nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens Tonight, Dec 12, 6-8p:“Domenico Zindato: Recent Drawings”Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th st)Zindato’s work has evolved since he presented his first solo exhibition in New York, at the Phyllis Kind Gallery, in 2000. At that time, his drawings were smaller. Large patches of color and his signature, symbol-like motifs figured in those earlier pictures, but they were less densely compacted than they appear today. As his drawing surfaces grew bigger, the images he created on them did not automatically grow larger in scale, too; that is, he enlarged his compositions’ background swaths of solid colors but he continued to render the lines and sizes of his repeated, random-pattern motifs—hands, eyes, snakes, heads, birds and more—as tiny and as meticulously as ever. As a result, seen from a distance, Zindato’s works of recent years read visually as rhythmic plays of abstract, colored forms. Up close, they pull viewers into thickets of finely elaborated patterns, made up of the artist’s tiny motifs, which are set against those dynamic fields of color.  - thru Jan 18

Opens Tonight, Dec 12, 6-8p:

Domenico Zindato: Recent Drawings”

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th st)

Zindato’s work has evolved since he presented his first solo exhibition in New York, at the Phyllis Kind Gallery, in 2000. At that time, his drawings were smaller. Large patches of color and his signature, symbol-like motifs figured in those earlier pictures, but they were less densely compacted than they appear today. As his drawing surfaces grew bigger, the images he created on them did not automatically grow larger in scale, too; that is, he enlarged his compositions’ background swaths of solid colors but he continued to render the lines and sizes of his repeated, random-pattern motifs—hands, eyes, snakes, heads, birds and more—as tiny and as meticulously as ever. As a result, seen from a distance, Zindato’s works of recent years read visually as rhythmic plays of abstract, colored forms. Up close, they pull viewers into thickets of finely elaborated patterns, made up of the artist’s tiny motifs, which are set against those dynamic fields of color.  - thru Jan 18

opens Tomorrow Thurs, Sept 12, 6-8p:“How to Disappear Completely” Brian Adam DouglasAndrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)solo exhibition of collages and drawings. Brian Adam Douglas is known for his work on the streets of New York City under the moniker Élböw Töe. Virtually all of the works in Douglas’ new series deal with the rebuilding of life and purpose in the wake of catastrophic deconstruction brought on by natural disasters and climate change. They are not merely about the breaking down of things but about an innate capacity to cope with disaster and the rehabilitation of purpose. Spending up to half a year on a single piece, Douglas’ laborious process demands a pictorial integrity where nothing is wasted and everything serves his intensity of purpose. Forgoing the relative ease and fluidity of the brush stroke, the artist methodically builds his compositions through shards of color incised from sheets of paper he has painted, forging a novel way to combine painting and collage into a singular hybrid. - thru Oct 26

opens Tomorrow Thurs, Sept 12, 6-8p:

How to Disappear Completely
 Brian Adam Douglas

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)

solo exhibition of collages and drawings. Brian Adam Douglas is known for his work on the streets of New York City under the moniker Élböw Töe. Virtually all of the works in Douglas’ new series deal with the rebuilding of life and purpose in the wake of catastrophic deconstruction brought on by natural disasters and climate change. They are not merely about the breaking down of things but about an innate capacity to cope with disaster and the rehabilitation of purpose. Spending up to half a year on a single piece, Douglas’ laborious process demands a pictorial integrity where nothing is wasted and everything serves his intensity of purpose. Forgoing the relative ease and fluidity of the brush stroke, the artist methodically builds his compositions through shards of color incised from sheets of paper he has painted, forging a novel way to combine painting and collage into a singular hybrid. - thru Oct 26

Opens Tomorrow, May 11, 5-7pm:“A More Perfect Union” Ralph FasanellaAndrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th Streets)Spanning the entire career of the legendary self-taught New York painter, the works collected in this exhibition reveal many of the subjects and scenes that most captivated Fasanella: urban neighborhoods, labor activism (the Great Strike of 1912, Lawrence, MA), and national tragedies (the assassination of JFK) and traumas (the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg). Today, as demonstrated by the surge of protest by groups like Occupy, and growing recognition of the abiding facts of American economic disparity, Ralph Fasanella’s paintings are more revelatory, and relevant, than ever.

