nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

opens tomorrow, Jan 12, 4-6p:“Audio Works: ’70s-’80s / Objects (a Simon and a few alarm clocks)” Christopher KnowlesAudio Visual Arts (AVA) Gallery, 31 E. 1st St., NYCa selection of archived audio works and objects (a Simon and a few alarm clocks) from the personal collection of Christopher Knowles. Born in New York City, Knowles has been exhibiting his artwork and participating in readings and performances incorporating his poetry since his teens in the early ’70s. He is perhaps best-known for his text-based “typings,” in which he organizes texts, ranging from lists of top-10 pop songs to single words, into intricate red, black, or green patterns using an electric typewriter. Knowles has also created a significant amount of tape recordings consisting of rhythmically, mathematically, and visually organized poems, often involving repeated variations on a word or phrase.

opens tomorrow, Jan 12, 4-6p:

Audio Works: ’70s-’80s / Objects (a Simon and a few alarm clocks)”
 Christopher Knowles

Audio Visual Arts (AVA) Gallery, 31 E. 1st St., NYC

a selection of archived audio works and objects (a Simon and a few alarm clocks) from the personal collection of Christopher Knowles. Born in New York City, Knowles has been exhibiting his artwork and participating in readings and performances incorporating his poetry since his teens in the early ’70s. He is perhaps best-known for his text-based “typings,” in which he organizes texts, ranging from lists of top-10 pop songs to single words, into intricate red, black, or green patterns using an electric typewriter. Knowles has also created a significant amount of tape recordings consisting of rhythmically, mathematically, and visually organized poems, often involving repeated variations on a word or phrase.

thru Dec 23:

Silent Weapons for Quiet Wars
 Derrick Cruz, Jeremy Dyer and Luke Kranker

Munch Gallery, 245 Broome St., NYC (at Ludlow)

Titled after the 1979 manifesto calling for control of the masses through social engineering, the exhibition illustrates each artist’s preoccupation with the didactic as a counterbalance to the use of mythopoeia in commercial and political messaging. In contrast, their work takes shape as minimal plastic objects, stark black and white prints and droning audio all produced from a diversity of new and traditional media.

thru June 7:

Aeromural
 Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter

The Clocktower Gallery, 108 Leonard St., NYC (13th Floor)

Japanese born artist Oyama Enrico Isamu Letter is in the midst of an expansive residency at The Clocktower Gallery in TriBeCa. The first half of the residency has involved the creation of a mural (in his signature “Quick Turn Structure” style) inside of the residency studio with microphones recording the sounds of the aerosol sprays. Theses audio files will be used for the second half of the residency. After the room is painted white again and restored to its original condition it will be turned into a sound installation piece. Many small speakers will reproduce the previously recorded sounds of the painting process and therefore serve as a reminder of the mural that has been created producing these sounds but is already long gone.

Performance Tonight, 8-10p: embryoroom and Slow Knightsenvoy enterprises, 87 Rivington St., NYC (bt Orchard & Ludlow)Transforming envoy’s basement into a black-box mise-en-scene activated with the haunting scenographic stylings of Gruen and the metronomic flash of Quist’s video projections and soundscapes, this exhibition is the first live presentation of Quist’s feature film The Untitled and an exploration of the collaborative work between the two artists.

Performance Tonight, 8-10p:

embryoroom and Slow Knights

envoy enterprises, 87 Rivington St., NYC (bt Orchard & Ludlow)

Transforming envoy’s basement into a black-box mise-en-scene activated with the haunting scenographic stylings of Gruen and the metronomic flash of Quist’s video projections and soundscapes, this exhibition is the first live presentation of Quist’s feature film The Untitled and an exploration of the collaborative work between the two artists.

