nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

Opens Thurs, Apr 10, 6-8p:“Sideshow” Matthew Schreiber Johannes Vogt Gallery, 526 W26th St., NYC #205this first New York solo exhibition by Matthew Schreiber spans across both exhibition spaces of the gallery and combines works across varying mediums including light sculptures, holography, photography, and an immersive architectural intervention that features a laser diode installation and will take over the entire rear gallery.

Opens Thurs, Apr 10, 6-8p:

Sideshow
 Matthew Schreiber
 
Johannes Vogt Gallery, 526 W26th St., NYC #205

this first New York solo exhibition by Matthew Schreiber spans across both exhibition spaces of the gallery and combines works across varying mediums including light sculptures, holography, photography, and an immersive architectural intervention that features a laser diode installation and will take over the entire rear gallery.

Opens Apr 18, 6-9p:“Nude Dudes” René Smith Storefront Ten Eyck Gallery, 324 Ten Eyck St., Brooklyn, NYCRené Smith’s paintings, Nude Dudes, are complicated and radical. Forty years after Playgirl popularized the idea that women could enjoy the male nude, we do not expect to see penises. These are feminist paintings. The subject is important, privileged by its relative absence from our visual culture.  Smith’s work is a sincere ode to longing and the beauty of men’s bodies, but it also addresses the imbalance between the ubiquitous depiction of women’s bare bodies and the dearth of male nakedness.  The paintings depict men’s bodies through a woman’s eyes. The man’s body is presented as a landscape with hills and valleys to roam.  The work also abounds in art historical references, our relationship to photography and formal and painterly ideas about the physical and sensual quality of the pieces themselves.  Friends and professional models posed for Smith’s camera in her studio. She works from these photographs to create her large-scale paintings.

Opens Apr 18, 6-9p:

Nude Dudes
 René Smith
 
Storefront Ten Eyck Gallery, 324 Ten Eyck St., Brooklyn, NYC

René Smith’s paintings, Nude Dudes, are complicated and radical. Forty years after Playgirl popularized the idea that women could enjoy the male nude, we do not expect to see penises. These are feminist paintings. The subject is important, privileged by its relative absence from our visual culture.  Smith’s work is a sincere ode to longing and the beauty of men’s bodies, but it also addresses the imbalance between the ubiquitous depiction of women’s bare bodies and the dearth of male nakedness.  The paintings depict men’s bodies through a woman’s eyes. The man’s body is presented as a landscape with hills and valleys to roam.  The work also abounds in art historical references, our relationship to photography and formal and painterly ideas about the physical and sensual quality of the pieces themselves.  Friends and professional models posed for Smith’s camera in her studio. She works from these photographs to create her large-scale paintings.

recently opened:“Overculture” William Powhida Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYCYou know William Powhida and his colorful painted lists of rants, instructions, jokes and truths. Here they are supersized and in oil paint. “My studio practice is based in drawing, which I like to think of more as a thought process than a way of working.  My work tends to draw out a concept, often a critique, through some formal means. Primarily, I’m known for drawings of trompe l’oeil lists and letters authored in the voice of “Powhida,” a sensationalist, self-loathing and unreliable narrator… While it doesn’t take much to get me drawing, following a critical inquiry to unusual and uncomfortable ends is where the energy is, like having a long conversation about coyotes with a taxidermist.” - William Powhida to The L Magazine’s Paul D’Agostinophoto by Jason Andrew

recently opened:

Overculture
 William Powhida
 
Postmasters Gallery, 54 Franklin St., NYC

You know William Powhida and his colorful painted lists of rants, instructions, jokes and truths. Here they are supersized and in oil paint.

