nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

opens tomorrow, June 19, 6-8p:“Begotten, Not Made” Nicola Samori Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYCMore than a trick of the eye, Samori’s paintings treat their surface as a material skin transcribing the memory of their process. “Like the eye adjusting to darkness, adaptation is necessary upon entering Samori’s visual cosmos. The images stare at us in an effort of denied vision. With the icy gaze of a femme fatale warning us that she is beyond our reach, they block our penetration. The images feel us, smell us, judge us. They are watching, but they don’t see. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. And we see through a glass, darkly. Sometimes peering in, other times peeling back in search of the surface beneath the surface beneath the surface.”

opens tomorrow, June 19, 6-8p:

Begotten, Not Made
 Nicola Samori
 
Ana Cristea Gallery, 521 W26th St., NYC

More than a trick of the eye, Samori’s paintings treat their surface as a material skin transcribing the memory of their process. “Like the eye adjusting to darkness, adaptation is necessary upon entering Samori’s visual cosmos. The images stare at us in an effort of denied vision. With the icy gaze of a femme fatale warning us that she is beyond our reach, they block our penetration. The images feel us, smell us, judge us. They are watching, but they don’t see. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. And we see through a glass, darkly. Sometimes peering in, other times peeling back in search of the surface beneath the surface beneath the surface.”

opens tonight, Wed, June 18, 6-8p:

Leaps into the Void: Shamanism, Meditation, Transcendence, Oblivion”
 Gwyn Joy, Sky Kim, Michael Maxwell,
 Joe Nanashe, Phoebe Rathmell
 
Garis & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYC

a group exhibition united by the philosophical underpinnings and practical objectives of each artist’s own practice in addressing concepts related to meditation and altered mental states, physical and mental transcendence and Eastern and Western belief systems related to cycles of life.

online exhibit:“Talk is Cheap: A Street Poster Exhibition, 1984” gallery.98bowery.comIn the 1970s and 80s much of downtown New York lay in decay but amidst the economic squalor a surprising art renaissance emerged along the district’s streets and walls.  Most people remember the graffiti from that period but of equal interest was the profusion of street posters. Talk is Cheap, a short-lived 1984 street poster exhibition comprising 27 collaborative posters by 47 artists is a unique manifestation of this epoch.  The project done under the auspices of the artist group Collaborative Projects Inc (COLAB). The fact that it was a street exhibition inspired some artists like John Hogan, Kiki Smith, Jane Dickson, Charlie Ahearn, Christy Rupp, Lauren Sunstein, Christof Kohlhofer and Dan Asher to make posters directly connected to the politics of the day.   Others like Alan Moore, Seton Smith, Olivia Beens, John Morton, Andrea Callard, Jolie Stahl, Mitch Corber, Bobby G, Joseph Nechvatal, Rhys Chatham, Bradley Eros, Aline Mare, and Janet Stein created works that largely conformed to their customary art concerns.pictured: Olivia Beens / Claire Seidl, Mammoth Cave, 1984

online exhibit:

Talk is Cheap: A Street Poster Exhibition, 1984
 
gallery.98bowery.com

In the 1970s and 80s much of downtown New York lay in decay but amidst the economic squalor a surprising art renaissance emerged along the district’s streets and walls.  Most people remember the graffiti from that period but of equal interest was the profusion of street posters. Talk is Cheap, a short-lived 1984 street poster exhibition comprising 27 collaborative posters by 47 artists is a unique manifestation of this epoch.  The project done under the auspices of the artist group Collaborative Projects Inc (COLAB). The fact that it was a street exhibition inspired some artists like John Hogan, Kiki Smith, Jane Dickson, Charlie Ahearn, Christy Rupp, Lauren Sunstein, Christof Kohlhofer and Dan Asher to make posters directly connected to the politics of the day.   Others like Alan Moore, Seton Smith, Olivia Beens, John Morton, Andrea Callard, Jolie Stahl, Mitch Corber, Bobby G, Joseph Nechvatal, Rhys Chatham, Bradley Eros, Aline Mare, and Janet Stein created works that largely conformed to their customary art concerns.

