nyc art scene

a carefully curated calendar & cumulative catalog of new york city's most interesting art exhibitions and events. hand picked by Arthur Seen & Team

thru Sept 7:“Object Matter” Robert HeineckenThe Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCThis is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Sept 7:

Object Matter
 Robert Heinecken

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

This is the first retrospective of the work of Robert Heinecken since his death in 2006, gathering over 150 works from throughout the artist’s remarkable career, many of them never seen before in New York—including the largest display to date of his altered magazines, which were the backbone of his art. Heinecken described himself as a “para-photographer” because his work stood “beside” or “beyond” traditional notions of the medium. He extended photographic processes and materials into lithography, collage, photo-based painting and sculpture, and installation. Drawing on the countless pictures in magazines, books, pornography, television, and even consumer items such as TV dinners, Heinecken used found images to explore the manufacture of daily life by mass media and the relationship between the original and the copy, both in art and in our culture at large. Thriving on contradictions, friction, and disparity, his examination of American attitudes toward gender, sex, and violence was often humorous and always provocative. 

thru Aug 3:“Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010”The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCSigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

thru Aug 3:

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

Sigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

recommended:“the second life of flowers” Sirikul Pattachote The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYCfirst New York gallery exhibition of Thailand born painter Sirikul Pattachote. “The brittle decomposition of a flower at the end of its purpose is a slow and lonely, bittersweet journey. We can use words like this to describe the action because it is so familiar to our own human experience. Just as the flower serves its purpose we serve ours, we both flourish in the sunshine and grow uniquely beautiful before we leave our legacy and drop our petals along the path to becoming a memory. The ephemeral quality of life and matter is a central theme in Pattachote’s work. Through her paintings, she attempts to record and preserve certain memories and impressions that highlight the potential good that lies in everyone and everything.” - thru Aug 7

recommended:

the second life of flowers
 Sirikul Pattachote
 
The Lodge Gallery, 131 Chrystie St., NYC

first New York gallery exhibition of Thailand born painter Sirikul Pattachote. “The brittle decomposition of a flower at the end of its purpose is a slow and lonely, bittersweet journey. We can use words like this to describe the action because it is so familiar to our own human experience. Just as the flower serves its purpose we serve ours, we both flourish in the sunshine and grow uniquely beautiful before we leave our legacy and drop our petals along the path to becoming a memory. The ephemeral quality of life and matter is a central theme in Pattachote’s work. Through her paintings, she attempts to record and preserve certain memories and impressions that highlight the potential good that lies in everyone and everything.” - thru Aug 7

thru Aug 10:Tara Donovan Pace Gallery, 534 W25th St., NYCPresents two new large-scale sculptures comprised from index cards and acrylic rods, respectively. With these works, the artist continues to explore the phenomenological effect of work created through the accumulation of identical objects. Untitled (index cards), the first such work created by Donovan, is a 13’ x 25’ x 30’ sculpture in eight parts comprised of several million 3x5” white cards stacked and glued into scores of interweaving columnar forms combining to reach a summit on each element. Also featured is a newly completed untitled sculpture made with thousands of acrylic rods. Donovan spends months or even years searching for a method of assembly that allows the simple and immutable characteristics of the chosen material to generate complex, emergent phenomena which keep the viewer cycling between perception of the parts and the whole between the forms themselves and the light that surrounds and divides them. The work draws on both Minimalist and formalist histories, while creating a radically new form which embraces complexity and iterative processing.

thru Aug 10:

Tara Donovan
 
Pace Gallery, 534 W25th St., NYC

Presents two new large-scale sculptures comprised from index cards and acrylic rods, respectively. With these works, the artist continues to explore the phenomenological effect of work created through the accumulation of identical objects. Untitled (index cards), the first such work created by Donovan, is a 13’ x 25’ x 30’ sculpture in eight parts comprised of several million 3x5” white cards stacked and glued into scores of interweaving columnar forms combining to reach a summit on each element. Also featured is a newly completed untitled sculpture made with thousands of acrylic rods. Donovan spends months or even years searching for a method of assembly that allows the simple and immutable characteristics of the chosen material to generate complex, emergent phenomena which keep the viewer cycling between perception of the parts and the whole between the forms themselves and the light that surrounds and divides them. The work draws on both Minimalist and formalist histories, while creating a radically new form which embraces complexity and iterative processing.

