nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

nycARTscene Interview: Tara de la Garza

Arthur Seen recently interviewed artist Tara de la Garza. Her exhibition, Embracing Failure, opens Thursday, August 28th at The Lodge Gallery and runs through August 31st.

1/ Your new show is called Embracing Failure, do you think of yourself as a failure?

I think every artist has an inner critic and it depends on what day as to where you see yourself on the success spectrum. Creating art has been the hardest thing I have ever done. I think most people have this image of an artist in a field with a watercolor palette, happily humming away, creating. In reality, to create something meaningful, that will hopefully forward the dialogue of art, is a struggle. By embracing failure I am open to seeing where an artwork evolves before I discount it. I am revisiting, (uncrumpling!) trashed work and editing, much like a writer or a musician would do. Creating art is a beautiful thing because if allows you time to wander, but that time can also be filled with self doubt. Especially making marks on paper, you can’t hide. You rush in and then backtrack to make it up. It’s the human bloody condition on paper!

2/ The works on paper you are referring to are the LES series which incorporate multiple mediums and themes, can you tell us about them?

Originally I created these for a large scale mural project in the Lower East Side that wasn’t completed (the first failure) but I didn’t want to abandon them, I thought I could rework them and see what happened. I grabbed a big brush and some white paint and liberated them. Each piece is a journey, they are hard to take in all at once, you go down avenues and I think the change in medium helps facilitate that.

I have included lots of vignettes of New York in this work, they are full of stories of the Lower East Side where I lived and had a studio and fell in love. They also include my influences and fellow artists works, for example ABC NO Rio 2 depicts, in part, a street art piece by painter Tom Sanford, who I thought so generous to toil for many days on a transitory work, I wanted to recognize that… I was also tempted to steal one!

3/ How does being Australian inform your work?

What, because I mentioned stealing! One thing I realized about Australians is that it is ingrained in our culture to break rules, we encourage the larrakin, a term that is synonymous with being mischievous. This manifests in my work in numerous ways, one example is in the use of materials such as watercolor. Purists of the medium frown on the use of white paint. So I ‘cheat’ and paint over mistakes, then I regret it and try and make it up. That’s my process, intrigue and deception!. And paper is great, you can’t lie, you see every mark and that is the joy of making and owning art, seeing the hand and shaky heart of the artist.

Also part of the rule breaking is a dialogue I have been having for awhile now with Sol LeWitt. I was in a show at MOCA Massachusetts curated by Regina Basha with a piece called Messing with Sol where I distorted some of his work. I admire artists who have a clear framework, but I also want to tear frameworks down. I came back to his guidelines for this series to help gain some cohesion in the work, or in some ways legitimize it, back to that inner critic!

4/ If not humor, per se, there seems to be a lot of tongue in cheek in your work. Massaging a dead chicken for example…

The funny thing about that piece is that it was picked up by comedy central’s Tosh.0, they made fun of it without somehow realizing that is what I was doing, but hey, it made me ‘internet famous’! I like the idea that subtle change and humor can be more affective than grand gestures. That piece was talking about the practice of selling live chickens in Harlem in a place next door to the space that Chashama made available for the show. Working in a public space is great as you can really have a dialogue with a neighborhood, I confused a lot of people by displaying a chicken being massaged in the window right next door. It was playing with opposites, the antithesis of the life of those chickens, but also ridiculous because it was already dead. It wasn’t a political statement about the plight of the live chickens. None of my work is overtly political, it feels inauthentic to me if I attempt it. I think growing up poor informs you in a different way, I don’t have the guilt of privilege that can lead some artists down a righteous path. I am happy to observe my life and talk about it (even make fun of it) without needing a purpose, that seems very Seinfeld somehow…  

I think what is really impactful is changing the way people view things. Technology has done that. It doesn’t dwell on the sociopolitical spectrum. I want to be more like a technologist a or an engineer, not an activist. All I have to contribute are my own thoughts and ideas which aren’t anything controversial or even interesting but there is a curiosity in the mundane, the slightly off kilter, the in-between that fascinates.

5/ Your Projection Paintings use a technique I have never seen before, can you tell us about it?

It’s strange that this technique wasn’t being used in Lumiere’s day, it is actually quite low tech. A movie is projected onto a canvas and the paused movie scene is painted on the canvas. When exhibiting the movie plays and matches up with the canvas, it causes a strange relationship with space, it activates the painting, in a way that a static painting cannot. For the implosion movie this was particularly dramatic when the movie meets the falling building.

6/ Most of the works have some kind of reference materials, images that you cut and paste together to form a narrative. How important is that process and the technology you use?

