions that shape her), Schiele seeks to capture the inspired vision, freedom and lightness in making art for the joy of it. Humor and naiveté are reflected in the writings, experimental drawings, posters and the graffiti a future, semi-fictional realm. Layered, non-linear narratives, ballpoint pen doodles and frequent bursts of bold neon-colored patterns, infuse the work with a graphic novel sensibility.  - thru Oct 12

Opens Sept 4, 6-8p:“The Arrival of Spring” David Hockney Pace Gallery, 508 W25th St., NYCfeatures recent iPad prints, charcoal drawings and a video installation depicting the gradual change from winter to spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire.pictured: The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011 (twenty eleven)-23 February, 2011. iPad drawing printed on paper, 55 x 41-1/2”

Opens Sept 4, 6-8p:

The Arrival of Spring
 David Hockney
 
Pace Gallery, 508 W25th St., NYC

features recent iPad prints, charcoal drawings and a video installation depicting the gradual change from winter to spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire.

pictured:
The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011 (twenty eleven)-23 February, 2011.
iPad drawing printed on paper, 55 x 41-1/2”

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Thurs, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Drawings
 Do Ho Suh
 
Lehmann Maupin, 40 W26th St., NYC
Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie St., NYC

an exhibition of new works by renowned Korean artist Do Ho Suh. On display at both 540 West 26th Street and 201 Chrystie Street, the exhibition will highlight the significant role and varied forms drawing plays in Suh’s oeuvre. This two-part show will feature the range of his works on paper, including drawings using pencil, pen, ink, and watercolor, his unique “thread” drawings, as well as his large-scale rubbings. Primarily known for his room-scale installations made of transparent fabric that recreate spaces in which he has lived, the artist has consistently utilized drawing throughout his career to explore and develop relationships between common themes of his practice including notions of home, physical space, displacement, identity, and memory. A focus of this exhibition, and Suh’s most elaborate use of drawing to date, is his Rubbing/Loving Project. Here Suh painstakingly covered the flat walls and three-dimensional fixtures of the interior and exterior of architectural spaces that hold great personal, cultural, or historic significance to him with vellum and rubbed each surface with colored pencil or graphite.

thru Aug 3:“Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010”The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCSigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

thru Aug 3:

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

Sigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

closes soon (June 15):

Lebbeus Woods, Architect
 
The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC

The exhibition brings together works from the past forty years by architect Lebbeus Woods, centering on transformation as a recurring theme and providing a framework for understanding the experimental nature of his work. Acknowledging the parallels between society’s physical and psychological constructions, Woods has depicted a career-long narrative of how these constructions transform our being. Working mostly, but not exclusively, with pencil on paper, Woods has created an oeuvre of complex worlds—at times abstract and at times explicit—that present shifts, cycles, repetitions within the built environment. His timeless architecture is not in a particular style or in response to a singular moment in the field; rather, it offers an opportunity to consider how built forms impact the individual and the collective, and reflect contemporary political, social and ideological conditions, and how one person contributes to the development and mutation of the built world.

opens tomorrow, Fri, May 16, 7-9p:

MARGINS
 Frank Webster
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC (bt Delancey & Broome)

Webster’s paintings depict post-industrial landscapes drawing on the aesthetic traditions of minimalism and realism. Summoning a sense of apocalyptic abandonedness, Webster’s compositions pair high-rise buildings with similarly scaled trees, liken barbed-wire fences and electrical wires to the creeping vines that entwine them, and present an urban ecosystem curiously devoid of inhabitants. - thru June 1

recently opened:“mountain girl door” Kim Jones Pierogi Gallery, 177 North 9th St., Brooklyn, NY [ Map ]This exhibition includes drawings and paintings on paper begun as early as 1971 and completed in 2013–2014, following Kim Jones’ uncommon habit of allowing work he considers incomplete to sit, sometimes for years, working back into them from time to time until he is satisfied with the results. Also included are recently completed war drawings, and three new sculptures. In the 1970’s Jones’ performance persona, “Mudman,” could be seen roaming the streets of Los Angeles and Venice, CA and later, in the 1980’s, in New York City; always covered in mud, a nylon stocking stretched over his face, and carrying on his back an unwieldy and crudely constructed lattice-work structure of sticks, tape, mud, and twine. From the beginning he was also drawing, painting, and making three-dimensional works. His two-dimensional pieces range from intricate graphite drawings involving X and dot figures and erasure, indicating movement of each force (referred to as “war drawings”); to works that incorporate acrylic paint, ink line work, and collage; to paintings on photographs (most often of his own past performances), many of which have been made over a period of thirty plus years.

