nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:“Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future” Nir HodPaul Kasmin Gallery, 515 W27th St., NYCexhibition of painting and sculpture features a large sculptural work, a snowglobe containing a moving scale model of a pumpjack encased in oil and swirling “snow” comprised of gold-colored flakes, a reflection of the immense wealth generated by the oil trade. Characteristic of Hod’s work is a dark glamour that is both alluring and menacing, exemplified in his three new series of paintings. In I Want Always to be Remembered in Your Heart, smoldering flames are superimposed on delicate flowers, alluding to the paradoxical coexistence of beauty and destruction. - thru Oct 25

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future
 Nir Hod

Paul Kasmin Gallery, 515 W27th St., NYC

exhibition of painting and sculpture features a large sculptural work, a snowglobe containing a moving scale model of a pumpjack encased in oil and swirling “snow” comprised of gold-colored flakes, a reflection of the immense wealth generated by the oil trade. Characteristic of Hod’s work is a dark glamour that is both alluring and menacing, exemplified in his three new series of paintings. In I Want Always to be Remembered in Your Heart, smoldering flames are superimposed on delicate flowers, alluding to the paradoxical coexistence of beauty and destruction. - thru Oct 25

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:“PeaRoeFoam” Jason RhoadesDavid Zwirner Gallery, 537 W20th St., NYCthe show will be a reinstatement of the artist’s PeaRoeFoam project, which debuted at the gallery in 2002 (then located on Greene Street in SoHo) in the first of a trilogy of exhibitions that also brought it to Vienna and Liverpool the same year. A seminal work within Rhoades’s career, it has not been exhibited as a comprehensive presentation until now and many of the individual components are shown here for the first time since the original installations. PeaRoeFoam was Rhoades’s self-made recipe for a “brand new product and revolutionary new material” created from whole green peas, fish-bait style salmon eggs, and white virgin-beaded foam. When combined with non-toxic glue, they transform into a versatile, fast-drying, and ultimately hard material that Rhoades intended for both utilitarian as well as artistic use—made accessible in the form of do-it-yourself “kits,” complete with everything needed to make PeaRoeFoam, accompanied by the artist’s detailed, step-by-step instructions. - thru Oct 18

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

PeaRoeFoam
 Jason Rhoades

David Zwirner Gallery, 537 W20th St., NYC

the show will be a reinstatement of the artist’s PeaRoeFoam project, which debuted at the gallery in 2002 (then located on Greene Street in SoHo) in the first of a trilogy of exhibitions that also brought it to Vienna and Liverpool the same year. A seminal work within Rhoades’s career, it has not been exhibited as a comprehensive presentation until now and many of the individual components are shown here for the first time since the original installations. PeaRoeFoam was Rhoades’s self-made recipe for a “brand new product and revolutionary new material” created from whole green peas, fish-bait style salmon eggs, and white virgin-beaded foam. When combined with non-toxic glue, they transform into a versatile, fast-drying, and ultimately hard material that Rhoades intended for both utilitarian as well as artistic use—made accessible in the form of do-it-yourself “kits,” complete with everything needed to make PeaRoeFoam, accompanied by the artist’s detailed, step-by-step instructions. - thru Oct 18

Opens tonight, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Dust Paintings
 Jenny Holzer

Cheim & Read Gallery, 547 W25th St., NYC

Language has been Holzer’s primary medium since the late 1970s. Placed on electronic signs or stone benches, Holzer’s text investigates how ideas are transformed from argument or opinion into fact. While her work has a conceptual base, she involves her viewer through what’s intensely physical. The documents painted most recently trace the political fallout and human wreckage in the global war on terror. The content of her new work is traced, transferred, and each letter and its surround are carefully hand-painted and re-painted. Holzer’s process echoes and amplifies traditional Arabic calligraphy–ghubar–which translates, literally, as “dust writing.” - thru Oct 25

Opens Tomorrow, Sept 4, 6-8p:“Denuded Lens” Roxy PaineMarianne Boesky Gallery,  509 W24th St., NYCFrom the Painting Machines, to the Replicants, to the Dendroids, Paine’s practice illuminates the aesthetic and conceptual paradoxes that lie at the heart of the contemporary condition, addressing the particular tension that arises when chaos and control, fact and artifice, the organic and the industrial, meet. At the center of this exhibition is Checkpoint, the most recent iteration of his latest series, the large-scale Dioramas. A room-sized vision of a generic airport security stop, Checkpoint presents a locale whose practical banality rests uneasily alongside the looming suggestion of larger social anxieties.  - thru Oct 18