My first profession was as a graphic designer and the tools available through photoshop are powerful to sketch ideas that would have been difficult to visualize in any other way. Even photographing the work and viewing it from that critical viewpoint is helpful to gain perspective. Working with a facsimile can also be liberating in a way. You can move far away from the original and yet keep coming back to it when you get lost, it acts as a security. Just starting with a blank canvas is terrifying.

Tara de la Garza: taradelagarza.com

The Lodge Gallery: thelodgegallery.com 131 Chrystie St., NYC

continues through Jan 12:

Totally Gay for Sports
 curated by Paul Brainard
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC

“Tired of seeing shows on the Lower East Side that look like bank lobbies? me too.” says Paul Brainard, the artist/curator behind this refreshingly original exhibition:

“It was very important to me personally to organize a show that dealt with issues of homophobia and the unfortunate cult of sports personality. I think that sports culture is one of the last areas of extreme homophobia and this was part of my impetus to organize a show that would deal with some of these issues. It was also important how the show would be perceived by the gay community and thus far we have only had a positive response. It has been very interesting for me to see the show deal with questions of sexuality, homosexuality and gender from many different perspectives.”

Artists: Paul Brainard, Chris Caccamise, Peter Daverington, TM Davy, Franklin Evans, Evie Falci, Dawn Frasch, Duncan Hannah, Kurt Kauper, Hyun Jin Alex Park, Jean Pierre Roy, Tom Sanford, Lane Twitchell, Eric White, Barnaby Whitfield, Kelli Williams

Opens Tues, Nov 19, 5-9p:

Salon des Refusés
 curated by Michael Anderson

Artion Gallery, 275 Water St., NYC

The Salon des Refusés is French for “Exhibition of Rejects,” originally referring to the Paris Salon of 1863. Normally, this would refer to any exhibition of works rejected from a juried art show. Artist Michael Anderson, as curator of the exhibition, brings together a group of New York artists and longtime friends who produce uncomfortable work that is both beautiful and stimulating.

Artists Include: Aaron Johnson, Alfred Steiner, Debra Hampton, Jessica Speckhard, Michael Anderson, Noah Becker, and Tom Sanford (works pictured here).

opens Fri, Sept 6, 6-8p:

Café des Artistes
 Tom Sanford

Kravets/Wehby Gallery, 521 W21st St., NYC

Sanford presents a series of 10 portraits of notable New Yorkers as well as three larger “New York genre paintings” depicting scenes of extraordinary New Yorkers engaged in the motions and activities of an ordinary life. Some of the characters included are Walt Frazier, Tina Fey, RZA, Jonathan Lethem, Diane Von Furstenberg, Bill T Jones, Woody Allen, Nicole Eisenmann, Carlo McCormick, Spike Lee and Mayor Michael Bloomberg.  - thru Oct 12

Opens Thurs, July 11, 6-8p:

HELLO NASTY
 curated by Chris Bors

Cindy Rucker Gallery, 141 Attorney St., NYC

The work in this show is grotesque, in every sense of the word; outlandish actions, disfigured forms, and bizarre scenes pepper the works and transform the gallery into a twisted Freak Show. - thru Aug 9

artists: Chris Bors, Paul Brainard, Dawn Frasch, Aaron Johnson, Hein Koh, Tom Sanford, and Aaron Zimmerman

pictured:

Chris Bors, No Redeeming Social Value, 2013, acrylic on canvas, 43 1/2” x 34”. © Chris Bors. Courtesy the artist.

Aaron Johnson, Mooncusser, 2012, acrylic and socks on linen, 40” x 32”. Courtesy the artist.

Opens Tonight, Aug 16, 6-9p: “The Double Dirty Dozen”Freight + Volume Gallery, 530 W24th St., NYClarge group exhibition about the quest for freedom of expression – sexual, intellectual, spiritual, political - and ultimately salvation through making art. - thru Sept 22Artists: Michael Anderson, David Baskin, Chris Biddy, Ion Birch, Paul Brainard, Shiva Burgos, Richard Butler, Francesco Civetta aka DJ CASH, Andy Cross, Jules De Balincourt, Erik Den Breejen, Kent Dorn, Joel Dugan, Austin Eddy, Johnston Foster, Rebecca Goyette, Duncan Hannah, Daniel Heidkamp, David Humphrey, George Jenne / Damian Stamer, Aaron Johnson, Ezra Johnson, Misaki Kawai, Kevin Kay, David Kramer, Maria Kreyn, Hye Rim Lee, Travis Lindquist, Noah Lyon, Panni Malekzadeh, Andrea Mary Marshall, Taylor McKimens, Greg Miller, Jazz-minh Moore, Joe Heaps Nelson, Lance Rautzhan, Max Razdow, Tom Sanford, Bill Saylor, Kristen Schiele, Ryan Schneider, Andrew Smenos, Emet Sosna, Jennifer Sullivan, Ulrike Theusner, Russell Tyler, Eric White, Genevieve White, Kelli Williams and Nicole Wittenberg.