“My studio practice is based in drawing, which I like to think of more as a thought process than a way of working.  My work tends to draw out a concept, often a critique, through some formal means. Primarily, I’m known for drawings of trompe l’oeil lists and letters authored in the voice of “Powhida,” a sensationalist, self-loathing and unreliable narrator… While it doesn’t take much to get me drawing, following a critical inquiry to unusual and uncomfortable ends is where the energy is, like having a long conversation about coyotes with a taxidermist.” - William Powhida to The L Magazine’s Paul D’Agostino

photo by Jason Andrew

continues thru Mar 30:“Still.Life” Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,  Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop YoonOUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYCThe most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

continues thru Mar 30:

Still.Life
 Genesis Belanger, Brent Everett Dickinson,
 Andrew Ross, Katie Torn, Heeseop Yoon

OUTLET gallery, 253 Wilson Ave., Brooklyn, NYC


The most literal nod to the trompe l’oeil character of still life on view at OUTLET gallery is the painstakingly hand-built arrangement of meticulously painted porcelain flowers titled Phase Change, by Genesis Belanger. A multimedia installation by Brent Everett Dickinson explores ideas of time and mortality by synthesizing signature visual and textual elements, such as stock landscape wallpaper, fake rocks, sound and drawing-paintings. Andrew Ross’s custom-built frames and sculptural objects examine the objects and methods of daily life translated through theoretical constructs. Katie Torn’s virtual totemic sculptures are assemblages of physical structures comprised of throwaway objects: old plastic toys, defunct technology, plastic containers and simulated objects found on the Internet. The dense and kinetic wall tapestries of Heeseop Yoon are inspired by the memory and perception of cluttered spaces.

opens Tonight, Mar 16, 6-8p:“Everything Under the Sun: Moon and Stars” Summer Wheat Pocket Utopia, 191 Henry St., NYCIn collaboration with Hansel and Gretel Picture Garden

opens Tonight, Mar 16, 6-8p:

Everything Under the Sun: Moon and Stars
 Summer Wheat
 
Pocket Utopia, 191 Henry St., NYC

In collaboration with Hansel and Gretel Picture Garden

Recommended
Opens Sun, Mar 2nd, 6-8p:

Crosseyed and Painless
 Daniel Rios Rodriguez

Sargent’s Daughters, 179 East B’Way, NYC


Daniel Rios Rodriguez’s work combines the intensely personal with the historical in a manner both humorous and dark.  The paintings begin with drawing into a thick layer of oil paint, and can include collage elements of raw canvas, linen and the scraps of old t-shirts onto the canvas. This is a means of recovery and reinstating a fresh surface, exploring the materiality and variety of textures a painting’s surface can have.

The subject matter of the work spans the immediate and classical: skulls, lemons and tall grass along a river are repeated- calling to mind the traditional vanitas pieces. The search is ongoing and the images are abundant.
- thru Mar 30

opens tonight, Fri, Feb 28, 7-9p:

Trace Evidence
 Doug Young

The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC


Young’s reverse paintings, rendered on the underside of thick glass with automotive paints, are investigations of places and objects that are familiar to us yet feel foreign. The subjects in many of Young’s paintings are iconic rooms and objects associated with bustling activity. The spaces are presented devoid of people and out of context; the empty set of television’s The Price is Right, NASA’s Control Room, and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider are captured in rare moments of inactivity. We are left with an opportunity to examine these rooms and objects closely, to inspect the complex details offered within them, and through this process garner a greater understanding of their purpose and the people, out of frame, who put them to use. Young also depicts objects of historical or personal significance that are captivating in their graphic qualities, starkly and consciously superficial, attractive yet repelling. Abraham Lincoln’s soiled death pillow is presented alongside portraits of a stained bathtub, an open filthy refrigerator, and a previously frozen TV dinner.

opens Fri, Mar 7, 7-9p:“Love Never Saved Anything” Logan Hicks PMM Presents, 154 Stanton St., NYCWhile much of Logan’s work deals with the often analytical, highly contemplative view of the urban environment, the paintings in Love Never Saved Anything were born out of the artist’s experiences and personal set backs this past year. The challenges led him to explore underwater photography as inspiration for these paintings. Logan explains, “The drifting, the weightlessness was how I felt internally. It seemed like the perfect way to capture what I was going through - adrift in a sea of uncertainty.” Having lived near the sea all his life, maritime themes have always been a unique influence for him, but are more explicit in this new body of work. Both haunting and elegant, his new paintings incorporate references from nautical superstitions and sailor traditions and showcase the range of perspectives from which the artist sees his environment.