recently opened:

mountain girl door
 Kim Jones
 
Pierogi Gallery, 177 North 9th St., Brooklyn, NY [ Map ]

This exhibition includes drawings and paintings on paper begun as early as 1971 and completed in 2013–2014, following Kim Jones’ uncommon habit of allowing work he considers incomplete to sit, sometimes for years, working back into them from time to time until he is satisfied with the results. Also included are recently completed war drawings, and three new sculptures. In the 1970’s Jones’ performance persona, “Mudman,” could be seen roaming the streets of Los Angeles and Venice, CA and later, in the 1980’s, in New York City; always covered in mud, a nylon stocking stretched over his face, and carrying on his back an unwieldy and crudely constructed lattice-work structure of sticks, tape, mud, and twine. From the beginning he was also drawing, painting, and making three-dimensional works. His two-dimensional pieces range from intricate graphite drawings involving X and dot figures and erasure, indicating movement of each force (referred to as “war drawings”); to works that incorporate acrylic paint, ink line work, and collage; to paintings on photographs (most often of his own past performances), many of which have been made over a period of thirty plus years.

Opens April 11:

Submerged Motherlands
 Swoon
 
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYC

Brooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago.

photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq

Fri, Feb 21, 3p:“Theodore’s Drawing Salon” by Ted Barrow, curated by Alise Tifentale Engineer’s Office Gallery, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, NYC (bt 48th and 49th St)These Drawing Salons began with a fascination of 19th century parlor culture combined with an innocuous and particular pleasure taken from drawing with friends. The project will involve a group of artists meeting at the Engineer’s Office Gallery, touring the galleries of Christie’s and drawing a selected group of objects or images on auction, then installing their renditions of these images in the space provided. The drawings, once installed, can be photographed and documented however each artist wants, but left in the space with the understanding that they will likely be taken down and destroyed by a third party. Although the format and size of the paper will not be regulated, ink drawings are a must. Theodore’s Drawing Salon is an attempt to reflect on the seemingly victorious digitalization of the present-day culture. As a comment to the era of easily accessible tools of digital image-making and platforms for image-sharing, the Salon proposes an explicitly analog image-making and image-sharing environment. Yet the Salon will have its online presence and the team will happily engage in discussion and dissemination of the drawings.pictured: William-Adolphe Bouguereau, The Oreads, 1902

Fri, Feb 21, 3p:

Theodore’s Drawing Salon
 by Ted Barrow, curated by Alise Tifentale
 
Engineer’s Office Gallery, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, NYC (bt 48th and 49th St)

These Drawing Salons began with a fascination of 19th century parlor culture combined with an innocuous and particular pleasure taken from drawing with friends. The project will involve a group of artists meeting at the Engineer’s Office Gallery, touring the galleries of Christie’s and drawing a selected group of objects or images on auction, then installing their renditions of these images in the space provided. The drawings, once installed, can be photographed and documented however each artist wants, but left in the space with the understanding that they will likely be taken down and destroyed by a third party. Although the format and size of the paper will not be regulated, ink drawings are a must. Theodore’s Drawing Salon is an attempt to reflect on the seemingly victorious digitalization of the present-day culture. As a comment to the era of easily accessible tools of digital image-making and platforms for image-sharing, the Salon proposes an explicitly analog image-making and image-sharing environment. Yet the Salon will have its online presence and the team will happily engage in discussion and dissemination of the drawings.

pictured: William-Adolphe Bouguereau, The Oreads, 1902