Opens Tonight, Aug 16, 6-9p:

The Double Dirty Dozen

Freight + Volume Gallery, 530 W24th St., NYC

large group exhibition about the quest for freedom of expression – sexual, intellectual, spiritual, political - and ultimately salvation through making art. - thru Sept 22

Artists: Michael Anderson, David Baskin, Chris Biddy, Ion Birch, Paul Brainard, Shiva Burgos, Richard Butler, Francesco Civetta aka DJ CASH, Andy Cross, Jules De Balincourt, Erik Den Breejen, Kent Dorn, Joel Dugan, Austin Eddy, Johnston Foster, Rebecca Goyette, Duncan Hannah, Daniel Heidkamp, David Humphrey, George Jenne / Damian Stamer, Aaron Johnson, Ezra Johnson, Misaki Kawai, Kevin Kay, David Kramer, Maria Kreyn, Hye Rim Lee, Travis Lindquist, Noah Lyon, Panni Malekzadeh, Andrea Mary Marshall, Taylor McKimens, Greg Miller, Jazz-minh Moore, Joe Heaps Nelson, Lance Rautzhan, Max Razdow, Tom Sanford, Bill Saylor, Kristen Schiele, Ryan Schneider, Andrew Smenos, Emet Sosna, Jennifer Sullivan, Ulrike Theusner, Russell Tyler, Eric White, Genevieve White, Kelli Williams and Nicole Wittenberg.

Artist Reception,  Tuesday, June 26, 6pm: “SAINTS OF THE LOWER EAST SIDE”Tom SanfordFABnyc, 75 East 4th St., NYC (bt Bowery & 2nd Ave)An outdoor exhibition of paintings by artist Tom Sanford. This is the latest in a strong series of public artworks in Manhattan’s Cultural District, led by FABnyc’s recently appointed Director of Public Art, Keith Schweitzer (the same curator who brought us last year’s Coney Island Murals and helped to bring us this year’s celebrated “This Side of Paradise” exhibition in the Bronx).“For a few months, seven local cultural heroes (Martin Wong, Joey Ramone, Miguel Piñero, Ellen Stewart, Charlie Parker, WeeGee and Allen Ginsberg) will remind passersby that history was made here and it was awesome. Sandwiched between the Ellen Stewart Theater and the offices of La Mama etc., the spot is rich with local history and I have a feeling these large icon-like panels may just spark people’s interest into delving a little deeper into the history of this once cutting-edge neighborhood.” - Hyperallergic“I have always thought of the LES as a sort of cultural crucible, i guess that is how it is presented in fiction and the movies, so i thought about a way to show reverence for the artistic past of the neighborhood… these artists most epitomize the LES for me. It is the legends of the Lower East Side that inspire me. I could have chosen to paint Johnny Thunder, John Sex, David Wojnarowicz, Ornette Coleman or so many others, but these are the seven that I chose, and seven fit the space.” - artist Tom Sanford-thru Sept 5. photo: Udom Surangsophon

Artist Reception,  Tuesday, June 26, 6pm:

SAINTS OF THE LOWER EAST SIDE
Tom Sanford

FABnyc, 75 East 4th St., NYC (bt Bowery & 2nd Ave)

An outdoor exhibition of paintings by artist Tom Sanford. This is the latest in a strong series of public artworks in Manhattan’s Cultural District, led by FABnyc’s recently appointed Director of Public Art, Keith Schweitzer (the same curator who brought us last year’s Coney Island Murals and helped to bring us this year’s celebrated “This Side of Paradise” exhibition in the Bronx).

“For a few months, seven local cultural heroes (Martin Wong, Joey Ramone, Miguel Piñero, Ellen Stewart, Charlie Parker, WeeGee and Allen Ginsberg) will remind passersby that history was made here and it was awesome. Sandwiched between the Ellen Stewart Theater and the offices of La Mama etc., the spot is rich with local history and I have a feeling these large icon-like panels may just spark people’s interest into delving a little deeper into the history of this once cutting-edge neighborhood.” - Hyperallergic

“I have always thought of the LES as a sort of cultural crucible, i guess that is how it is presented in fiction and the movies, so i thought about a way to show reverence for the artistic past of the neighborhood… these artists most epitomize the LES for me. It is the legends of the Lower East Side that inspire me. I could have chosen to paint Johnny Thunder, John Sex, David Wojnarowicz, Ornette Coleman or so many others, but these are the seven that I chose, and seven fit the space.” - artist Tom Sanford

-thru Sept 5. photo: Udom Surangsophon

(Source: nycartscene)

Opens Tuesday, June 26, 6-8p:

Our Ladies of Infamy and Grandeur
 Graham Preston

East Village Visitors Center, 75 East 4th St., NYC (bt 2nd Ave & Bowery)

The exhibition of five gilded paintings will honor the exploits, undertakings and legends of lost cultural heroines from Manhattan’s historical Five Points neighborhood.