pictured: Olivia Beens / Claire Seidl, Mammoth Cave, 1984

closes soon (June 15):

Lebbeus Woods, Architect
 
The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC

The exhibition brings together works from the past forty years by architect Lebbeus Woods, centering on transformation as a recurring theme and providing a framework for understanding the experimental nature of his work. Acknowledging the parallels between society’s physical and psychological constructions, Woods has depicted a career-long narrative of how these constructions transform our being. Working mostly, but not exclusively, with pencil on paper, Woods has created an oeuvre of complex worlds—at times abstract and at times explicit—that present shifts, cycles, repetitions within the built environment. His timeless architecture is not in a particular style or in response to a singular moment in the field; rather, it offers an opportunity to consider how built forms impact the individual and the collective, and reflect contemporary political, social and ideological conditions, and how one person contributes to the development and mutation of the built world.

recommended, recently opened:

Supports/Surfaces
 André-Pierre Arnal, Pierre Buraglio, Louis Cane,
 Mark Devade, Daniel Dezeuze, Noël Dolla, Jean-Michel Meurice,
 Bernard Pagés, Jean-Pierre Pincemin, Patrick Saytour, Claude Viallat.

Canada Gallery, 333 Broome St., NYC

the first comprehensive exhibition in the United States of this under-recognized French art movement. Supports/Surfaces was a loose confederation of about 15 artists mostly from the south of France (Nimes, St. Etienne, Nice, Etc.) who made work marked by an interest in materiality, expansive ideas of what a painting could be and often a lyrical use of bright color. There is no manifesto, but the writings and ideas of Freud, Marx, Clement Greenberg, Michael Fried and Chairman Mao were tossed together along with a deep interest in Matisse, another artist associated with the south of France. Everyday items used as art materials were as radical then as they are commonplace now. Witness the dishrags of Dola, the painted sunshade umbrellas of Viallat, the lathe constructions of Dezeuze or Saytour’s bolt of raw fabric in the seminal piece “Deployed”. Supports/Surfaces artists may or may not have been the first to pick up such materials, but what they did with them formally is the key to what sets the group apart from say Arte Povera in Italy or the more famous French group BMPT. In their hands there was a coupling of base material, the format of painting and the poetics of unprogrammatic form and color that simultaneously questioned and reaffirmed painting. Presented with Galerie Bernard Ceysson. thru July 20

read Sharon Butler’s comprehensive review & essay at Two Coats

pictured:
Pierre Buraglio, Montage, 1981, Mixed media on canvas
Mark Devade, Untitled, 1967, Ink on canvas

opens Sat, June 14, 6-9p:“This is what sculpture looks like” Rachel Beach, Caitlin Cherry, Monica Cook,  Diana Cooper, Molly Crabapple, Daria Irincheeva,  Natalie Jeremijenko, Saeri Kiritani, Joanna Malinowska,  Michelle Matson, Rachel Mason, Esperanza Mayobre,  Brenna Murphy, Kate Ostler, Shinique Smith, Katie Torn Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYC“There are too many painting shows. There aren’t enough sculpture shows. We are fixing that.”

opens Sat, June 14, 6-9p:

This is what sculpture looks like
 Rachel Beach, Caitlin Cherry, Monica Cook,
 Diana Cooper, Molly Crabapple, Daria Irincheeva,
 Natalie Jeremijenko, Saeri Kiritani, Joanna Malinowska,
 Michelle Matson, Rachel Mason, Esperanza Mayobre,
 Brenna Murphy, Kate Ostler, Shinique Smith, Katie Torn
 
Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYC

“There are too many painting shows. There aren’t enough sculpture shows. We are fixing that.”

opens tonight, June 5, 7-9p:

MATING SEASON
 curated by Keith Schweitzer & Jason Patrick Voegele
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC (bt Delancey & Broome)

a group exhibition celebrating “the season of fertility” through works by Liza Béar, Sarah Bereza, George Boorujy, Tiffany Bozic, Maxi Cohen, Anita Cruz-Eberhard, Brian Adam Douglas, Juan Fontanive, Monique Mantell, Ryan McLennan, Sirikul Pattachote, Lina Puerta, Herb Smith, Leif Solem, Frank Webster

thru July 29:“Me, My Mother, My Father, and I” Ragnar Kjartansson New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYCthe first New York museum exhibition of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson presents works with and about his family, including a newly orchestrated performance and video piece entitled Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage (2011/2014), in which ten musicians play a live composition for the duration of the exhibition. This work takes inspiration from a scene in Iceland’s first feature film, Morðsaga (1977), directed by Reynir Oddsson, in which the main character of the film, played by Kjartansson’s mother, Guðrún Ásmundsdóttir, fantasizes about a plumber, played by Kjartansson’s father, Kjartan Ragnarsson, in a sex scene on the kitchen floor. As family legend has it, Kjartansson was conceived the night after the film shoot. Kjartan Sveinsson, composer and a former member of the Icelandic band Sigur Rós, transformed the scene’s dialogue into a ten-part polyphony played by ten musicians, who sing and play guitar in the tradition of the troubadour to accompany a projection of the original film scene. (photo: Benoit Pailley)

thru July 29:

Me, My Mother, My Father, and I
 Ragnar Kjartansson
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

the first New York museum exhibition of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson presents works with and about his family, including a newly orchestrated performance and video piece entitled Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage (2011/2014), in which ten musicians play a live composition for the duration of the exhibition. This work takes inspiration from a scene in Iceland’s first feature film, Morðsaga (1977), directed by Reynir Oddsson, in which the main character of the film, played by Kjartansson’s mother, Guðrún Ásmundsdóttir, fantasizes about a plumber, played by Kjartansson’s father, Kjartan Ragnarsson, in a sex scene on the kitchen floor. As family legend has it, Kjartansson was conceived the night after the film shoot. Kjartan Sveinsson, composer and a former member of the Icelandic band Sigur Rós, transformed the scene’s dialogue into a ten-part polyphony played by ten musicians, who sing and play guitar in the tradition of the troubadour to accompany a projection of the original film scene. (photo: Benoit Pailley)

opens tomorrow, June 5, 6-8p:

paintingassupermodel
 Franklin Evans
 
Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe Gallery, 525 W22nd St., NYC

Evans presents a new installation comprised of wall painting/collages, eight large paintings, 1,500 square feet of digital prints on paper/canvas/silk, photographic sculptures, floor works, and sculpture vitrines that alter the architecture of the gallery.

begins tonight, runs all weekend:BUSHWICK OPEN STUDIOS 2014Now in its eighth year, Bushwick Open Studios (BOS) is a free three-day arts and culture festival celebrating the neighborhood’s vibrant community and local art scene. Open studios hours vary per artist, so check the directory for precise times. Most studios are open 12pm - 7pm on Saturday, May 31st and Sunday, June 1st. BOS is New York’s largest open studios event, encouraging hundreds of artists to open their doors and share their work. Additionally, visitors can enjoy a series of events, performances, and panels, coordinated by Arts in Bushwick (AiB).

DIRECTORY —> artsinbushwick.org/bos2014/directory

begins tonight, runs all weekend:

BUSHWICK OPEN STUDIOS 2014

Now in its eighth year, Bushwick Open Studios (BOS) is a free three-day arts and culture festival celebrating the neighborhood’s vibrant community and local art scene. Open studios hours vary per artist, so check the directory for precise times. Most studios are open 12pm - 7pm on Saturday, May 31st and Sunday, June 1st. BOS is New York’s largest open studios event, encouraging hundreds of artists to open their doors and share their work. Additionally, visitors can enjoy a series of events, performances, and panels, coordinated by Arts in Bushwick (AiB).

DIRECTORY —> artsinbushwick.org/bos2014/directory