Opens Tomorrow, May 11, 5-7pm:

A More Perfect Union
 Ralph Fasanella

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th Streets)

Spanning the entire career of the legendary self-taught New York painter, the works collected in this exhibition reveal many of the subjects and scenes that most captivated Fasanella: urban neighborhoods, labor activism (the Great Strike of 1912, Lawrence, MA), and national tragedies (the assassination of JFK) and traumas (the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg). Today, as demonstrated by the surge of protest by groups like Occupy, and growing recognition of the abiding facts of American economic disparity, Ralph Fasanella’s paintings are more revelatory, and relevant, than ever.

Opens Tomorrow, Nov 10, 4-7p: “Viewpoint of the Foundry Man” Thornton DialAndrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)The exhibition features approximately fifteen of the artist’s renowned mixed media assemblages, created over the last 3 years. Dial, at the age of eighty-four, is in the midst of creating a visual autobiography commemorating the people, places, and events that have shaped his own life. These new works are smaller in scale but not in vision. They take us back to the artist’s boyhood spent in the fields, barns, and homes of rural Emelle, in the western Alabama farmlands. They witness the growth and proliferation of factories, foundries, and mills near Birmingham, which for decades had employed Dial, his brother, and his sons. They take us into the iron and ore mines, but also into Dial’s family life and most intimate thoughts. These paintings are steeped in personal memories of how things once were, from a perspective that only longevity can provide. - thru Dec 23

Opens Tomorrow, Nov 10, 4-7p:

Viewpoint of the Foundry Man
 Thornton Dial

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)

The exhibition features approximately fifteen of the artist’s renowned mixed media assemblages, created over the last 3 years. Dial, at the age of eighty-four, is in the midst of creating a visual autobiography commemorating the people, places, and events that have shaped his own life. These new works are smaller in scale but not in vision. They take us back to the artist’s boyhood spent in the fields, barns, and homes of rural Emelle, in the western Alabama farmlands. They witness the growth and proliferation of factories, foundries, and mills near Birmingham, which for decades had employed Dial, his brother, and his sons. They take us into the iron and ore mines, but also into Dial’s family life and most intimate thoughts. These paintings are steeped in personal memories of how things once were, from a perspective that only longevity can provide. - thru Dec 23

Opens July 5, 6-9p: “B-OUT” curated by Scott HugAndrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC"Be out. Be outside. Be outside of it. Be outside of the box. Be outside of the system. Be out of order. Be out of control. Be out of the ordinary. Be out of your hair. Be out of your mind. Be outrageous. Be outspoken. Be out loud. Be out of line. Be out of the loop. Be out of bounds. Be outcast. Be out of the Midwest. Be out of the closet. Be out of the Middle East. Be out of gas. Be out of sorts. Be out of power. Be out numbered. Be out for blood. Be out for the count. Be out bid. Be out of pocket. Be out of debt. Be out of commission. Be out of fashion. Be out of place. Be out of sight. Be out of reach. Be out of touch. Be out to lunch. Be out of breath. Be out of time. Be out of space. Be out of body. Be out of this world."

Opens July 5, 6-9p:

B-OUT
 curated by Scott Hug

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC

"Be out. Be outside. Be outside of it. Be outside of the box. Be outside of the system. Be out of order. Be out of control. Be out of the ordinary. Be out of your hair. Be out of your mind. Be outrageous. Be outspoken. Be out loud. Be out of line. Be out of the loop. Be out of bounds. Be outcast. Be out of the Midwest. Be out of the closet. Be out of the Middle East. Be out of gas. Be out of sorts. Be out of power. Be out numbered. Be out for blood. Be out for the count. Be out bid. Be out of pocket. Be out of debt. Be out of commission. Be out of fashion. Be out of place. Be out of sight. Be out of reach. Be out of touch. Be out to lunch. Be out of breath. Be out of time. Be out of space. Be out of body. Be out of this world."

