nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

recommended:“the second life of flowers” Sirikul Pattachote The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYCfirst New York gallery exhibition of Thailand born painter Sirikul Pattachote. “The brittle decomposition of a flower at the end of its purpose is a slow and lonely, bittersweet journey. We can use words like this to describe the action because it is so familiar to our own human experience. Just as the flower serves its purpose we serve ours, we both flourish in the sunshine and grow uniquely beautiful before we leave our legacy and drop our petals along the path to becoming a memory. The ephemeral quality of life and matter is a central theme in Pattachote’s work. Through her paintings, she attempts to record and preserve certain memories and impressions that highlight the potential good that lies in everyone and everything.” - thru Aug 7

recommended:

the second life of flowers
 Sirikul Pattachote
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC

first New York gallery exhibition of Thailand born painter Sirikul Pattachote. “The brittle decomposition of a flower at the end of its purpose is a slow and lonely, bittersweet journey. We can use words like this to describe the action because it is so familiar to our own human experience. Just as the flower serves its purpose we serve ours, we both flourish in the sunshine and grow uniquely beautiful before we leave our legacy and drop our petals along the path to becoming a memory. The ephemeral quality of life and matter is a central theme in Pattachote’s work. Through her paintings, she attempts to record and preserve certain memories and impressions that highlight the potential good that lies in everyone and everything.” - thru Aug 7

opens tonight, Sat, June 28, 6-8p:“The Crystal Palace” Rachel Uffner Gallery, 170 Suffolk St., NYC“Named after the site of the first World’s Fair in London in 1851, and on the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, this exhibition aims to take advantage of New York City’s cultural and neighborhood-based diversity in the cacophonous spirit of the Fair, which evolved from focusing on industrialized innovation to a thematic form of cultural exchange. In an attempt to infuse the growing contemporary art district of the Lower East Side with the historical weight of Upper East Side institutions, Rachel Uffner Gallery will exhibit artwork from the vast archives of Richard L. Feigen & Co., and additional private lenders and estates, in conjunction with contemporary artists conversing with their fore-bearers in a thoughtful manner. A cross-cultural-pollination is to be formed, spanning over neighborhoods and over time.”Artists: Balthus, Joseph Cornell, Daniel Gordon, Van Hanos, Robert Indiana, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Ray Johnson, Anya Kielar, Claes Oldenburg, Dushko Petrovich and Roger White, James Rosenquist, Pierre Roy, Peter Saul, Johannes VanDerBeek, and Stan VanDerBeek

opens tonight, Sat, June 28, 6-8p:

The Crystal Palace
 
Rachel Uffner Gallery, 170 Suffolk St., NYC

“Named after the site of the first World’s Fair in London in 1851, and on the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, this exhibition aims to take advantage of New York City’s cultural and neighborhood-based diversity in the cacophonous spirit of the Fair, which evolved from focusing on industrialized innovation to a thematic form of cultural exchange.
 
In an attempt to infuse the growing contemporary art district of the Lower East Side with the historical weight of Upper East Side institutions, Rachel Uffner Gallery will exhibit artwork from the vast archives of Richard L. Feigen & Co., and additional private lenders and estates, in conjunction with contemporary artists conversing with their fore-bearers in a thoughtful manner. A cross-cultural-pollination is to be formed, spanning over neighborhoods and over time.”

Artists: Balthus, Joseph Cornell, Daniel Gordon, Van Hanos, Robert Indiana, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Ray Johnson, Anya Kielar, Claes Oldenburg, Dushko Petrovich and Roger White, James Rosenquist, Pierre Roy, Peter Saul, Johannes VanDerBeek, and Stan VanDerBeek

just opened:“Gatekeeper” Liene Bosquê, Sinta Tantra, Kate Gilmore  William Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYCgroup show that explores ideas of access, and how the spaces we inhabit enforce or challenge the roles of gender, race, and economic inequalities within societies. Curated by Nicholas Cohn and Katie Whitepictured: Kate Gilmore, Wall Bearer, 2011, Performance Still

just opened:

Gatekeeper
 Liene Bosquê, Sinta Tantra, Kate Gilmore
 
William Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYC

group show that explores ideas of access, and how the spaces we inhabit enforce or challenge the roles of gender, race, and economic inequalities within societies. Curated by Nicholas Cohn and Katie White

pictured: Kate Gilmore, Wall Bearer, 2011, Performance Still

opens tonight, Wed, June 18, 6-8p:

Leaps into the Void: Shamanism, Meditation, Transcendence, Oblivion”
 Gwyn Joy, Sky Kim, Michael Maxwell,
 Joe Nanashe, Phoebe Rathmell
 
Garis & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYC

a group exhibition united by the philosophical underpinnings and practical objectives of each artist’s own practice in addressing concepts related to meditation and altered mental states, physical and mental transcendence and Eastern and Western belief systems related to cycles of life.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:“Figure Studies” Walter RobinsonLynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYCKnown for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Wed, May 28, 6-8p:

Figure Studies
 Walter Robinson

Lynch Tham Gallery, 175 Rivington St., NYC

Known for his figurative work, Robinson has created a new series of paintings based on common fashion promotional photographs, referenced from a variety of sources: department store flyers, daily newspapers and marketing emails, Macy’s, Target, JC Penney, Lands’ End and Bergdorf Goodman advertisements. The paintings segment and define their audience by gender, age and social role, with an implicit address to women, or to men, or to mothers, or to professionals. They are seasonal, identifiable as “summer” or “winter.” They contain markers of age and youth, of boyhood or girlhood.

opens Fri, May 23, 6-8p:

Geo Land
 Alain Biltereyst
 
Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

Belgium-based painter Alain Biltereyst’s small works on plywood are concerned with everyday, contemporary life. The artist is inspired by geometric forms that he sees on a daily basis, such as logos on currency, advertising on the sides of trucks, and fences against a landscape. He strives to interpret this ‘Geo Land’ into works that are “as simple and poetic as possible.” Formal repetition and color choices reflect the artist’s background in graphic design and fascination with commercial and other urban signs, where the lines between culture and subculture are blurred. Beneath the hard edge geometry of each composition, lies a painterly gesture, implying a depth in the otherwise flat composition. - thru June 22

thru May 31:“Sometimes Comes the Mother, Sometimes the Wolf” Matt BahenMunch Gallery, 245 Broome St., NYCan exhibition of small and large scale oil paintings by Canadian painter, Matt Bahen, recognized for his human scale works on canvas addressing themes of loss and the question of how to carry on. His use of a thick and heavily applied impasto technique emphasizes the visceral quality of the delivery and subject.

thru May 31:

Sometimes Comes the Mother, Sometimes the Wolf
 Matt Bahen

Munch Gallery, 245 Broome St., NYC

an exhibition of small and large scale oil paintings by Canadian painter, Matt Bahen, recognized for his human scale works on canvas addressing themes of loss and the question of how to carry on. His use of a thick and heavily applied impasto technique emphasizes the visceral quality of the delivery and subject.

opens tomorrow, Fri, May 16, 7-9p:

MARGINS
 Frank Webster
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC (bt Delancey & Broome)

Webster’s paintings depict post-industrial landscapes drawing on the aesthetic traditions of minimalism and realism. Summoning a sense of apocalyptic abandonedness, Webster’s compositions pair high-rise buildings with similarly scaled trees, liken barbed-wire fences and electrical wires to the creeping vines that entwine them, and present an urban ecosystem curiously devoid of inhabitants. - thru June 1

opens May 7, 6-8p:“WARP & WOOF” Alek O., Ayan Farah, Evan Robarts, Gabriel Pionkowski, Graham Wilson, Hank Willis Thomas, Henry Krokatsis, Johnny Abrahams, Kadar Brock, Moffat Takadiwa, Nika Neelova, Penny Lamb, Shinique Smith, Tonico Lemos Auad The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYCcurated by Toby Clarke and Kathy Grayson, the exhibit takes its title from the weaving terms “warp” (the vertical and static component of the weave) and “woof” (the dynamic and horizontal aspect of the weave), this exhibition looks at textile-driven abstraction across continents in emerging art. Ayan Farah, Kadar Brock, and Graham Wilson all create process-driven abstraction that includes serendipitous destruction and creation operating within the systems they have created. Evan Robarts, Hank Willis Thomas, Shinique Smith and Alek O. include found materials into their conceptual framework in a web of memory, history and cultural forces. Nika Neelova, Penny Lamb and Moffat Takadiwa use architectural ghosts to weave new artworks.

