nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru Jan 6: “the event of a thread” Ann HamiltonPark Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., NYC (bt 66th & 67th)Tickets $12 General, $10 Students/Seniors, Free for Kids"At its core, the installation features two fields of suspended swings connected via ropes and pulleys to each other and to a massive white curtain that bisects the 55,000-square-foot Wade Thompson Drill Hall. Each swing has its counterpart on the other side and it is the visitor’s momentum on the swing that activates a rolling undulation of the curtain. The resultant movement brought on by one swing is enhanced when another visitor engages the corresponding swing on the opposite side. The movement of the curtain alone is mesmerizing and the beauty is that the curtain remains in a continual state of flux set in motion by the interaction of visitors." - Hyperallergicphoto: James Ewing

thru Jan 6:

the event of a thread
 Ann Hamilton

Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., NYC (bt 66th & 67th)
Tickets $12 General, $10 Students/Seniors, Free for Kids

"At its core, the installation features two fields of suspended swings connected via ropes and pulleys to each other and to a massive white curtain that bisects the 55,000-square-foot Wade Thompson Drill Hall. Each swing has its counterpart on the other side and it is the visitor’s momentum on the swing that activates a rolling undulation of the curtain. The resultant movement brought on by one swing is enhanced when another visitor engages the corresponding swing on the opposite side. The movement of the curtain alone is mesmerizing and the beauty is that the curtain remains in a continual state of flux set in motion by the interaction of visitors." - Hyperallergic
photo: James Ewing

Opens Today: “The Murder of Crows” Janet Cardiff & George Bures MillerPark Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., NYC (bt 66th & 67th St.)$10/$12 Admission (Free Sat, Aug 4)“Few artists work with sound more inventively and with a cannier sense of theater than [Cardiff and Miller].” – The New York Times The largest sound installation to date by artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, The Murder of Crows is a compelling “sound play” that envelops the audience in an unexpected physical and aural environment. Moving and weaving through ninety-eight speakers mounted within the cavernous Drill Hall, the work narrates a captivating and confounding melodrama, investigating concepts of desire, intimacy, love and loss. The multifaceted soundscape uses a fluttering of voices and sounds, from crashing waves to the hubbub of a factory floor, to transport the listener to an unexpected dream-like world. - thru Sept 9

Opens Today:

The Murder of Crows
 Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller

Park Avenue Armory
, 643 Park Ave., NYC (bt 66th & 67th St.)
$10/$12 Admission (Free Sat, Aug 4)

“Few artists work with sound more inventively and with a cannier sense of theater than [Cardiff and Miller].” – The New York Times

The largest sound installation to date by artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, The Murder of Crows is a compelling “sound play” that envelops the audience in an unexpected physical and aural environment. Moving and weaving through ninety-eight speakers mounted within the cavernous Drill Hall, the work narrates a captivating and confounding melodrama, investigating concepts of desire, intimacy, love and loss. The multifaceted soundscape uses a fluttering of voices and sounds, from crashing waves to the hubbub of a factory floor, to transport the listener to an unexpected dream-like world. - thru Sept 9

Thru June 17:

SPACE PROGRAM: MARS
 Tom Sachs

Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., NYC (bt 66th & 67th St)
Tickets: $12

“One of the brightest, most entertaining, and most voraciously inquisitive artists on the contemporary scene.” –Artinfo

Artist Tom Sachs takes his SPACE PROGRAM to the next level with a four week mission to Mars that recasts the 55,000 square foot [Park Avenue Armory] as an immersive space odyssey with an installation of dynamic and meticulously crafted sculptures. Using his signature bricolage technique and simple materials that comprise the daily surrounds of his New York studio, Sachs engineers the component parts of the mission—exploratory vehicles, mission control, launch platforms, suiting stations, special effects, recreational amenities, and Mars landscape—exposing as much the process of their making as the complexities of the culture they reference.