opens Fri, Mar 7, 7-9p:

Love Never Saved Anything
 Logan Hicks
 
PMM Presents, 154 Stanton St., NYC

While much of Logan’s work deals with the often analytical, highly contemplative view of the urban environment, the paintings in Love Never Saved Anything were born out of the artist’s experiences and personal set backs this past year. The challenges led him to explore underwater photography as inspiration for these paintings. Logan explains, “The drifting, the weightlessness was how I felt internally. It seemed like the perfect way to capture what I was going through - adrift in a sea of uncertainty.” Having lived near the sea all his life, maritime themes have always been a unique influence for him, but are more explicit in this new body of work. Both haunting and elegant, his new paintings incorporate references from nautical superstitions and sailor traditions and showcase the range of perspectives from which the artist sees his environment.

opens tomorrow, Thurs, 6-8p:“Big Girl Now” Klara Kristalova Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 201 Chrystie St., NYCWith each sculpture, Kristalova builds an imaginative narrative around common emotions and everyday situations, turning to a diversity of influences that include music, memory and current events,  literature, myths and fairytales.  Her slightly unsettling hand-painted figures—often hybrids of human, animal, insect or plant forms—communicate a tension but also a balance between states of being or transformation. The idea of transformation, particularly the age of adolescence as a time of both physical and psychological change, has been a recurring theme in Kristalova’s work. In Big Girl Now, Kristalova presents a group of portraits of women rooted in a more established period of the life cycle, suggesting that the transformation of youth does not cease once one is “grown up”.
pictured: Sneak peek of Kristalova’s during installation. This image features “Keyhole Woman,” (2013), “Young Girl Growing,” (2013) and “Twins,” (2014). Image by Lehmann Maupin.

opens tomorrow, Thurs, 6-8p:

Big Girl Now
 Klara Kristalova
 
Lehmann Maupin Gallery, 201 Chrystie St., NYC

With each sculpture, Kristalova builds an imaginative narrative around common emotions and everyday situations, turning to a diversity of influences that include music, memory and current events,  literature, myths and fairytales.  Her slightly unsettling hand-painted figures—often hybrids of human, animal, insect or plant forms—communicate a tension but also a balance between states of being or transformation. The idea of transformation, particularly the age of adolescence as a time of both physical and psychological change, has been a recurring theme in Kristalova’s work. In Big Girl Now, Kristalova presents a group of portraits of women rooted in a more established period of the life cycle, suggesting that the transformation of youth does not cease once one is “grown up”.

pictured: Sneak peek of Kristalova’s during installation. This image features “Keyhole Woman,” (2013), “Young Girl Growing,” (2013) and “Twins,” (2014). Image by Lehmann Maupin.

recently opened:

Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe
 
Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Ave., NYC (at 89th St)

The first comprehensive retrospective of Italian Futurism in a U.S. museum, the exhibition traces the full development of Futurism in Italy, from its inception with F. T. Marinetti’s publication of the Futurist manifesto in 1909 to its demise at the end of World War II. Featuring more than 360 works, including noted paintings and sculptures such as Giacomo Balla’s Paths of Movement + Dynamic Sequences (1913) and Benedetta’s Syntheses of Communications (1933–34), which has never before been presented in America, the exhibition also examines the Futurists’ efforts to refashion everyday life through advertising, architecture, design, fashion, film, music, photography, poetry, and theater.
exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism

pictured:
Gino Severini, Blue Dancer (Ballerina blu), 1912
Futurist Manifesto from 1909 (photo: Suzanne DeChillo/NY Times)
Benedetta Cappa (photo: Suzanne DeChillo/NY Times)
Ardengo Soffici, Simultaneity and Lyrical Chemistry, 1915 (photo: Suzanne DeChillo/NY Times)