nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

opens Apr 17, 6-8p:

Day by Day, Good Day
 Peter Dreher

Koenig & Clinton Gallery, 459 W19th St., NYC

a historical exhibition presenting paintings from 1974-2012. Dreher began his series Tag um Tag Guter Tag (Day by Day, Good Day) after painting his first glass in 1972. Dreher continued rendering a single empty water glass repeatedly, by day and by night, and has continued doing so over the course of several decades. The title of the series is linked to a Zen Buddhist maxim that espouses the equanimity of all things and objective perception of the world. Schooled as a figurative painter, the artist has remained steadfast to this commitment over the years, painting the same glass, within the same surroundings, from the same angle every day. To date, the series includes nearly 5,000 individual paintings. - thru May 24

Opens Tonight, 6-8p:“The Super Can Man and Other Illustrated Classics” Kristen Morgin Zach Feuer Gallery, 548 W22nd St., NYCThe exhibition is populated with sculptures, composed primarily of unfired clay and paint, of super heroes and heroines found in comic books, fairy tales and popular culture.  Some work is re-created as a single object, such as a Little Golden Book edition of Hansel and Gretel.  Other work, like The Ugly Duckling, is seemingly reimaged from repurposed materials one may have on hand -  the stub of a pencil, a Skippy peanut butter jar top and two painted pieces of wood.

Opens Tonight, 6-8p:

The Super Can Man and Other Illustrated Classics
 Kristen Morgin
 
Zach Feuer Gallery, 548 W22nd St., NYC

The exhibition is populated with sculptures, composed primarily of unfired clay and paint, of super heroes and heroines found in comic books, fairy tales and popular culture.  Some work is re-created as a single object, such as a Little Golden Book edition of Hansel and Gretel.  Other work, like The Ugly Duckling, is seemingly reimaged from repurposed materials one may have on hand -  the stub of a pencil, a Skippy peanut butter jar top and two painted pieces of wood.

just opened:“Overcoming the Modern  Dansaekhwa: The Korean Monochrome Movement” curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath Alexander Gray Gallery, 508 W26th St., NYCIn the late 1950s, a disparate number of young Korean artists discarded realism and figuration and adopted a monochromatic palette and artistic techniques that highlighted the flatness of the canvas as a foundation for later accretions and the physicality of the used materials. By the mid-1970s they had become known as Danseakhwa: The Korean Monochrome Movement. The exhibition features paintings and works on paper by some of the leading figures of Danseakhwa: Chung Sang-hwa, Ha Chong-hyun, Hur Hwang, Lee Dong-Youb, Lee Ufan, Park Seo-bo, and Yun Hyong-keun. Through a selection spanning three decades of artistic production, the exhibition highlights the artists’ efforts to make art that defies national identity and cultural production. The movement highlights the struggle between notions of belonging, national identity, and artistic innovation resulting from a negotiation with local cultural specificity and a Western notion of modernity. - thru Mar 29pictured: Lee Ufan, From Line No. 12–12, 1982Oil and mineral pigment on canvas

just opened:

Overcoming the Modern
 Dansaekhwa: The Korean Monochrome Movement
 curated by Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath
 
Alexander Gray Gallery, 508 W26th St., NYC

In the late 1950s, a disparate number of young Korean artists discarded realism and figuration and adopted a monochromatic palette and artistic techniques that highlighted the flatness of the canvas as a foundation for later accretions and the physicality of the used materials. By the mid-1970s they had become known as Danseakhwa: The Korean Monochrome Movement. The exhibition features paintings and works on paper by some of the leading figures of Danseakhwa: Chung Sang-hwa, Ha Chong-hyun, Hur Hwang, Lee Dong-Youb, Lee Ufan, Park Seo-bo, and Yun Hyong-keun. Through a selection spanning three decades of artistic production, the exhibition highlights the artists’ efforts to make art that defies national identity and cultural production. The movement highlights the struggle between notions of belonging, national identity, and artistic innovation resulting from a negotiation with local cultural specificity and a Western notion of modernity. - thru Mar 29

pictured:
Lee Ufan, From Line No. 12–12, 1982
Oil and mineral pigment on canvas

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:“Synthesa” Erwin Wurm Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYCWorking in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

opens Feb 28, 6-8p:

Synthesa
 Erwin Wurm
 
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 540 W26th St., NYC

Working in a variety of media, including photography, performance, video, and painting, Wurm considers his practice from a sculptural perspective… Comprised of three new sculptural bodies of work, Wurm’s current exhibition continues Wurm’s investigations of volume and abstraction of the human form. Wurm’s series of Abstract Sculptures contort sausage-like forms into bronze sculptures, re-envisioning the classic frankfurter in unexpected contexts to challenge our perceptions of the objects in reality.

recently opened:

Family Business
 Paul Edlin
 
Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)

“This truth is that if it hadn’t been for Paul Edlin (1931 - 2008), this gallery never would have existed…  Born in 1931 with a profound hearing loss, Paul Edlin never found a steady career path but had always been interested in art. Finally, in 1972 at the age of 41, he enrolled in art classes over a period of about ten years at the Art Students League and New School, where he was mentored by renowned American artists Will Barnet and Henry Pearson. In the early 1980s Edlin began incorporating postage stamps into his artworks and by the 90s was using them exclusively, choosing them from those of many nations for colors and visual texture. He sliced them into tiny pieces, which he used like mosaic tiles, gluing them on museum board until his compositions were finalized. His scenes of people and mythological figures, animals and objects suggest a mystical personal cosmology. His 16 x 20 inch collages could take as long as three months to complete, and he worked diligently every day, alone in his one-room New York apartment.” - Andrew Edlin