Preston arrived at the concept for this series through numerous conversations with his friend and mentor, Tom Sanford. Additionally, in the artist’s words, “I came up with the initial idea for this series of paintings while reading ‘The Blackest Bird’ by NYC author Joel Rose. I wanted to explore the lore of embellished accounts from Manhattan’s early days […] The implied iconography in these paintings calls our attention to narratives which, in some cases, have managed to live on through time as mere sentiments found within a few sentences in a couple of books […] I wanted to make small paintings which glorify small events by rather insignificant and even infamous individuals within the context of our written histories.”

Presented by Fourth Arts Block. Curated by Keith Schweitzer.- thru Sept 5

Artist Reception, Next Tuesday, June 26, 6pm: “SAINTS OF THE LOWER EAST SIDE” Tom SanfordFABnyc, 75 East 4th St., NYC (bt Bowery & 2nd Ave)An outdoor exhibition of paintings by artist Tom Sanford. This is the latest in a strong series of public artworks in Manhattan’s Cultural District, led by FABnyc’s recently appointed Director of Public Art, Keith Schweitzer (the same curator who brought us last year’s Coney Island Murals and helped to bring us this year’s celebrated “This Side of Paradise" exhibition in the Bronx)."For a few months, seven local cultural heroes (Martin Wong, Joey Ramone, Miguel Piñero, Ellen Stewart, Charlie Parker, WeeGee and Allen Ginsberg) will remind passersby that history was made here and it was awesome. Sandwiched between the Ellen Stewart Theater and the offices of La Mama etc., the spot is rich with local history and I have a feeling these large icon-like panels may just spark people’s interest into delving a little deeper into the history of this once cutting-edge neighborhood.” - Hyperallergic"I have always thought of the LES as a sort of cultural crucible, i guess that is how it is presented in fiction and the movies, so i thought about a way to show reverence for the artistic past of the neighborhood… these artists most epitomize the LES for me. It is the legends of the Lower East Side that inspire me. I could have chosen to paint Johnny Thunder, John Sex, David Wojnarowicz, Ornette Coleman or so many others, but these are the seven that I chose, and seven fit the space." - artist Tom Sanford-thru Sept 5. photo: Udom Surangsophon

Artist Reception, Next Tuesday, June 26, 6pm:

SAINTS OF THE LOWER EAST SIDE
 Tom Sanford

FABnyc, 75 East 4th St., NYC (bt Bowery & 2nd Ave)

An outdoor exhibition of paintings by artist Tom Sanford. This is the latest in a strong series of public artworks in Manhattan’s Cultural District, led by FABnyc’s recently appointed Director of Public Art, Keith Schweitzer (the same curator who brought us last year’s Coney Island Murals and helped to bring us this year’s celebrated “This Side of Paradise" exhibition in the Bronx).

"For a few months, seven local cultural heroes (Martin Wong, Joey Ramone, Miguel Piñero, Ellen Stewart, Charlie Parker, WeeGee and Allen Ginsberg) will remind passersby that history was made here and it was awesome. Sandwiched between the Ellen Stewart Theater and the offices of La Mama etc., the spot is rich with local history and I have a feeling these large icon-like panels may just spark people’s interest into delving a little deeper into the history of this once cutting-edge neighborhood.” - Hyperallergic

"I have always thought of the LES as a sort of cultural crucible, i guess that is how it is presented in fiction and the movies, so i thought about a way to show reverence for the artistic past of the neighborhood… these artists most epitomize the LES for me. It is the legends of the Lower East Side that inspire me. I could have chosen to paint Johnny Thunder, John Sex, David Wojnarowicz, Ornette Coleman or so many others, but these are the seven that I chose, and seven fit the space." - artist Tom Sanford

-thru Sept 5. photo: Udom Surangsophon

Artist Talk, Today 2p:
Kiron Robinson
apexart, 291 Church St., NYCapexart and Bad at Sports collaborate again for their Resident Talk with current apexart Inbound Resident, Kiron Robinson, visiting from Melbourne, Australia. Amanda Browder and Tom Sanford from the Bad at Sports team will interview Kiron on a ferry.

Artist Talk, Today 2p:

Kiron Robinson

apexart, 291 Church St., NYC

apexart and Bad at Sports collaborate again for their Resident Talk with current apexart Inbound Resident, Kiron Robinson, visiting from Melbourne, Australia. Amanda Browder and Tom Sanford from the Bad at Sports team will interview Kiron on a ferry.