Opens Tomorrow, Sept 4, 6-8p:

Denuded Lens
 Roxy Paine

Marianne Boesky Gallery,  509 W24th St., NYC

From the Painting Machines, to the Replicants, to the Dendroids, Paine’s practice illuminates the aesthetic and conceptual paradoxes that lie at the heart of the contemporary condition, addressing the particular tension that arises when chaos and control, fact and artifice, the organic and the industrial, meet. At the center of this exhibition is Checkpoint, the most recent iteration of his latest series, the large-scale Dioramas. A room-sized vision of a generic airport security stop, Checkpoint presents a locale whose practical banality rests uneasily alongside the looming suggestion of larger social anxieties.  - thru Oct 18

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Thurs, Sept 11, 6-8p:

Drawings
 Do Ho Suh
 
Lehmann Maupin, 40 W26th St., NYC
Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie St., NYC

an exhibition of new works by renowned Korean artist Do Ho Suh. On display at both 540 West 26th Street and 201 Chrystie Street, the exhibition will highlight the significant role and varied forms drawing plays in Suh’s oeuvre. This two-part show will feature the range of his works on paper, including drawings using pencil, pen, ink, and watercolor, his unique “thread” drawings, as well as his large-scale rubbings. Primarily known for his room-scale installations made of transparent fabric that recreate spaces in which he has lived, the artist has consistently utilized drawing throughout his career to explore and develop relationships between common themes of his practice including notions of home, physical space, displacement, identity, and memory. A focus of this exhibition, and Suh’s most elaborate use of drawing to date, is his Rubbing/Loving Project. Here Suh painstakingly covered the flat walls and three-dimensional fixtures of the interior and exterior of architectural spaces that hold great personal, cultural, or historic significance to him with vellum and rubbed each surface with colored pencil or graphite.

thru Aug 10:Tara Donovan Pace Gallery, 534 W25th St., NYCPresents two new large-scale sculptures comprised from index cards and acrylic rods, respectively. With these works, the artist continues to explore the phenomenological effect of work created through the accumulation of identical objects. Untitled (index cards), the first such work created by Donovan, is a 13’ x 25’ x 30’ sculpture in eight parts comprised of several million 3x5” white cards stacked and glued into scores of interweaving columnar forms combining to reach a summit on each element. Also featured is a newly completed untitled sculpture made with thousands of acrylic rods. Donovan spends months or even years searching for a method of assembly that allows the simple and immutable characteristics of the chosen material to generate complex, emergent phenomena which keep the viewer cycling between perception of the parts and the whole between the forms themselves and the light that surrounds and divides them. The work draws on both Minimalist and formalist histories, while creating a radically new form which embraces complexity and iterative processing.

thru Aug 10:

Tara Donovan
 
Pace Gallery, 534 W25th St., NYC

Presents two new large-scale sculptures comprised from index cards and acrylic rods, respectively. With these works, the artist continues to explore the phenomenological effect of work created through the accumulation of identical objects. Untitled (index cards), the first such work created by Donovan, is a 13’ x 25’ x 30’ sculpture in eight parts comprised of several million 3x5” white cards stacked and glued into scores of interweaving columnar forms combining to reach a summit on each element. Also featured is a newly completed untitled sculpture made with thousands of acrylic rods. Donovan spends months or even years searching for a method of assembly that allows the simple and immutable characteristics of the chosen material to generate complex, emergent phenomena which keep the viewer cycling between perception of the parts and the whole between the forms themselves and the light that surrounds and divides them. The work draws on both Minimalist and formalist histories, while creating a radically new form which embraces complexity and iterative processing.

newly opened:

All this happened, more or less
 Elizabeth Glaessner
 
P.P.O.W Gallery, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)

