nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

currently on view outdoors:Fabrizio MorettiArtist (and drummer for The Strokes) Fabrizio Moretti recently installed an array of sculptures: vaulted recesses on Elizabeth Street in Soho (at East Houston Street), each containing an astronaut. Moretti will also be participating in a group exhibition with a Lower East Side artist collective at The Lodge Gallery, opening this Tuesday night, 6pm.photo: instagram.com/imnachofriend

currently on view outdoors:
Fabrizio Moretti

Artist (and drummer for The Strokes) Fabrizio Moretti recently installed an array of sculptures: vaulted recesses on Elizabeth Street in Soho (at East Houston Street), each containing an astronaut.

Moretti will also be participating in a group exhibition with a Lower East Side artist collective at The Lodge Gallery, opening this Tuesday night, 6pm.

photo: instagram.com/imnachofriend

recently opened:“Change and Horizontals” Sean ScullyThe Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC$5 (admission is free on Thursdays, 6–8pm)This intensely focused survey comprises Sean Scully’s acrylic, ink, graphite, and masking-tape drawings from 1974–75—presented together for the first time in over 30 years—as well as two large-scale paintings from the same period and one of the artist’s personal notebooks. Scully’s maturation as a painter can easily be traced back to innovations in his early drawings. These drawings are marked by refined geometries that re-imagine the history of abstraction as an art rooted in experience—“something felt and something seen,” as the artist has said. Executed in London and New York City respectively, the Change and Horizontals drawings, along with their preparatory sketches and never-before-seen experimental typewriter drawings from the same period, highlight Scully’s core concern with line and color’s relation to place. Viewed together, the works chart an evolution of composition and gesture that provides unique insight into this artist’s singular aesthetic. This New York exhibition is the last stop on a tour that included the UK, Germany, and Italy. - thru Nov 3

recently opened:

Change and Horizontals
 Sean Scully

The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC
$5 (admission is free on Thursdays, 6–8pm)

This intensely focused survey comprises Sean Scully’s acrylic, ink, graphite, and masking-tape drawings from 1974–75—presented together for the first time in over 30 years—as well as two large-scale paintings from the same period and one of the artist’s personal notebooks. Scully’s maturation as a painter can easily be traced back to innovations in his early drawings. These drawings are marked by refined geometries that re-imagine the history of abstraction as an art rooted in experience—“something felt and something seen,” as the artist has said. Executed in London and New York City respectively, the Change and Horizontals drawings, along with their preparatory sketches and never-before-seen experimental typewriter drawings from the same period, highlight Scully’s core concern with line and color’s relation to place. Viewed together, the works chart an evolution of composition and gesture that provides unique insight into this artist’s singular aesthetic. This New York exhibition is the last stop on a tour that included the UK, Germany, and Italy. - thru Nov 3

Opens Tues, June 18, 6-9p:“Slow and Steady Wins the Race, Works on Paper 1962–2010” Ken PriceThe Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYCThis exhibition marks the first survey of drawings by Ken Price, an artist best known for his sculptural work. A selection of 65 works on paper will track Price’s pursuit of drawing over 50 years and will demonstrate a wide range of characters and techniques. This exhibition will open concurrently on June 18 with the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s presentation of the traveling retrospective of Price’s sculpture that originated at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.  - thru Aug 18

Opens Tues, June 18, 6-9p:

Slow and Steady Wins the Race, Works on Paper 1962–2010”
 Ken Price

The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC

This exhibition marks the first survey of drawings by Ken Price, an artist best known for his sculptural work. A selection of 65 works on paper will track Price’s pursuit of drawing over 50 years and will demonstrate a wide range of characters and techniques. This exhibition will open concurrently on June 18 with the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s presentation of the traveling retrospective of Price’s sculpture that originated at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.  - thru Aug 18

Opens Tomorrow, Thurs, Apr 4, 6-8p: “L’Argento” Giosetta FioroniThe Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYCItalian artist Giosetta Fioroni’s first solo show in North America; featuring over 80 works in drawing, painting, film, theater design, and illustration, dating from the 1950s to the mid-1970s, decades during which the artist formulated a unique response to a developing commercial culture. Although many of the works are executed on canvas, drawing remains at the forefront of Fioroni’s oeuvre, and her investment in hand-rendering serves to distinguish her practice from that of her American Pop Art peers.

