nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Recommended
Opens Sun, Mar 2nd, 6-8p:

Crosseyed and Painless
 Daniel Rios Rodriguez

Sargent’s Daughters, 179 East B’Way, NYC


Daniel Rios Rodriguez’s work combines the intensely personal with the historical in a manner both humorous and dark.  The paintings begin with drawing into a thick layer of oil paint, and can include collage elements of raw canvas, linen and the scraps of old t-shirts onto the canvas. This is a means of recovery and reinstating a fresh surface, exploring the materiality and variety of textures a painting’s surface can have.

The subject matter of the work spans the immediate and classical: skulls, lemons and tall grass along a river are repeated- calling to mind the traditional vanitas pieces. The search is ongoing and the images are abundant.
- thru Mar 30

recently opened:

Family Business
 Paul Edlin
 
Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)

“This truth is that if it hadn’t been for Paul Edlin (1931 - 2008), this gallery never would have existed…  Born in 1931 with a profound hearing loss, Paul Edlin never found a steady career path but had always been interested in art. Finally, in 1972 at the age of 41, he enrolled in art classes over a period of about ten years at the Art Students League and New School, where he was mentored by renowned American artists Will Barnet and Henry Pearson. In the early 1980s Edlin began incorporating postage stamps into his artworks and by the 90s was using them exclusively, choosing them from those of many nations for colors and visual texture. He sliced them into tiny pieces, which he used like mosaic tiles, gluing them on museum board until his compositions were finalized. His scenes of people and mythological figures, animals and objects suggest a mystical personal cosmology. His 16 x 20 inch collages could take as long as three months to complete, and he worked diligently every day, alone in his one-room New York apartment.” - Andrew Edlin

Recommended:

A Human Extension
 curated by Amy Berger
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC (bt Delancey & Broome)

Artists Include: Isaac Arvold, Erik Benson, Julie Elizabeth Brady, Paul Brainard, Monica Cook, Melissa Cooke, Peter Drake, MaDora Frey, Jane LaFarge Hamill, Aaron Johnson, Christian Johnson, Michael Kagan, Karl LaRocca, Francesco Logenecker, Daniel Maidman, Lindsay Mound, Reuben Negron, Javier Piñon, Colette Robbins, Jean-Pierre Roy, Michael Schall, Kristen Schiele, Andrew Smenos, Melanie Vote, Frank Webster, Eric White, Barnaby Whitfield, Mike Womack

a celebration of the accessory, the exhibition features twenty-eight artists who, through drawings, paintings, collage and mixed-media, explore the role of fashion in contemporary visual culture. The show re-conceptualizes the fashion accessory, here with geological accessory designs by Jacqueline Popovic, as both sculptural and utilitarian.  - thru Feb 16

opens tonight, Jan 17, 7-9p:

BORDERLINES
 Levan Mindiashvili

The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC

Levan Mindiashvili’s first solo exhibition in the United States. The paintings are a study of his reflections on cities as both public and private meeting points. Originally conceived in Buenos Aires, this recent body of work explores the artist’s personal and collective experiences with the architecture and public structures of New York, where he is currently based. His new work depicts distorted, almost abstract fragments of old architecture reflected on new, transparent surfaces or seen through them. “I perceive them as maps of consciousness of the contemporary world with its migrations, gentrification, identity and social issues,” Mindiashvili explains, “I want to trigger a dialogue about recent history.”  - thru Feb 4

thru Dec 21:

Hobby and Work
 Guðmundur Thoroddsen
 

Asya Geisberg Gallery, 537b W23rd St., NYC

Thoroddsen continues his exploration into the tropes of modern masculinity. In “Hobby and Work”, he merges the antiquity-laced bearded busts of male gods with activities such as basketball, hunting, and brewing beer. In his group scenes in gouache, pencil, collage, and ink on paper, men are organized as if in a Byzantine painting, without Renaissance perspective, but rather a staggered organization. Employing an often cartoonish style, Thoroddsen sometimes veers into boyish naughtiness, like dirty doodles carved into a school desk. Thoroddsen charts a circle of manly aspiration: winning a trophy, competing for points, length of beard, or number of birds killed.  With a pallid color scheme of vaguely Eastern European or 1930s colors, Thoroddsen’s drawings exist in a timeless haze. Along with the works on paper, Thoroddsen continues his carved wooden heads with a rougher style and blended identity.

thru Mar 10:

Isa Genzken: Retrospective
 

MoMA, 11 W53rd St., NYC

Isa Genzken is arguably one of the most important and influential female artists of the past 30 years. This exhibition, the first comprehensive retrospective of her diverse body of work in an American museum, and the largest to date, encompasses Genzken’s work in all mediums over the past 40 years. Although a New York art audience might be familiar with Genzken’s more recent assemblage sculptures, the breadth of her achievement—which includes not only three-dimensional work but also paintings, photographs, collages, drawings, artist’s books, films, and public sculptures—is still largely unknown in this country. Many of the roughly 150 objects in the exhibition are on view in the United States for the first time.

