nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens Fri, Oct 3, 6-9p:

Remain in Light
 Rose Eken
 
The Hole, 312 Bowery, NYC

“For the exhibition Eken will exhibit a forensic assortment of hand-painted ceramics arranged by size on the floor and three large tapestries on the walls. The sculptures will include all the objects one might find in a punk venue, perhaps even our former across-the-street neighbor here on the Bowery, CBGBs. From microphone stands all the way down to tiny bottle caps and guitar pics, these handmade and hand-painted objects will create a personalized memorial to NYC’s dwindling lawless zones and the mayhem they contained. Their anthropological arrangement on the floor suggests a methodical and scientific approach to categorizing and analyzing a lost culture, as though a forensic dig of the venue unearthed these strange relics.”

read our 2013 interview with Rose Eken  —>HERE<—

opens tonight, Wed, June 18, 6-8p:

Leaps into the Void: Shamanism, Meditation, Transcendence, Oblivion”
 Gwyn Joy, Sky Kim, Michael Maxwell,
 Joe Nanashe, Phoebe Rathmell
 
Garis & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYC

a group exhibition united by the philosophical underpinnings and practical objectives of each artist’s own practice in addressing concepts related to meditation and altered mental states, physical and mental transcendence and Eastern and Western belief systems related to cycles of life.

thru July 29:“Me, My Mother, My Father, and I” Ragnar Kjartansson New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYCthe first New York museum exhibition of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson presents works with and about his family, including a newly orchestrated performance and video piece entitled Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage (2011/2014), in which ten musicians play a live composition for the duration of the exhibition. This work takes inspiration from a scene in Iceland’s first feature film, Morðsaga (1977), directed by Reynir Oddsson, in which the main character of the film, played by Kjartansson’s mother, Guðrún Ásmundsdóttir, fantasizes about a plumber, played by Kjartansson’s father, Kjartan Ragnarsson, in a sex scene on the kitchen floor. As family legend has it, Kjartansson was conceived the night after the film shoot. Kjartan Sveinsson, composer and a former member of the Icelandic band Sigur Rós, transformed the scene’s dialogue into a ten-part polyphony played by ten musicians, who sing and play guitar in the tradition of the troubadour to accompany a projection of the original film scene. (photo: Benoit Pailley)

thru July 29:

Me, My Mother, My Father, and I
 Ragnar Kjartansson
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

the first New York museum exhibition of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson presents works with and about his family, including a newly orchestrated performance and video piece entitled Take Me Here by the Dishwasher: Memorial for a Marriage (2011/2014), in which ten musicians play a live composition for the duration of the exhibition. This work takes inspiration from a scene in Iceland’s first feature film, Morðsaga (1977), directed by Reynir Oddsson, in which the main character of the film, played by Kjartansson’s mother, Guðrún Ásmundsdóttir, fantasizes about a plumber, played by Kjartansson’s father, Kjartan Ragnarsson, in a sex scene on the kitchen floor. As family legend has it, Kjartansson was conceived the night after the film shoot. Kjartan Sveinsson, composer and a former member of the Icelandic band Sigur Rós, transformed the scene’s dialogue into a ten-part polyphony played by ten musicians, who sing and play guitar in the tradition of the troubadour to accompany a projection of the original film scene. (photo: Benoit Pailley)

opens Feb 12:

The Neighbors
 Paweł Althamer

New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC


On view on the Fourth, Third, and Second Floor galleries of New Museum, this will be the first US museum exhibition devoted to the work of Paweł Althamer. Since the early 1990s, Althamer (b. 1967 Warsaw, Poland) has established a unique artistic practice and is admired for his expanded approach to sculptural representation and his experimental models of social collaboration. Althamer is predominantly known for figurative sculptures of himself, his family, and various other individuals within his community. The exhibition will include a new presentation of the artist’s work Draftsmen’s Congress, originally presented at the 7th Berlin Biennial (2012). Over the course of the exhibition, the blank white space of the New Museum’s Fourth Floor gallery will be transformed through the gradual accumulation of drawings and paintings by Museum visitors and more than seventy invited community organizations. Althamer will also activate the exhibition through a sculptural workshop in which the artist and his collaborators will produce new works during the course of the show. For the duration of the exhibition, visitors bringing new or gently used men’s coats to the New Museum will receive free entry. All the coats will be donated to the Bowery Mission.

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:JOMAR STATKUNGaris &amp; Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYCAn exhibition of Jomar Statkun’s complete work to date. The collection will be installed in the gallery’s downstairs space, leaving the upstairs empty until work is introduced through weekly “decorations” that will slowly transform the main space. Through participation and performance, visitors will be invited to the basement “Public Viewing Room” to interact with the artist as well as look at, examine, and handle the works of art. - thru Feb 23

opens tonight, Sun, Jan 19, 6-8p:

JOMAR STATKUN

Garis & Hahn Gallery, 263 Bowery, NYC

An exhibition of Jomar Statkun’s complete work to date. The collection will be installed in the gallery’s downstairs space, leaving the upstairs empty until work is introduced through weekly “decorations” that will slowly transform the main space. Through participation and performance, visitors will be invited to the basement “Public Viewing Room” to interact with the artist as well as look at, examine, and handle the works of art. - thru Feb 23

opens tomorrow, Jan 9, 6-8p:

Thread Paintings and Larvae Paintings
 Emil Lukas
 
Sperone Westwater Gallery, 257 Bowery, NYC

Lukas’ distinctive use of everyday organic materials, such as thread, silk, or larvae, and his innovative techniques create intricate works, the accumulation of lines characterizes Lukas’ works — materials do not exist independently, but are layered and stratified.  His process is one in which creation and composition occur simultaneously. - thru Feb 22

closing soon, ends Jan 12:

Extreme Measures
 Chris Burden
 
New Museum, 235 Bowery, NYC

Spanning a forty-year career and moving across mediums, “Extreme Measures” presents a selection of Burden’s work focused on weights and measures, boundaries and constraints, where physical and moral limits are called into question.

