nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru Jan 26:“Analogue Future” Russell Tyler DCKT Contemporary, 21 Orchard St., NYCInfluenced by the crude digital landscapes of outdated 8-bit graphics and the utopian visions of 1960s and 1970s science fiction films, Tyler’s heavily impastoed oil paintings are the legacy of unmet hopes and promised ideals.

thru Jan 26:

Analogue Future
 Russell Tyler
 
DCKT Contemporary, 21 Orchard St., NYC

Influenced by the crude digital landscapes of outdated 8-bit graphics and the utopian visions of 1960s and 1970s science fiction films, Tyler’s heavily impastoed oil paintings are the legacy of unmet hopes and promised ideals.

opens tonight, Jan 11, 6-8p:

Stairs and Ramps
 Todd Chilton

Feature Inc Gallery, 131 Allen St., NYC

Todd Chilton’s relatively small and intensely colored abstract oil paintings layer patterns that are bounded by the edge of the canvas, leading you to believe these paintings are easily graspable. The exhibition title, Stairs and Ramps, references the flat and manipulated space of computer games and, as well, ways to move by foot or wheelchair through architectural space. At the same time, it is also just two ways to graphically read a triangle, the shape that is the basis of the patterns in most of these paintings. Titles of the paintings point to alternate readings of what may be initially perceived. Geometry is undermined by handedness.

opens Jan 11, 6-9p:“Heand” Heather Guertin INTERSTATE, 66 Knickerbocker Ave., Brooklyn, NYCHeather Guertin’s first solo exhibition in New York. “The first thing you see is the color. The palates are specific and varied but share a quality of light. There are hues that compliment, dissolve, heighten and erase. There are shapes, squares, swirls, and areas of fade that remind you of a room or a field or a curtain, someplace indistinct yet familiar somehow. Then there are these people. These faces in profile, some with eyes, most blank, some in three quarter turn… These figures in these colorscapes are not built into the paintings. They do not inhabit the space that surrounds them. Instead, they are carved out from the paint with a knife-like swiftness. These faces, bodies, and hands make you think of stories. They make you imagine that the colors, the opacity and lightness of the surface are more then just pigment. Each brush stroke becomes something. Each color means something. They create traces and these traces lead you to a story. The story is loose, it is yours” - Jamie Sterns

opens Jan 11, 6-9p:

Heand
 Heather Guertin
 

INTERSTATE, 66 Knickerbocker Ave., Brooklyn, NYC

Heather Guertin’s first solo exhibition in New York. “The first thing you see is the color. The palates are specific and varied but share a quality of light. There are hues that compliment, dissolve, heighten and erase. There are shapes, squares, swirls, and areas of fade that remind you of a room or a field or a curtain, someplace indistinct yet familiar somehow. Then there are these people. These faces in profile, some with eyes, most blank, some in three quarter turn… These figures in these colorscapes are not built into the paintings. They do not inhabit the space that surrounds them. Instead, they are carved out from the paint with a knife-like swiftness. These faces, bodies, and hands make you think of stories. They make you imagine that the colors, the opacity and lightness of the surface are more then just pigment. Each brush stroke becomes something. Each color means something. They create traces and these traces lead you to a story. The story is loose, it is yours” - Jamie Sterns

continues thru Jan 26:“DU” Anke WeyerCANADA Gallery, 333 Broome St., NYCan exhibition of human scale canvases, each piece a flayed mass of colorful forms. Compulsively drawing with a brush, rapidly filling tablets of paper, Weyer flushes out images from her subconscious and builds an index for her paintings. Swift marks are boldly layered and shapes fall into place, all colliding with teeming energy. With illusions to primitive forms, pop art, handwriting and the human figure mashed into jumbled puddles of color, forms appear and disappear; eyes, monstrous figures, cartoonish limbs, jumbled words, trees, suggestions of landscapes, calligraphic marks and sumptuous lines are carved by Weyer’s brush. “I like to keep the paintings close when making them. Despite their scale, I want to treat them like drawings, like those pieces of paper which allow me unfiltered expression.” - A. Weyer

continues thru Jan 26:

DU
 Anke Weyer

CANADA Gallery, 333 Broome St., NYC

an exhibition of human scale canvases, each piece a flayed mass of colorful forms. Compulsively drawing with a brush, rapidly filling tablets of paper, Weyer flushes out images from her subconscious and builds an index for her paintings. Swift marks are boldly layered and shapes fall into place, all colliding with teeming energy. With illusions to primitive forms, pop art, handwriting and the human figure mashed into jumbled puddles of color, forms appear and disappear; eyes, monstrous figures, cartoonish limbs, jumbled words, trees, suggestions of landscapes, calligraphic marks and sumptuous lines are carved by Weyer’s brush. “I like to keep the paintings close when making them. Despite their scale, I want to treat them like drawings, like those pieces of paper which allow me unfiltered expression.” - A. Weyer