opens tonight, Jan 30, 6-8p:“Heartbreaking and shit, but that’s the globe. The Battle of Manhattan.” Frohawk Two FeathersMorgan Lehman Gallery, 535 W22nd St., NYCFollowing the artist’s deeply involved narrative, Heartbreaking and Shit presents the “next chapter” in a device of fictionalized history that Two Feathers has become noted for. This latest body of work finds the European colonialists landing in the new world of America and establishing settlements in the Northeast. With settlement comes war, and on this strange new land, the artist’s invented European super-power “Frengland” goes to battle against “New Holland,” both sides allied with various Native American tribes.While Two Feathers has established a broad macro-narrative via¬ his intercontinental, empire-building struggles, the artist has also employed a deeply nuanced micro-narrative. Filled with characters that love, lust, greed and connive their way through the artist’s take on 18th century drama and intrigue, his heroes and heroines may exist in the past, but their essences are a blend of colonialism melded with contemporary urban street culture, influenced greatly by Two Feathers’ background as a hip hop artist. This juxtaposition of new and old, colonial and contemporary raises a myriad of questions for the viewer, primarily in how we reconcile the sins of imperialism with the sins of today.

opens tonight, Jan 30, 6-8p:

“Heartbreaking and shit, but that’s the globe. The Battle of Manhattan.”
 Frohawk Two Feathers

Morgan Lehman Gallery, 535 W22nd St., NYC

Following the artist’s deeply involved narrative, Heartbreaking and Shit presents the “next chapter” in a device of fictionalized history that Two Feathers has become noted for. This latest body of work finds the European colonialists landing in the new world of America and establishing settlements in the Northeast. With settlement comes war, and on this strange new land, the artist’s invented European super-power “Frengland” goes to battle against “New Holland,” both sides allied with various Native American tribes.

While Two Feathers has established a broad macro-narrative via¬ his intercontinental, empire-building struggles, the artist has also employed a deeply nuanced micro-narrative. Filled with characters that love, lust, greed and connive their way through the artist’s take on 18th century drama and intrigue, his heroes and heroines may exist in the past, but their essences are a blend of colonialism melded with contemporary urban street culture, influenced greatly by Two Feathers’ background as a hip hop artist. This juxtaposition of new and old, colonial and contemporary raises a myriad of questions for the viewer, primarily in how we reconcile the sins of imperialism with the sins of today.

continues thru Feb 22:“Future Perfect” Anoka FaruqeeKoenig & Clinton Gallery, 459 W19th St., NYCRecent works from the artist’s ongoing series of Moiré Paintings foreground the début of two new series: the Circle Paintings and the Wave Paintings. By triangulating all three bodies of work Faruqee galvanizes her systematic experimentation with color, perception, and the limits of technological precision. Her simultaneous shift towards larger-scale canvases intensifies the somatic experience of varying retinal patterns. Layer by layer, the artist rakes one selected paint color over the canvas and then later sands the dry surface to erase all resulting grooves and ridges before raking the next set of overlapping lines. Each painting offers evidence of a physical act suspended in the strata of pattern, capturing a momentary glitch that might otherwise pass undetected.

continues thru Feb 22:

Future Perfect
 Anoka Faruqee

Koenig & Clinton Gallery, 459 W19th St., NYC

Recent works from the artist’s ongoing series of Moiré Paintings foreground the début of two new series: the Circle Paintings and the Wave Paintings. By triangulating all three bodies of work Faruqee galvanizes her systematic experimentation with color, perception, and the limits of technological precision. Her simultaneous shift towards larger-scale canvases intensifies the somatic experience of varying retinal patterns. Layer by layer, the artist rakes one selected paint color over the canvas and then later sands the dry surface to erase all resulting grooves and ridges before raking the next set of overlapping lines. Each painting offers evidence of a physical act suspended in the strata of pattern, capturing a momentary glitch that might otherwise pass undetected.

opens tonight, Thurs, Jan 23, 6-8p:“INBETWEEN” Serena Mitnik-MillerJoshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St., NYCWorking primarily in watercolor on paper, Mitnik-Miller’s practice centers on the repetition of patterns and shapes. “Painting and creating has been a part of my life from a very young age. Painting is the most calming of my endeavors, which is most enjoyable, and makes me happy.” - Serena Mitnik-Miller

opens tonight, Thurs, Jan 23, 6-8p:

INBETWEEN
 Serena Mitnik-Miller

Joshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St., NYC

Working primarily in watercolor on paper, Mitnik-Miller’s practice centers on the repetition of patterns and shapes. “Painting and creating has been a part of my life from a very young age. Painting is the most calming of my endeavors, which is most enjoyable, and makes me happy.” - Serena Mitnik-Miller

opens tonight, Thurs, Jan 23, 6-8p:

Horizontal Progressions
 Sol LeWitt

Pace Gallery, 510 W25th St., NYC

Early in Sol LeWitt’s career, the cube became the basic module for his artistic inquiry—“the grammatical device”—from which his work developed. LeWitt used the cube to create structures in a myriad of variations, usually in series, over the course of his more than 40-year career. This exhibition brings together seven structures from 1991 as a complete series.

just opened:

Andisheh Avini

Marianne Boesky Gallery, 509 W24th St., NYC

Avini uses the subjective experience of his Iranian heritage as a platform from which to explore more collective notions of memory and the significance of imagery. Sourcing bits and pieces of simple images - the curve of a lock of hair, for instance - Avini reduces them to their essential forms until their origin is diluted and the fluidity of paint is emphasized. In these palimpsestic hybrids, Avini’s overwriting obstructs and complicates the language of the traditional designs, both in a visual and conceptual sense. - thru Feb 15