“As an artist, [Burden] was fast out of the gate, establishing his reputation with a series of exquisitely simple, often incendiary performances from 1971 to 1977. Many lasted only a few seconds, others for up to three weeks. But they tested will, discipline and endurance, sometimes to the point of real danger…  Few people saw Mr. Burden’s performances, but no matter: the best of them could be reduced to a vivid sentence or two that, once heard, stuck in the mind. By the mid-1970s, they formed a familiar litany of indelible acts and documentary photographs. After 54 performances, Mr. Burden succumbed to performance art’s primary occupational hazard: It was too grueling. He had always considered his performances sculptures, and now he turned to making sculptures that he saw as performances: feats or demonstrations that delved more deeply into reality with forms other than his body. His art-world visibility shrank because his efforts could no longer be distilled to an unforgettable sentence or two. They had to be experienced directly, which is what the New Museum’s spacious exhibition is all about.” - Roberta Smith, New York Times

opens tonight, Jan 1, 6-9p:JIM JOE The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYCThe show will be open to the public regular hours beginning January 1st; however, the exhibition will expand one day at a time in a line around the gallery, and will culminate in the closing party on January 31st. The show’s title and presentation are engaged with the rigidity of the calendar month and the flexibility of images and motifs. Both the content of his work and the structure of this particular calendric show seek to question and subvert the knee-jerk expectations placed on both artist and gallery, in the same way he/she questioned what graffiti could be. JIM JOE makes paintings that embrace traditional media but then inverts them, using marks to erase a surface that simultaneously make a figure. Prefab art history stamps are used to make a work on paper, symbols are ordered illogically or rendered crudely to look at the shapes that make the symbol. From crap dragged in off the street to fine raw linens and oil sticks, the works in the exhibition will appear sequentially but not necessarily create narrative or even relationships. They will act upon themselves, one after the other, in a way that denies even the artist the full spectrum of the show until it is completed on the last day of the month. - thru Jan 31

opens tonight, Jan 1, 6-9p:

JIM JOE
 
The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYC

The show will be open to the public regular hours beginning January 1st; however, the exhibition will expand one day at a time in a line around the gallery, and will culminate in the closing party on January 31st. The show’s title and presentation are engaged with the rigidity of the calendar month and the flexibility of images and motifs. Both the content of his work and the structure of this particular calendric show seek to question and subvert the knee-jerk expectations placed on both artist and gallery, in the same way he/she questioned what graffiti could be. JIM JOE makes paintings that embrace traditional media but then inverts them, using marks to erase a surface that simultaneously make a figure. Prefab art history stamps are used to make a work on paper, symbols are ordered illogically or rendered crudely to look at the shapes that make the symbol. From crap dragged in off the street to fine raw linens and oil sticks, the works in the exhibition will appear sequentially but not necessarily create narrative or even relationships. They will act upon themselves, one after the other, in a way that denies even the artist the full spectrum of the show until it is completed on the last day of the month. - thru Jan 31

opens tonight, Jan 1, 6-9p:“Hot Chicks” Adam Green The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYCan exhibition of new drawings that “explore the female form in unexpected ways, using oil crayons and an assortment of pencils and pens… Bordering on architecture or furniture design, the works are only recognizable as female as each has at least one boob; though most have way, way too many boobs… Green’s unconscious has a somewhat 8-bit sensibility. The bodies are often composed of proliferating blocks, with some including too many eye blocks, too many aforementioned boob blocks, too many mouth blocks, etc. It is as though the image inventory chip to his Nintendo cartridge was functioning properly, however the programming chip that assorted, organized and placed the blocks was malfunctioning.” - thru Jan 31

opens tonight, Jan 1, 6-9p:

Hot Chicks
 Adam Green
 

The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYC

an exhibition of new drawings that “explore the female form in unexpected ways, using oil crayons and an assortment of pencils and pens… Bordering on architecture or furniture design, the works are only recognizable as female as each has at least one boob; though most have way, way too many boobs… Green’s unconscious has a somewhat 8-bit sensibility. The bodies are often composed of proliferating blocks, with some including too many eye blocks, too many aforementioned boob blocks, too many mouth blocks, etc. It is as though the image inventory chip to his Nintendo cartridge was functioning properly, however the programming chip that assorted, organized and placed the blocks was malfunctioning.” - thru Jan 31

just opened:“The Black Box” Stefan BondellThe Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYCThe Black Box is conceived as an exhibition about the secrets paintings can contain. Like the black box of an airplane or the expression as applied to covert ops, insider trading or government surveillance, New York artist Stefan Bondell considers this installation as his own black box, where his concerns and opinions are thrashed out in each of the paintings. Four ten-by-ten-foot paintings are installed in the room, each a deep black gouache and oil on canvas, and through the suggestion of shapes in each work, a narrative emerges. The floor of the gallery has been covered with over a million dollars of shredded US currency. - thru Dec 28

just opened:

The Black Box
 Stefan Bondell

The Hole Gallery, 312 Bowery, NYC

The Black Box is conceived as an exhibition about the secrets paintings can contain. Like the black box of an airplane or the expression as applied to covert ops, insider trading or government surveillance, New York artist Stefan Bondell considers this installation as his own black box, where his concerns and opinions are thrashed out in each of the paintings. Four ten-by-ten-foot paintings are installed in the room, each a deep black gouache and oil on canvas, and through the suggestion of shapes in each work, a narrative emerges. The floor of the gallery has been covered with over a million dollars of shredded US currency.
- thru Dec 28