Extended thru Feb 10:“The Perfect Stage”Beatrice ScacciaBOSI Contemporary, 48 Orchard St., NYCbosicontemporary.tumblr.comLoosely rendered in wax, pencil and chalk on paper, Scaccia invents characters drawn from contemporary society that exist in ambiguous spaces devoid of context.. These drawings are double-sided, a result of an intricate process of pouring beeswax on the back of the drawing that is then removed with an iron to reveal the luminescent image. “… no one wants to leave center stage. Just … make this soft bed our perfect stage… and I promise I’ll keep jumping, trying hard to get younger, smaller and shorter.”  – Beatrice Scaccia, The Perfect Stage (2012)

Extended thru Feb 10:

The Perfect Stage
Beatrice Scaccia

BOSI Contemporary, 48 Orchard St., NYC
bosicontemporary.tumblr.com

Loosely rendered in wax, pencil and chalk on paper, Scaccia invents characters drawn from contemporary society that exist in ambiguous spaces devoid of context.. These drawings are double-sided, a result of an intricate process of pouring beeswax on the back of the drawing that is then removed with an iron to reveal the luminescent image. “… no one wants to leave center stage. Just … make this soft bed our perfect stage… and I promise I’ll keep jumping, trying hard to get younger, smaller and shorter.”  – Beatrice Scaccia, The Perfect Stage (2012)

(Source: nycartscene)

Closing Soon (Jan 20): “The Perfect Stage” Beatrice ScacciaBOSI Contemporary, 48 Orchard St., NYCbosicontemporary.tumblr.comLoosely rendered in wax, pencil and chalk on paper, Scaccia invents characters drawn from contemporary society that exist in ambiguous spaces devoid of context.. These drawings are double-sided, a result of an intricate process of pouring beeswax on the back of the drawing that is then removed with an iron to reveal the luminescent image. “… no one wants to leave center stage. Just … make this soft bed our perfect stage… and I promise I’ll keep jumping, trying hard to get younger, smaller and shorter.”  – Beatrice Scaccia, The Perfect Stage (2012)

Closing Soon (Jan 20):

The Perfect Stage
 Beatrice Scaccia

BOSI Contemporary, 48 Orchard St., NYC
bosicontemporary.tumblr.com

Loosely rendered in wax, pencil and chalk on paper, Scaccia invents characters drawn from contemporary society that exist in ambiguous spaces devoid of context.. These drawings are double-sided, a result of an intricate process of pouring beeswax on the back of the drawing that is then removed with an iron to reveal the luminescent image. “… no one wants to leave center stage. Just … make this soft bed our perfect stage… and I promise I’ll keep jumping, trying hard to get younger, smaller and shorter.”  – Beatrice Scaccia, The Perfect Stage (2012)

Opens Today: “The Murder of Crows” Janet Cardiff & George Bures MillerPark Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., NYC (bt 66th & 67th St.)$10/$12 Admission (Free Sat, Aug 4)“Few artists work with sound more inventively and with a cannier sense of theater than [Cardiff and Miller].” – The New York Times The largest sound installation to date by artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, The Murder of Crows is a compelling “sound play” that envelops the audience in an unexpected physical and aural environment. Moving and weaving through ninety-eight speakers mounted within the cavernous Drill Hall, the work narrates a captivating and confounding melodrama, investigating concepts of desire, intimacy, love and loss. The multifaceted soundscape uses a fluttering of voices and sounds, from crashing waves to the hubbub of a factory floor, to transport the listener to an unexpected dream-like world. - thru Sept 9

Opens Today:

The Murder of Crows
 Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller

Park Avenue Armory
, 643 Park Ave., NYC (bt 66th & 67th St.)
$10/$12 Admission (Free Sat, Aug 4)

“Few artists work with sound more inventively and with a cannier sense of theater than [Cardiff and Miller].” – The New York Times