thru Jan 4:“Richard Van Buren: The 1970s”Garth Greenan Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (10th fl)the exhibition is the first ever large-scale presentation of Van Buren’s work from this period. Fifteen of the artist’s densely layered abstract sculptures are on view, providing a survey of the artist’s work during the 1970s — polyester biomorphs impregnated with materials as seemingly disparate as rock salt, cadmium, and wallpaper paste.“Van Buren’s understanding of time is what sets him apart from his peers. His works are not about the timeless present (Judd and Dan Flavin) or the body (Eva Hesse), nor do they reference art history — Jackson Pollock’s poured paintings, for example. Rather, they acknowledge that time shapes us into forms that we may be unable to recognize, which, if you think about it, is a rather disquieting perception of infinity. Add to this Van Buren’s embrace of disparate, seemingly incommensurable materials, as well as the processes that he invented, but refused to turn into signature gestures, and one begins to get a sense of the enormity of his achievement.” - John Yau, Hyperallergic

thru Jan 4:

Richard Van Buren: The 1970s

Garth Greenan Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (10th fl)

the exhibition is the first ever large-scale presentation of Van Buren’s work from this period. Fifteen of the artist’s densely layered abstract sculptures are on view, providing a survey of the artist’s work during the 1970s — polyester biomorphs impregnated with materials as seemingly disparate as rock salt, cadmium, and wallpaper paste.

“Van Buren’s understanding of time is what sets him apart from his peers. His works are not about the timeless present (Judd and Dan Flavin) or the body (Eva Hesse), nor do they reference art history — Jackson Pollock’s poured paintings, for example. Rather, they acknowledge that time shapes us into forms that we may be unable to recognize, which, if you think about it, is a rather disquieting perception of infinity. Add to this Van Buren’s embrace of disparate, seemingly incommensurable materials, as well as the processes that he invented, but refused to turn into signature gestures, and one begins to get a sense of the enormity of his achievement.” - John Yau, Hyperallergic

Opens Tonight, Dec 12, 6-8p:“Domenico Zindato: Recent Drawings”Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th st)Zindato’s work has evolved since he presented his first solo exhibition in New York, at the Phyllis Kind Gallery, in 2000. At that time, his drawings were smaller. Large patches of color and his signature, symbol-like motifs figured in those earlier pictures, but they were less densely compacted than they appear today. As his drawing surfaces grew bigger, the images he created on them did not automatically grow larger in scale, too; that is, he enlarged his compositions’ background swaths of solid colors but he continued to render the lines and sizes of his repeated, random-pattern motifs—hands, eyes, snakes, heads, birds and more—as tiny and as meticulously as ever. As a result, seen from a distance, Zindato’s works of recent years read visually as rhythmic plays of abstract, colored forms. Up close, they pull viewers into thickets of finely elaborated patterns, made up of the artist’s tiny motifs, which are set against those dynamic fields of color.  - thru Jan 18

Opens Tonight, Dec 12, 6-8p:

Domenico Zindato: Recent Drawings”

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th st)

Zindato’s work has evolved since he presented his first solo exhibition in New York, at the Phyllis Kind Gallery, in 2000. At that time, his drawings were smaller. Large patches of color and his signature, symbol-like motifs figured in those earlier pictures, but they were less densely compacted than they appear today. As his drawing surfaces grew bigger, the images he created on them did not automatically grow larger in scale, too; that is, he enlarged his compositions’ background swaths of solid colors but he continued to render the lines and sizes of his repeated, random-pattern motifs—hands, eyes, snakes, heads, birds and more—as tiny and as meticulously as ever. As a result, seen from a distance, Zindato’s works of recent years read visually as rhythmic plays of abstract, colored forms. Up close, they pull viewers into thickets of finely elaborated patterns, made up of the artist’s tiny motifs, which are set against those dynamic fields of color.  - thru Jan 18

thru Oct 12:“Secrets” Michael ButheAlexander and Bonin Gallery, 132 Tenth Ave., NYC (18th/19th)“Distinctive enough to capture major attention, but too diverse to be readily branded, the German artist Michael Buthe had a substantial European career in the 1970s and ’80s, but faded from view after his death at 50 in 1994… the main show consists primarily of three large pieces. The 1985 “Landscape (Spanish Energy),” a dense assemblage incorporating a pitchfork, brocade and the image of a staring eye, finds Mr. Buthe in a theatrical mode, while a pair of 15-foot-long abstract triptych paintings recall his minimalist roots.” - Holland Cotter, NY Timespictured: Landschaft (Spanische Energie) 1985

thru Oct 12:

Secrets
 Michael Buthe

Alexander and Bonin Gallery, 132 Tenth Ave., NYC (18th/19th)