thru Dec 21:Ilya & Emilia KabakovPace Gallery, 32 East 57th St., NYC“Featuring seven paintings from recent series and the 2003 installation I Catch the Little White Man, Pace Gallery’s exhibition is part of a constellation of events celebrating the artists’ life and work throughout New York City. Widely regarded as Russia’s most celebrated artists, Ilya and Emilia Kabakov are recognized for their work internationally which extends beyond their years under the Soviet Union in an address of the human condition universally. Incorporating themes of memory and illusion, their work commonly plays with the concept of a dual reality.”

thru Dec 21:

Ilya & Emilia Kabakov

Pace Gallery, 32 East 57th St., NYC

“Featuring seven paintings from recent series and the 2003 installation I Catch the Little White Man, Pace Gallery’s exhibition is part of a constellation of events celebrating the artists’ life and work throughout New York City. Widely regarded as Russia’s most celebrated artists, Ilya and Emilia Kabakov are recognized for their work internationally which extends beyond their years under the Soviet Union in an address of the human condition universally. Incorporating themes of memory and illusion, their work commonly plays with the concept of a dual reality.”

Opens Fri, Nov 15, 6-8p:

Mequitta Ahuja

Thierry Goldberg Gallery, 103 Norfolk St., NYC

“Ahuja references a variety of cultural traditions, including the arts of Africa, Asia, and America… she suggests that identity is not only fluid, but that it represents a layering of different guises—both real and fictional, historic and contemporary. Her work also demonstrates an interest in different types of marks and materials. She employs hand stamps, paints with brushes, and draws directly onto the collaged ground.”  - National Portrait Gallery

“My self-portraits are “auto-mythic.” I define automythography as a process of identity formation that combines the real with the self-invented. I position myself within a history of Eastern and Western representation, reflecting my identity as an African American and South Asian American woman. My sources include Buddhist wall paintings and Mughal manuscript art.” - Mequitta Ahuja

ongoing thru Jan 12:

The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926–1938
 Magritte

MoMA, 11 W53rd St., NYC (5th/6th Aves)

Bringing together some 80 paintings, collages, and objects, along with a selection of photographs, periodicals, and early commercial work, the exhibition is the first to focus exclusively on the breakthrough Surrealist years of René Magritte, creator of some of the 20th century’s most extraordinary images. Beginning in 1926, when Magritte first aimed to create paintings that would, in his words, “challenge the real world,” and concluding in 1938—a historically and biographically significant moment just prior to the outbreak of World War II—the exhibition traces central strategies and themes from the most inventive and experimental period in the artist’s prolific career. Displacement, transformation, metamorphosis, the “misnaming” of objects, and the representation of visions seen in half-waking states are among Magritte’s innovative image-making tactics during these essential years.

Opens Oct 30, 6-8p:“The Swimming Lessons (1981), Translating Duchamp’s Green Box” Robert C. MorganRooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYCfirst New York showing of this complete work, which has remained in storage since its first venue at the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita, Kansas (1981). Morgan became involved in studying the work of Duchamp and was taken by the following passage excerpted from an interview with Pierre Cabanne: “…I didn’t just float along! I had eight years of swimming lessons.” Morgan decided to use a phrase from this quote for his conceptually based work. The project involved working in many mediums, ranging from drawing to artists’ books, from painting to performance (many of which occurred in swimming pools), from super-8 film to video. One of his most important works was a series of ten drawings completed in 1981, involving photographs taken systemically from a videotape of two young women translating Duchamp’s Green Box notes. Although the original tape of this translation apparently disappeared, the still photographs, taken by the artist, were used to create a conceptual work, titled The Swimming Lessons. - thru Dec 1

Opens Oct 30, 6-8p:

The Swimming Lessons (1981), Translating Duchamp’s Green Box
 Robert C. Morgan

Rooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYC

first New York showing of this complete work, which has remained in storage since its first venue at the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita, Kansas (1981). Morgan became involved in studying the work of Duchamp and was taken by the following passage excerpted from an interview with Pierre Cabanne: “…I didn’t just float along! I had eight years of swimming lessons.” Morgan decided to use a phrase from this quote for his conceptually based work. The project involved working in many mediums, ranging from drawing to artists’ books, from painting to performance (many of which occurred in swimming pools), from super-8 film to video. One of his most important works was a series of ten drawings completed in 1981, involving photographs taken systemically from a videotape of two young women translating Duchamp’s Green Box notes. Although the original tape of this translation apparently disappeared, the still photographs, taken by the artist, were used to create a conceptual work, titled The Swimming Lessons. - thru Dec 1