nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru May 16:“Color Me Badd” curated by Chris Bors NARS Foundation, 201 46th Street, Brooklyn, NY (4th Floor)artists: Amanda Browder, Deborah Brown, Amanda Church, Jennifer Coates, Ketta Ioannidou, Gary Petersen & Nicolas TouronAmanda Browder resuscitates the language of pop art with her fabric wall hangings, using a soft material to create a visual explosion focusing on the interaction of color. Although based on reality, Deborah Brown’s fantastical paintings depict her neighborhood of Bushwick with a glowing palette and gestural brushwork creating a new landscape both surreal and personal. Blending biomorphic abstraction with graphic elements, Amanda Church paints planes of color broken up by curving, anonymous figures as if aliens were discovering our planet or vice versa. With a practice grounded firmly in process, Jennifer Coates’s paintings come together after her surfaces have been attacked and layered with pigment, juxtaposing the ethereal with recognizable patterns. Ketta Ioannidou uses memories from the landscape of her childhood home of Cyprus to create spiraling vegetation on the verge of chaos, commenting on its politically unstable history while reveling in the act of painting. Painter Gary Petersen creates hard-edged abstractions with the eye of a designer using a candy-store palette and crisscrossed lines, forming a dense network of colors. The detailed porcelain and mixed media sculptures of Nicolas Touron transport and energize; an imaginary landscape masked as object.

thru May 16:

Color Me Badd
 curated by Chris Bors
 
NARS Foundation, 201 46th Street, Brooklyn, NY (4th Floor)

artists: Amanda Browder, Deborah Brown, Amanda Church,
Jennifer Coates, Ketta Ioannidou, Gary Petersen & Nicolas Touron

Amanda Browder resuscitates the language of pop art with her fabric wall hangings, using a soft material to create a visual explosion focusing on the interaction of color. Although based on reality, Deborah Brown’s fantastical paintings depict her neighborhood of Bushwick with a glowing palette and gestural brushwork creating a new landscape both surreal and personal. Blending biomorphic abstraction with graphic elements, Amanda Church paints planes of color broken up by curving, anonymous figures as if aliens were discovering our planet or vice versa. With a practice grounded firmly in process, Jennifer Coates’s paintings come together after her surfaces have been attacked and layered with pigment, juxtaposing the ethereal with recognizable patterns. Ketta Ioannidou uses memories from the landscape of her childhood home of Cyprus to create spiraling vegetation on the verge of chaos, commenting on its politically unstable history while reveling in the act of painting. Painter Gary Petersen creates hard-edged abstractions with the eye of a designer using a candy-store palette and crisscrossed lines, forming a dense network of colors. The detailed porcelain and mixed media sculptures of Nicolas Touron transport and energize; an imaginary landscape masked as object.

Opens April 11:

Submerged Motherlands
 Swoon
 
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYC

Brooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago.

photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq

Opens Apr 18, 6-9p:“Nude Dudes” René Smith Storefront Ten Eyck Gallery, 324 Ten Eyck St., Brooklyn, NYCRené Smith’s paintings, Nude Dudes, are complicated and radical. Forty years after Playgirl popularized the idea that women could enjoy the male nude, we do not expect to see penises. These are feminist paintings. The subject is important, privileged by its relative absence from our visual culture.  Smith’s work is a sincere ode to longing and the beauty of men’s bodies, but it also addresses the imbalance between the ubiquitous depiction of women’s bare bodies and the dearth of male nakedness.  The paintings depict men’s bodies through a woman’s eyes. The man’s body is presented as a landscape with hills and valleys to roam.  The work also abounds in art historical references, our relationship to photography and formal and painterly ideas about the physical and sensual quality of the pieces themselves.  Friends and professional models posed for Smith’s camera in her studio. She works from these photographs to create her large-scale paintings.

Opens Apr 18, 6-9p:

Nude Dudes
 René Smith
 
Storefront Ten Eyck Gallery, 324 Ten Eyck St., Brooklyn, NYC

René Smith’s paintings, Nude Dudes, are complicated and radical. Forty years after Playgirl popularized the idea that women could enjoy the male nude, we do not expect to see penises. These are feminist paintings. The subject is important, privileged by its relative absence from our visual culture.  Smith’s work is a sincere ode to longing and the beauty of men’s bodies, but it also addresses the imbalance between the ubiquitous depiction of women’s bare bodies and the dearth of male nakedness.  The paintings depict men’s bodies through a woman’s eyes. The man’s body is presented as a landscape with hills and valleys to roam.  The work also abounds in art historical references, our relationship to photography and formal and painterly ideas about the physical and sensual quality of the pieces themselves.  Friends and professional models posed for Smith’s camera in her studio. She works from these photographs to create her large-scale paintings.

continues thru Mar 30:“Still.Life” Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,  Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop YoonOUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYCThe most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

continues thru Mar 30:

Still.Life
 Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,
 Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop Yoon

OUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYC


The most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

opens Fri, Feb 21, 7-10p:“Sump Pumped Sentiments” Todd Bienvenu, Gideon Bok, Shara Hughes, Jason Mones curated by Matt Phillips Tiger Strikes Asteroid, 44 Stewart Ave. #49, Brooklyn, NYC [Google Map]Van Gogh sought to stretch painting’s frame with The Potato Eaters. Essentially, he wanted to invite some different people over for dinner. The conversation in art has continued to broaden in the 125 years or so since that piece was made. Sump Pumped Sentiments gathers a few works by four contemporary artists that are in loose conversation with Van Gogh’s painting and his desire to portray a gritty yet entirely holy gathering. Using the supper as a standard, the pieces presented in this show examine painting’s constant transformation and inevitable mutation.

