nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

continues thru Jan 18:“Corpus Americus” curated by Dexter WimberlyDriscoll Babcock Gallery, 525 W25th St., NYCWorking in a range of media including painting, drawing and sculpture, the 10 artists featured in the exhibition present varied manifestations of the human body as a proxy, representing American identity politics and social hierarchies. Artists: Margaret Bowland; Caitlin Cherry; Derek Fordjour; Valerie Hegarty; Doron Langberg; Simone Leigh; Mario Moore; Jenny Morgan; Jennifer Packer; and Nathaniel Mary Quinn

continues thru Jan 18:

Corpus Americus
 curated by Dexter Wimberly

Driscoll Babcock Gallery, 525 W25th St., NYC

Working in a range of media including painting, drawing and sculpture, the 10 artists featured in the exhibition present varied manifestations of the human body as a proxy, representing American identity politics and social hierarchies.

Artists: Margaret Bowland; Caitlin Cherry; Derek Fordjour; Valerie Hegarty; Doron Langberg; Simone Leigh; Mario Moore; Jenny Morgan; Jennifer Packer; and Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Opens Wed, July 11, 6-8p: “Painting is History”Charles Browning, The Chadwicks, David Fertig, Joe Fig, Valerie Hegarty & Steve Mumford.Winkleman Gallery, 621 W27th St., NYC"While the practices of these artists vary greatly, they are united by their interest in the traditional use of painting to record history. For much of art history, painting occupied a central role in the formation of shared memory. The pictures of historical events became the way in which they were remembered and commemorated. During the 18th and 19th Centuries, the academies of Europe placed history painting at the pinnacle of artistic achievement privileging the mode above all others.Of course, this idea no longer holds. Film and digital media are the primary means of recording history, and painting is considered suspect by many observers for the very reason of its former function in this regard. Indeed, to be a contemporary painter is to often reject the past or to forget it altogether—to paint without memory. And yet, there are contemporary artists who are intrigued by possibilities within painting for recording and imagining human affairs. This show presents a small group of artists who explore this possibility.” - curators Jay Grimm & Edward Winkleman

Opens Wed, July 11, 6-8p:

Painting is History
Charles Browning, The Chadwicks, David Fertig, Joe Fig, Valerie Hegarty & Steve Mumford.

Winkleman Gallery, 621 W27th St., NYC

"While the practices of these artists vary greatly, they are united by their interest in the traditional use of painting to record history. For much of art history, painting occupied a central role in the formation of shared memory. The pictures of historical events became the way in which they were remembered and commemorated. During the 18th and 19th Centuries, the academies of Europe placed history painting at the pinnacle of artistic achievement privileging the mode above all others.

Of course, this idea no longer holds. Film and digital media are the primary means of recording history, and painting is considered suspect by many observers for the very reason of its former function in this regard. Indeed, to be a contemporary painter is to often reject the past or to forget it altogether—to paint without memory. And yet, there are contemporary artists who are intrigued by possibilities within painting for recording and imagining human affairs. This show presents a small group of artists who explore this possibility.” - curators Jay Grimm & Edward Winkleman

Opens Tonight, Apr 5, 6-8p:

Altered States
 Valerie Hegarty

Marlborough Chelsea, 545 W25nd St., NYC

Hegarty’s depiction of destruction is a departure point to examine larger issues of erasure, repression, the uncanny, metamorphosis, death and rebirth. Hegarty painstakingly crafts her works from foam core, papier mâché and ink-jet prints on canvas that she then paints, carves, twists, drapes, amputates, and grafts to create mutated originals where the fictional disasters behave as a catalyst for the works coming back to life. - thru May 5