Closes June 23: “To Many Men Strange Fates are Given” Brent GreenAndrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Avenue, NYCa sculpture and animated film by Brent Green. Continuing his tradition of applying new technologies to his staunchly DIY, American folk roots, To Many Men Strange Fates Are Given is built with deconstructed LCD screens, an elaborate welded steel frame, polarized lenses and sets of delicate machine-milled wooden audio horns, all serving as a platform for a new hand drawn three dimensional animation displayed on two layered panels simultaneously, harkening back to the tradition of animating on glass. The animation can only be seen when the viewer looks through the polarized lenses located at three stations on the sculpture. Otherwise, Green’s film is invisible.

Closes June 23:

To Many Men Strange Fates are Given
 Brent Green

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Avenue, NYC

a sculpture and animated film by Brent Green. Continuing his tradition of applying new technologies to his staunchly DIY, American folk roots, To Many Men Strange Fates Are Given is built with deconstructed LCD screens, an elaborate welded steel frame, polarized lenses and sets of delicate machine-milled wooden audio horns, all serving as a platform for a new hand drawn three dimensional animation displayed on two layered panels simultaneously, harkening back to the tradition of animating on glass. The animation can only be seen when the viewer looks through the polarized lenses located at three stations on the sculpture. Otherwise, Green’s film is invisible.

Continues thru Mar 10:Guo Fengyi, Sava Sekulic, Charles SteffenAndrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)The self-taught artists Guo Fengyi (1942 - 2010), Sava Sekulic (1902 - 1989) and Charles Steffen (1927 - 1995) all created works that suggest metamorphosis, depicting the human form in an interim phase between a beginning and a future shape. These otherworldly, transfigured bodies reveal hidden organisms that appear to have been gestating inside their hosts.

Continues thru Mar 10:

Guo Fengyi, Sava Sekulic, Charles Steffen

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave., NYC (bt 18th & 19th St)

The self-taught artists Guo Fengyi (1942 - 2010), Sava Sekulic (1902 - 1989) and Charles Steffen (1927 - 1995) all created works that suggest metamorphosis, depicting the human form in an interim phase between a beginning and a future shape. These otherworldly, transfigured bodies reveal hidden organisms that appear to have been gestating inside their hosts.

Today & Saturday (Nov 11 & 12): 5-8p:
  The  Fantastic Nobodies present:   “Live After Birth: a Situation in Two Parts”
Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave, NYC
"The Fantastic Nobodies are a cast of performance artists who have collaborated together to create remarkable fusions of art and life. This is achieved through a common understanding in the group and the subsequent improvisation in the nature and definition of THE MOMENT.   Acting as reflective mirrors for each other’s creativity, the collective has fostered great breadth of production including: performance, infiltrations, social sculptures, situations, happenings, photography, installations, video, music, poetry, painting, and drawing. These creative actions were consciously honed in an independent, self-made, and reclusive way while sometimes being documented through video and photography.”

Today & Saturday (Nov 11 & 12): 5-8p:

  The  Fantastic Nobodies
 present:  
Live After Birth: a Situation in Two Parts

Andrew Edlin Gallery, 134 Tenth Ave, NYC

"The Fantastic Nobodies are a cast of performance artists who have collaborated together to create remarkable fusions of art and life. This is achieved through a common understanding in the group and the subsequent improvisation in the nature and definition of THE MOMENT. 
 
Acting as reflective mirrors for each other’s creativity, the collective has fostered great breadth of production including: performance, infiltrations, social sculptures, situations, happenings, photography, installations, video, music, poetry, painting, and drawing. These creative actions were consciously honed in an independent, self-made, and reclusive way while sometimes being documented through video and photography.”