Opens Tomorrow, Thurs, Apr 4, 6-8p:

L’Argento
 Giosetta Fioroni

The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC

Italian artist Giosetta Fioroni’s first solo show in North America; featuring over 80 works in drawing, painting, film, theater design, and illustration, dating from the 1950s to the mid-1970s, decades during which the artist formulated a unique response to a developing commercial culture. Although many of the works are executed on canvas, drawing remains at the forefront of Fioroni’s oeuvre, and her investment in hand-rendering serves to distinguish her practice from that of her American Pop Art peers.

Opens Thurs, Feb 21, 6-8p: “Untitled ‘13” Gert & Uwe TobiasTeam Gallery, 83 Grand St., NYCTeam Gallery, 47 Wooster St., NYCan exhibition, in both Team Gallery locations, of new work by the Romanian-born, Köln-based artists Gert & Uwe Tobias. The tableaux of the new works on view include the macabre and fractured figures the artists are known for, mounted to inky black color fields with baroque furniture centerpieces. Also included in this latest exhibition are over two-dozen new works on paper which locate printed found images within lushly painted backgrounds. - thru Mar 30

Opens Thurs, Feb 21, 6-8p:

Untitled ‘13
 Gert & Uwe Tobias

Team Gallery, 83 Grand St., NYC
Team Gallery, 47 Wooster St., NYC

an exhibition, in both Team Gallery locations, of new work by the Romanian-born, Köln-based artists Gert & Uwe Tobias. The tableaux of the new works on view include the macabre and fractured figures the artists are known for, mounted to inky black color fields with baroque furniture centerpieces. Also included in this latest exhibition are over two-dozen new works on paper which locate printed found images within lushly painted backgrounds. - thru Mar 30

nycARTscene Interview: Saya Woolfalk

Saya Woolfalk’s exhibition “Chimera” is currently on view at Third Streaming and runs through April 25, 2013 with a related performance on March 7, 2013.

nycARTscene’s Hannah Krafcik leads us in conversation with the artist:

HK: You present your artwork as fragments of a fantastical world beyond what we know. Our only point of access is through what you show us, and this is all birthed from a detailed narrative. Can you summarize the narrative through-line of your work?

SW: The video in my show at Third Streaming, “Tour of the Institute of Empathy,” tells the entire story of the Empathics: they develop second heads; have hallucinations of various forms of biological and cultural mixture; and activate what they see in their hallucinations through various social “formations.”

This narrative has emerged through process. As I collaborate across disciplines one project comes out of the last. I attempt to follow the stories that emerge and tease them out to their logical conclusions.

I have been working on No Place and the Empathics for 6 years. From 2006-2008, I worked with filmmaker and anthropologist Rachel Lears to document a fictional future utopian world called No Place. The people of No Place are part human and part plant and change gender and color and transform into the landscape when they die. They also transform recycled materials into usable technologies. We presented our collaboration as film called Ethnography of No Place.

In 2009, I started to think about how people in the present might actually become like the people of this fictional future, and I started working with dancers, biologists, and neuroscientists to explore this concept. In 2012, I presented the material at the Montclair Art Museum, and decided to use ethnographic museum techniques to tell the story as it had emerged.

HK: The No Placeans and Empathics’ world is comprised of what many consider a “craft” aesthetic, but interspersed are other objects recognizable from theater and performance. Can you speak to the blending of materials in your work?

SW: I love the idea that ordinary materials can be transformed into magical things. Since early in my art education the transformation of domestic materials and objects was presented as a powerful method for making art. I studied feminist art at Brown and worked with Faith Wilding at the Art Institute of Chicago (one of the founding participants of Womanhouse). As a kid, I also learned to sew from my grandmother in Japan; and, before I had a studio, sewing was a way I could make work on a domestic scale. Slowly the small objects transformed into immersive environments. After spending time in Brazil studying Carnaval, I started to build entire performative fantastical worlds.

HK: How has your interest in anthropology paved the way for your trajectory in visual art?  Does this have any bearing on the multi-media and performative nature of what you create?

SW: When I started working, I was looking for a way to describe alternative world systems through playful artmaking. By using the descriptive methods of anthropology—poking fun at them, while also thinking with them—I have been able to immerse myself in the logics of the places I construct. I am also surrounded by anthropology everyday. My husband is an anthropologist, and he is one of my inspirations.