“Distinctive enough to capture major attention, but too diverse to be readily branded, the German artist Michael Buthe had a substantial European career in the 1970s and ’80s, but faded from view after his death at 50 in 1994… the main show consists primarily of three large pieces. The 1985 “Landscape (Spanish Energy),” a dense assemblage incorporating a pitchfork, brocade and the image of a staring eye, finds Mr. Buthe in a theatrical mode, while a pair of 15-foot-long abstract triptych paintings recall his minimalist roots.” - Holland Cotter, NY Times


pictured: Landschaft (Spanische Energie) 1985

opens Wed, July 31, 6-9p:“Multiple / Universal” Hans Baumann, Christian Berman, Jon Blank, Palma Blank, Ted Gahl,  Field Kallop, Karl Larocca,  Lyman Richardson, Kristen Schiele, Oliver WardenStorefront Bushwick, 16 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn NY (original location)“Multiple / Universal deals with the role of art and abstraction as a universal engine for self-differentiation and universal communication in the age of the internet. The artists in the show navigate the visual landscape by material experimentation, geometry, and color play in ways that vividly illuminate individual preference and experience.  These works exhibit the connectedness of a universally vibrating network.  The underpinnings of this curatorial effort lie in the basic study of quantum physics. We live in a time where humanity is approaching a confluence between universal electronic consciousness (the internet) and an inchoate but growing understanding of the way that energy and consciousness are drawn from a universal field. How do easy access to information and the shift away from a mechanical view of the universe affect abstraction?” - thru Aug 25

opens Wed, July 31, 6-9p:

Multiple / Universal
 Hans Baumann, Christian Berman,
 Jon Blank, Palma Blank, Ted Gahl,
 Field Kallop, Karl Larocca,
 Lyman Richardson, Kristen Schiele,
 Oliver Warden

Storefront Bushwick, 16 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn NY (original location)

“Multiple / Universal deals with the role of art and abstraction as a universal engine for self-differentiation and universal communication in the age of the internet. The artists in the show navigate the visual landscape by material experimentation, geometry, and color play in ways that vividly illuminate individual preference and experience.  These works exhibit the connectedness of a universally vibrating network.  The underpinnings of this curatorial effort lie in the basic study of quantum physics. We live in a time where humanity is approaching a confluence between universal electronic consciousness (the internet) and an inchoate but growing understanding of the way that energy and consciousness are drawn from a universal field. How do easy access to information and the shift away from a mechanical view of the universe affect abstraction?” - thru Aug 25

Opens Tomorrow, June 13, 6-8p:“Smuggling the Sun” Eamon Ore-GironNicelle Beauchene Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC (bt Bowery & Chrystie)Likening the return to elemental abstraction to the revisiting of acoustic instruments from electronically generated sound, Ore-Giron references ethnomusicology as a conceptual influence. Ore-Giron’s intimately scaled paintings reference a meticulous approach to the handmade, using a combination of raw linen and a palette rooted in tones of red and orange to lend an intrinsically organic feeling to his otherwise minimal compositions. - thru July 12

Opens Tomorrow, June 13, 6-8p:

Smuggling the Sun
 Eamon Ore-Giron

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC (bt Bowery & Chrystie)

Likening the return to elemental abstraction to the revisiting of acoustic instruments from electronically generated sound, Ore-Giron references ethnomusicology as a conceptual influence. Ore-Giron’s intimately scaled paintings reference a meticulous approach to the handmade, using a combination of raw linen and a palette rooted in tones of red and orange to lend an intrinsically organic feeling to his otherwise minimal compositions. - thru July 12

thru June 28:“Floater” Clint Jukkala, Alexander Kroll, Evan Nesbit, Erik Olson, Eric Sall, Amanda ValdezBravinLee programs, 526 W26th St., NYC (#211)the work of six painters, whose abstracted imagery is located between the familiar and peculiar, revealing spatial ambiguities and vague references. Most of the work emerges out of abstraction and plays with its conventions and classifications, much like the “floater” that moves about your field of vision. “Floaters are deposits of various size, shape, and consistency that exist within the eye’s vitreous humor. They may appear as spots, webs, fragments, or threads that float slowly before the observer’s eyes.” pictured:    Erik Olson, 2013, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 inches

thru June 28:

Floater
 Clint Jukkala, Alexander Kroll, Evan Nesbit,
 Erik Olson, Eric Sall, Amanda Valdez

BravinLee programs, 526 W26th St., NYC (#211)

the work of six painters, whose abstracted imagery is located between the familiar and peculiar, revealing spatial ambiguities and vague references. Most of the work emerges out of abstraction and plays with its conventions and classifications, much like the “floater” that moves about your field of vision. “Floaters are deposits of various size, shape, and consistency that exist within the eye’s vitreous humor. They may appear as spots, webs, fragments, or threads that float slowly before the observer’s eyes.”

pictured:    Erik Olson, 2013, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 inches