nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens Thurs, Oct 16, 6-8p:“Likelihood of Confusion” Alfred Steiner Joshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St, NYCfeaturing twelve works of watercolor on paper, two oil on medium-density fiberboard, as well as a new piece from Steiner’s “Anti-Paparazzi” series, Steiner reflects on the pervasive nature of media and advertising. Extending his project of reconstructing pre-existing graphic forms from carefully rendered naturalistic images, Steiner tackles trademarks, service marks, logos, and other indicia of origin. To do this, Steiner considers the idiosyncratic contours comprising these marks and, using techniques of free association, replaces each contour with a similarly shaped image. The show’s title, Likelihood of Confusion, takes its name from the legal standard for determining trademark infringement. - thru Nov 15

Opens Thurs, Oct 16, 6-8p:

Likelihood of Confusion
 Alfred Steiner
 
Joshua Liner Gallery, 540 W28th St, NYC

featuring twelve works of watercolor on paper, two oil on medium-density fiberboard, as well as a new piece from Steiner’s “Anti-Paparazzi” series, Steiner reflects on the pervasive nature of media and advertising. Extending his project of reconstructing pre-existing graphic forms from carefully rendered naturalistic images, Steiner tackles trademarks, service marks, logos, and other indicia of origin. To do this, Steiner considers the idiosyncratic contours comprising these marks and, using techniques of free association, replaces each contour with a similarly shaped image. The show’s title, Likelihood of Confusion, takes its name from the legal standard for determining trademark infringement. - thru Nov 15

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:“Figure Studies” Walter RobinsonLynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYCKnown for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:

Figure Studies
 Walter Robinson

Lynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYC

Known for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

just opened:

On Location
 James Rieck

Lyons Wier Gallery, 542 W24th St., NYC

The paintings in “On Location” are compositions painted from digitally composited studies of figures in grandiose landscapes. The figures are models poached from advertisements and the landscapes are classic displays of manufactured nature.. Rieck has always sifted source material from commercial advertising catalogs, but for first time, Rieck has deviated away from exclusively using commercial catalogs by introducing imagery from manufactured studio locations. - thru Apr 27

Opens June 14, 6-8p:

Phantom Hand
 Erik Schoonebeek

Jeff Bailey Gallery, 625 W27th St., NYC

Schoonebeek’s first solo exhibition in New York, featuring paintings and drawings made on found paper, old book covers and other materials. Schoonebeek is influenced by contemporary advertising images, especially those seen while driving: road signs, billboards, commercial graphics, logos and posters. Although these images and graphic symbols are designed to communicate in some way, for Schoonebeek they become enmeshed with one another and change, as he says, “into autonomous images that confront you with a blank stare”. From this source material, Schoonebeek forms his own imagery that hovers between recognizable graphic cues and amorphous narrative. - thru July 13