opens Fri, Feb 21, 7-10p:

Sump Pumped Sentiments
 Todd Bienvenu, Gideon Bok, Shara Hughes, Jason Mones
 curated by Matt Phillips
 
Tiger Strikes Asteroid, 44 Stewart Ave. #49, Brooklyn, NYC [Google Map]

Van Gogh sought to stretch painting’s frame with The Potato Eaters. Essentially, he wanted to invite some different people over for dinner. The conversation in art has continued to broaden in the 125 years or so since that piece was made. Sump Pumped Sentiments gathers a few works by four contemporary artists that are in loose conversation with Van Gogh’s painting and his desire to portray a gritty yet entirely holy gathering. Using the supper as a standard, the pieces presented in this show examine painting’s constant transformation and inevitable mutation.

Recommended, opens Feb 14 (7-9p):

IDIOM II
 Justin Amrhein, Beth Campbell, Jonathan Herder
 Mark Lombardi, William Powhida, Ward Shelley
 
Pierogi Gallery, 177 North 9th St., Brooklyn, NYC [Google Map]

Each of the artists in the exhibition incorporates a vernacular that depicts as well as translates information thereby developing a linear narrative. Mark Lombardi, perhaps the most well known, referred to his information based work as “narrative structures.” His concise body of work — dated from 1996 through 2000 – was developed around events that were international in scope and based on connections of power, politics, and the transfer of money. Ward Shelly employs a similar chart-like visual format but develops his own unique, almost cardiovascular connectivity. He creates historical as well as personal diagrammatic information systems, from his Fluxus Diagram, Addendum to Alfred Barr, People of the Book, to Frank Zappa. William Powhida is known, among other things, for exposing underlying facets of the art world that he’s so closely associated with. Recently he has expanded his work into the fields of sculpture and painting by creating unique variations on some of the dominant trends in contemporary art, albeit with an acute sense of irony. Beth Campbell has worked in multiple mediums for much of her career, from full-scale mirror-image room installations, and distorted inexplicable objects, to her flow chart drawings based on multiple, potential personal futures. Jonathan Herder’s intricate collages utilize the elegant detail of everyday postage stamps with a wit and pathos unique to him. Herder’s carefully composed images are infused with seemingly illogical associations that only become more endearing and plausible with more attention. Justin Amrhein develops information-based works utilizing a schematic format.

recently opened:“FUTURE/PAST” Sam Burford, Don Edler, Daniela Kostova, Don Porcella, Larissa Sansour, Josh Slater REVERSE, 28 Frost St., Brooklyn, NYCcurated by Ginger Shulick. presents both dystopian and utopian scenarios of the past, present and future, featuring artists for whom science fiction and time travel is a prevalent theme in their work. Many of the artists in the exhibition approach the future with both a fear and enthusiasm for its technological developments, while simultaneously retaining nostalgia for the past. Several of the artists’ works directly related to science fiction as depicted in literary works and film, at times referencing existing productions or historical events in their pieces. Future/Past is both a sentimental statement on science fiction, as well as a critical comment on politics and the science fiction genre as a whole. - thru Mar 16pictured: Sam Burford, Star Wars Relief, timelapse photograph of Star Wars IV transformed into a surface relief

recently opened:

FUTURE/PAST
 Sam Burford, Don Edler, Daniela Kostova,
 Don Porcella, Larissa Sansour, Josh Slater
 
REVERSE, 28 Frost St., Brooklyn, NYC

curated by Ginger Shulick. presents both dystopian and utopian scenarios of the past, present and future, featuring artists for whom science fiction and time travel is a prevalent theme in their work. Many of the artists in the exhibition approach the future with both a fear and enthusiasm for its technological developments, while simultaneously retaining nostalgia for the past. Several of the artists’ works directly related to science fiction as depicted in literary works and film, at times referencing existing productions or historical events in their pieces. Future/Past is both a sentimental statement on science fiction, as well as a critical comment on politics and the science fiction genre as a whole. - thru Mar 16

pictured: Sam Burford, Star Wars Relief,
timelapse photograph of Star Wars IV transformed into a surface relief

ongoing:

Little Yāna

various locations, NYC

we’ve enjoyed encountering quite a few of these around town lately, and this appears to be the artist’s Tumblr:

littleyanastreetart.tumblr.com

opens tomorrow, Jan 24, 6-9p:“Accumulations: Drawings & Notebooks” Owen Schuh Schema Projects, 92 St Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn, NY“My work seeks to illuminate the entwining relations between embodied mind, mathematics, and the physical world. My artwork is structured by mathematical functions, which though relatively simple in nature yield outcomes of surprising organic complexity. I have created this work by hand using, at most, the aid of a pocket calculator.” - Owen Schuh

opens tomorrow, Jan 24, 6-9p:

Accumulations: Drawings & Notebooks
 Owen Schuh
 
Schema Projects, 92 St Nicholas Ave., Brooklyn, NY

“My work seeks to illuminate the entwining relations between embodied mind, mathematics, and the physical world. My artwork is structured by mathematical functions, which though relatively simple in nature yield outcomes of surprising organic complexity. I have created this work by hand using, at most, the aid of a pocket calculator.” - Owen Schuh

thru Feb 16:

PULP
 Anastasia Zielinski, Clive Murphy, Michael Leavitt
 
Lorimoto Gallery, 16-23 Hancock St., Brooklyn, NYC
Hours: Saturday & Sunday 1- 6pm [MAP]

exhibition of work by 3 artist working with various types of paper.