Glaessner combines familiar objects with misunderstood and idiosyncratic portraits, often laden with humor that counterpoint her macabre imagery. An exploration of memory, personal history and ritual, Glaessner’s work questions the way in which we relate to and envision our past. Her most recent paintings depict a highly detailed mythology of post-human existence on earth that features anthropomorphic, gelatinous figures in familiar, yet toxic, landscapes. These organic creatures appear as if born from natural forms, like tree trunks and rock formations, in attempt to reconstruct lost histories through the detritus left behind. - thru Aug 15

recommended: opening tonight in 2 locations, 6-8p:“ANOTHER LOOK at DETROIT: PARTS 1 and 2” curated by Todd Levin  Marianne Boesky Gallery, 509 W24th St., NYCMarlborough Chelsea Gallery, 545 W25th St., NYCA joint project between Marianne Boesky Gallery and Marlborough Chelsea, Another Look at Detroit presents works and objects by over fifty artists, designers, and cultural contributors. The focus of this exhibition is the city of Detroit as a creative center, historically through to today. Spanning a period of 150 years, and taking place at both galleries’ Chelsea spaces, this exhibition is by no means a comprehensive survey. Rather, Another Look at Detroit intends to portray a vision as sprawling and complex as the biography of the city itself.pictured: Diego Rivera, Edsel B. Ford, 1932, Oil on canvas

recommended: opening tonight in 2 locations, 6-8p:

ANOTHER LOOK at DETROIT: PARTS 1 and 2
 curated by Todd Levin
 
Marianne Boesky Gallery, 509 W24th St., NYC
Marlborough Chelsea Gallery, 545 W25th St., NYC

A joint project between Marianne Boesky Gallery and Marlborough Chelsea, Another Look at Detroit presents works and objects by over fifty artists, designers, and cultural contributors. The focus of this exhibition is the city of Detroit as a creative center, historically through to today. Spanning a period of 150 years, and taking place at both galleries’ Chelsea spaces, this exhibition is by no means a comprehensive survey. Rather, Another Look at Detroit intends to portray a vision as sprawling and complex as the biography of the city itself.

pictured: Diego Rivera, Edsel B. Ford, 1932, Oil on canvas

opens tomorrow, June 19, 6-8p:“Begotten, Not Made” Nicola Samori Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYCMore than a trick of the eye, Samori’s paintings treat their surface as a material skin transcribing the memory of their process. “Like the eye adjusting to darkness, adaptation is necessary upon entering Samori’s visual cosmos. The images stare at us in an effort of denied vision. With the icy gaze of a femme fatale warning us that she is beyond our reach, they block our penetration. The images feel us, smell us, judge us. They are watching, but they don’t see. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. And we see through a glass, darkly. Sometimes peering in, other times peeling back in search of the surface beneath the surface beneath the surface.”

opens tomorrow, June 19, 6-8p:

Begotten, Not Made
 Nicola Samori
 
Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYC

More than a trick of the eye, Samori’s paintings treat their surface as a material skin transcribing the memory of their process. “Like the eye adjusting to darkness, adaptation is necessary upon entering Samori’s visual cosmos. The images stare at us in an effort of denied vision. With the icy gaze of a femme fatale warning us that she is beyond our reach, they block our penetration. The images feel us, smell us, judge us. They are watching, but they don’t see. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. And we see through a glass, darkly. Sometimes peering in, other times peeling back in search of the surface beneath the surface beneath the surface.”

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:“Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival at the End of the World” Kahn & Selesnick Yancey Richardson Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYCUtilizing photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and performance, Kahn & Selesnick create robust mythic realities for each project, building imaginary, character-driven fictions from kernels of obscure historical truth. This exhibition follows a fictitious cabaret troupe – Truppe Fledermaus (Bat Troupe) – who travel the countryside staging absurd and inscrutable performances in abandoned landscapes for an audience of no one. The playful but dire message presented by the troupe is of impending ecological disaster, caused by rising waters and a warming planet, the immediate consequences of which include the extinction of the Bat, in this mythology a shamanistic figure representing both nature and humanity. In one sense, the entire cabaret troupe can be seen as a direct reflection of the artists themselves, both entities employing farce and black humor to engage utterly serious concerns. - thru July 3

opens tonight, Thurs, May 15, 6-8p:

Truppe Fledermaus & The Carnival at the End of the World
 Kahn & Selesnick
 
Yancey Richardson Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYC

Utilizing photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture and performance, Kahn & Selesnick create robust mythic realities for each project, building imaginary, character-driven fictions from kernels of obscure historical truth. This exhibition follows a fictitious cabaret troupe – Truppe Fledermaus (Bat Troupe) – who travel the countryside staging absurd and inscrutable performances in abandoned landscapes for an audience of no one. The playful but dire message presented by the troupe is of impending ecological disaster, caused by rising waters and a warming planet, the immediate consequences of which include the extinction of the Bat, in this mythology a shamanistic figure representing both nature and humanity. In one sense, the entire cabaret troupe can be seen as a direct reflection of the artists themselves, both entities employing farce and black humor to engage utterly serious concerns. - thru July 3