The largest sound installation to date by artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, The Murder of Crows is a compelling “sound play” that envelops the audience in an unexpected physical and aural environment. Moving and weaving through ninety-eight speakers mounted within the cavernous Drill Hall, the work narrates a captivating and confounding melodrama, investigating concepts of desire, intimacy, love and loss. The multifaceted soundscape uses a fluttering of voices and sounds, from crashing waves to the hubbub of a factory floor, to transport the listener to an unexpected dream-like world. - thru Sept 9

thru Sept 10: “Just Knocked Out” Lara FavarettoMoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave., Long Island City, NYSubway E,G,M,7 (intersection of 46th Ave)first survey of Lara Favaretto (b. Treviso, 1973), comprising a dozen works from the past fifteen years, as well as new pieces created specifically for the exhibition. Favaretto’s installations and audio, sculptural, and kinetic works balance between failure and aspiration. A sense of resignation to the forces of decay and obsolescence runs throughout her work—most visibly in her minimal cubes made of confetti, which decompose during the period of their display. - thru July 29

thru Sept 10:

Just Knocked Out
 Lara Favaretto

MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave., Long Island City, NY
Subway E,G,M,7 (intersection of 46th Ave)

first survey of Lara Favaretto (b. Treviso, 1973), comprising a dozen works from the past fifteen years, as well as new pieces created specifically for the exhibition. Favaretto’s installations and audio, sculptural, and kinetic works balance between failure and aspiration. A sense of resignation to the forces of decay and obsolescence runs throughout her work—most visibly in her minimal cubes made of confetti, which decompose during the period of their display. - thru July 29

Performance Tonight, June 27, 7p: “Perceptual” Richard GaretResidency Unlimited, 360 Court St., Brooklyn, NYsubway F/G Carroll Street (President Street exit)an audiovisual performance by New York based artist Richard Garet. Comprised of moving image and sound, the work examines the processes of luminosity, color, movement, and light phenomena. The sound, carefully constructed and utilized to effect, intervenes, disrupts, and modifies the visual parameters of the projected images. The techniques employed to make the imagery incorporate real-time computer processing and visual-constructs established from the permutations and the brilliancy generated by the media itself. Curated by Asher Remy-Toledo. Free Admission.

Performance Tonight, June 27, 7p:

Perceptual
 Richard Garet

Residency Unlimited, 360 Court St., Brooklyn, NY
subway F/G Carroll Street (President Street exit)

an audiovisual performance by New York based artist Richard Garet. Comprised of moving image and sound, the work examines the processes of luminosity, color, movement, and light phenomena. The sound, carefully constructed and utilized to effect, intervenes, disrupts, and modifies the visual parameters of the projected images. The techniques employed to make the imagery incorporate real-time computer processing and visual-constructs established from the permutations and the brilliancy generated by the media itself. Curated by Asher Remy-Toledo. Free Admission.

Opens Tonight, May 31, 6-8p: Guy Goldstein: “Bells & Whistles”Erin Dunn: “Rapture’s Adagio" Rooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYCThe term Jaro is a double reference to “year” in Esperanto and “caravan” in the Kichagga language. Time and displacement are integral to the concept of artists-in-residency. The artists in these two solo shows are in residency with Residency Unlimited. On the ground level, Bells & Whistles by Guy Goldstein features a new sound piece alongside works on paper. Goldstein’s investigates how to create meaning in a saturated consumer driven society. In the lower level of the gallery, Rapture’s Adagio by Erin Dunn presents a complex installation of painting, sculpture and a stop motion animation that synthesizes techniques and materials employed with self-produced digital recordings. -thru July 8

Opens Tonight, May 31, 6-8p:

Guy Goldstein: Bells & Whistles
Erin Dunn: Rapture’s Adagio"

Rooster Gallery, 190 Orchard St., NYC

The term Jaro is a double reference to “year” in Esperanto and “caravan” in the
Kichagga language. Time and displacement are integral to the concept of artists-in-residency. The artists in these two solo shows are in residency with Residency Unlimited. On the ground level, Bells & Whistles by Guy Goldstein features a new sound piece alongside works on paper. Goldstein’s investigates how to create meaning in a saturated consumer driven society. In the lower level of the gallery, Rapture’s Adagio by Erin Dunn presents a complex installation of painting, sculpture and a stop motion animation that synthesizes techniques and materials employed with self-produced digital recordings. -thru July 8