HK: Because you take such an anthropological approach to discussing and presenting your work, people who visit your exhibitions have been know to wonder if what you are “studying” might actually be real. Do you think it is? Did you create these beings? Are they from the future, do they exist in an alternate reality, or do they come into being from your imagination?

SW: I love this question. I do think Empathics exist. They are people who struggle with intergroup contact and attempt to take disparate material and fuse it and make it make sense. In some way we are all Empathics. Being an Empathics is a kind of metaphor for the gradual transformation of US culture. In the US we experience conflict because of intergroup contact. We then incorporate parts of other cultures into our own. The nature of what it means to be United Statesian is constantly changing because of these contact points and our gradual transformation.

HK:  Though you are based in New York City, you frequently show work outside of New York in the North East. Does your work and its intersection with nature draw you away from urban environments? What brings you back to New York for your latest exhibition, Chimera?

SW: As I enter into my next project, “Land of the Pleasure Machines”—which is about biological and the technological mixture—movement between the urban and natural environments will emerge as an important element of my work. We have a little place we like to go in the woods of upstate NY where I can think and read and take walks with my husband and our daughter. The impact of these real experiences can be felt, and that’s what I love about Yona’s space [Third Streaming]. It is a wonderful urban place where many kinds of people come in contact with each other so that art and life can happen. It is a place where art is living and breathing and all sorts of fantastical things can happen.

Third Streaming: 10 Greene Street, NY, NY thirdstreaming.com

Saya Woolfalk: www.sayawoolfalk.com

Tonight 6:30p:

Phase I: Drafts, Advanced Mechanics of Materials
 Zoe Beloff, Kamau Amu Patton, Mark Sussman
 organized by Kaegan Sparks

The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC
Admission is free on Thursdays, 6–8pm

Phase I of Drafts, Advanced Mechanics of Materials, will consider drawing as an index of movement. Zoe Beloff will present a screening and talk on a multimedia project exploring the intersection of the cinematic apparatus, industrial management, and modernism. Kamau Amu Patton will present a live performance using an amplified extended drawing system. Mark Sussman will give a talk on contemporary toy theater and the live animation of objects, on both tabletop and screen.

thru March 13:

The Pledge
 Alexandre Singh

The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster St., NYC

The first North American museum exhibition of works by Alexandre Singh, this presentation will be comprised of the artist’s new series of Assembly Instructions entitled The Pledge. This project takes interviews that the artist conducted throughout 2011 with noted scientists, artists, writers, and filmmakers, and transforms them into fictional dialogues visualized according to Singh’s signature format of collaged photocopies connected by hand-drawn pencil dots on the wall. Filling the Main Gallery, Singh’s fictionalized—and spatialized—interviews will position drawing not only as a physical gesture, but also as a graphic conduit for the imaginative process.


Just Opened: “The Nemesims” Muntean/RosenblumTeam Gallery, 47 Wooster St., NYCan installation by Vienna-based artists Muntean/Rosenblum. For this exhibition, Muntean/Rosenblum transform the gallery space into an exacting recreation of a home from Will Wright’s popular life simulation computer game The Sims. The artists recontextualize the site of artificial life as a display for contemporary art, adorning the walls of the home with their new work installed alongside works by well-known mid-century and contemporary artists. The installation includes historical pieces by Alexander Calder, Gilbert & George, Keith Haring, John McCracken, Raymond Pettibon, and Laurie Simmons, among others. - thru Dec 21

Just Opened:

The Nemesims
 Muntean/Rosenblum

Team Gallery, 47 Wooster St., NYC

an installation by Vienna-based artists Muntean/Rosenblum. For this exhibition, Muntean/Rosenblum transform the gallery space into an exacting recreation of a home from Will Wright’s popular life simulation computer game The Sims. The artists recontextualize the site of artificial life as a display for contemporary art, adorning the walls of the home with their new work installed alongside works by well-known mid-century and contemporary artists. The installation includes historical pieces by Alexander Calder, Gilbert & George, Keith Haring, John McCracken, Raymond Pettibon, and Laurie Simmons, among others. - thru Dec 21

thru July 8: “David Malek”Golden Gallery, 120 Elizabeth St., NYC (b/t Grand & Broome)We’re having fun imagining that this exhibition of is a statement on the current 100°F heat enveloping NYC.

thru July 8:

David Malek

Golden Gallery, 120 Elizabeth St., NYC (b/t Grand & Broome)

We’re having fun imagining that this exhibition of is a statement on the current 100°F heat enveloping NYC.