opens May 7, 6-8p:

WARP & WOOF
 Alek O., Ayan Farah, Evan Robarts, Gabriel Pionkowski,
 Graham Wilson, Hank Willis Thomas, Henry Krokatsis,
 Johnny Abrahams, Kadar Brock, Moffat Takadiwa,
 Nika Neelova, Penny Lamb, Shinique Smith, Tonico Lemos Auad
 
The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYC

curated by Toby Clarke and Kathy Grayson, the exhibit takes its title from the weaving terms “warp” (the vertical and static component of the weave) and “woof” (the dynamic and horizontal aspect of the weave), this exhibition looks at textile-driven abstraction across continents in emerging art. Ayan Farah, Kadar Brock, and Graham Wilson all create process-driven abstraction that includes serendipitous destruction and creation operating within the systems they have created. Evan Robarts, Hank Willis Thomas, Shinique Smith and Alek O. include found materials into their conceptual framework in a web of memory, history and cultural forces. Nika Neelova, Penny Lamb and Moffat Takadiwa use architectural ghosts to weave new artworks.

artwork focus:

El Diablo
 Ryan Schneider

currently on view in “Ritual for Letting Go” at:
Two Rams Gallery, 215 Bowery, NYC (entrance on Rivington)

84”x72”, oil on canvas, 2014

“El Diablo (pictured, top) began as an attempt to paint a giant ceramic bowl on a beach. Hopefully one day I will be able to pull that motif off, but in this instance, I was not. I worked on this big bowl with little crabs crawling all around it for about a day until I realized it was hopeless. This was not going to work- so I turned it around to face the wall and got really annoyed about the whole thing. Another giant canvas I was going to have to take off the stretcher, then stretch and gesso another one. It always breaks my heart a little when I can’t get it on the first try- but of course it happens all the time.

The next day I went to Pearl in the morning. I thought, ok, if I’m going to re-stretch this one and start over, then I’m going to get some really bright colors. I bought a bunch of nice paints- with a lot of very bright colors I hadn’t tried before- in particular an amazing orange I was really excited about. I also got some canvas.

When I got to the studio, I turned the canvas back around and studied it. What exactly was going on here? What did I see? I turned the canvas from horizontal to vertical (it’s 7x6 ft), and something clicked. That big bowl shape could be something else. Everything around the bowl (palms, crabs, clouds) was kind of working now that it was vertical, but the bowl had to transform. But into what? I immediately saw an owl- I kind of wanted to paint a big owl. But hadn’t I recently read some article somewhere about how owls were going to be really cool to paint this year, like cats were last year? Well then I’m definitely not painting an owl today. What else do I see? I saw a big mask. I’ve always wanted to paint a mask but felt like I shouldn’t because many artists before me have painted them. But I could really see it. This was going to have to be a big mask, and if it didn’t work, oh well.

I had to scrape away a lot of the wet paint that was there from the day before. Then I could almost immediately see where everything was going to go. I sketched it in- starting with the eyes and nose, naturally. Then I just started filling in big areas with color, beginning with orange. It was the most amazing orange I had ever seen, and I know that what goes really well with orange is turquoise, so I filled an area in with turquoise. Really quickly the mask took shape with bright wet paint, and looked really at home with the foliage and crabs all around it, even though they were sideways. I just left them as they were. Everything just kind of solidified.

It was a mask just floating there in the night. I was really attracted to it- it didn’t matter to me that it made no sense floating there. I imagined if I was walking on a tropical beach at night, the smells, the sounds of the waves and foliage blowing, and I happened upon this big mask floating in front of me. The mask was scary, but welcoming, and I was attracted to that. I added some stars in the sky and other details but wanted to keep it simple. By the night time I was finished. It almost felt as though it had painted itself.” -Ryan Schneider