newly opened:

All this happened, more or less
 Elizabeth Glaessner
 
P.P.O.W Gallery, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)

Glaessner combines familiar objects with misunderstood and idiosyncratic portraits, often laden with humor that counterpoint her macabre imagery. An exploration of memory, personal history and ritual, Glaessner’s work questions the way in which we relate to and envision our past. Her most recent paintings depict a highly detailed mythology of post-human existence on earth that features anthropomorphic, gelatinous figures in familiar, yet toxic, landscapes. These organic creatures appear as if born from natural forms, like tree trunks and rock formations, in attempt to reconstruct lost histories through the detritus left behind. - thru Aug 15

opens tonight, Sat, June 28, 6-8p:“The Crystal Palace” Rachel Uffner Gallery, 170 Suffolk St., NYC“Named after the site of the first World’s Fair in London in 1851, and on the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, this exhibition aims to take advantage of New York City’s cultural and neighborhood-based diversity in the cacophonous spirit of the Fair, which evolved from focusing on industrialized innovation to a thematic form of cultural exchange. In an attempt to infuse the growing contemporary art district of the Lower East Side with the historical weight of Upper East Side institutions, Rachel Uffner Gallery will exhibit artwork from the vast archives of Richard L. Feigen & Co., and additional private lenders and estates, in conjunction with contemporary artists conversing with their fore-bearers in a thoughtful manner. A cross-cultural-pollination is to be formed, spanning over neighborhoods and over time.”Artists: Balthus, Joseph Cornell, Daniel Gordon, Van Hanos, Robert Indiana, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Ray Johnson, Anya Kielar, Claes Oldenburg, Dushko Petrovich and Roger White, James Rosenquist, Pierre Roy, Peter Saul, Johannes VanDerBeek, and Stan VanDerBeek

opens tonight, Sat, June 28, 6-8p:

The Crystal Palace
 
Rachel Uffner Gallery, 170 Suffolk St., NYC

“Named after the site of the first World’s Fair in London in 1851, and on the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, this exhibition aims to take advantage of New York City’s cultural and neighborhood-based diversity in the cacophonous spirit of the Fair, which evolved from focusing on industrialized innovation to a thematic form of cultural exchange.
 
In an attempt to infuse the growing contemporary art district of the Lower East Side with the historical weight of Upper East Side institutions, Rachel Uffner Gallery will exhibit artwork from the vast archives of Richard L. Feigen & Co., and additional private lenders and estates, in conjunction with contemporary artists conversing with their fore-bearers in a thoughtful manner. A cross-cultural-pollination is to be formed, spanning over neighborhoods and over time.”

Artists: Balthus, Joseph Cornell, Daniel Gordon, Van Hanos, Robert Indiana, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Ray Johnson, Anya Kielar, Claes Oldenburg, Dushko Petrovich and Roger White, James Rosenquist, Pierre Roy, Peter Saul, Johannes VanDerBeek, and Stan VanDerBeek

recommended: opening tonight in 2 locations, 6-8p:“ANOTHER LOOK at DETROIT: PARTS 1 and 2” curated by Todd Levin  Marianne Boesky Gallery, 509 W24th St., NYCMarlborough Chelsea Gallery, 545 W25th St., NYCA joint project between Marianne Boesky Gallery and Marlborough Chelsea, Another Look at Detroit presents works and objects by over fifty artists, designers, and cultural contributors. The focus of this exhibition is the city of Detroit as a creative center, historically through to today. Spanning a period of 150 years, and taking place at both galleries’ Chelsea spaces, this exhibition is by no means a comprehensive survey. Rather, Another Look at Detroit intends to portray a vision as sprawling and complex as the biography of the city itself.pictured: Diego Rivera, Edsel B. Ford, 1932, Oil on canvas

recommended: opening tonight in 2 locations, 6-8p:

ANOTHER LOOK at DETROIT: PARTS 1 and 2
 curated by Todd Levin
 
Marianne Boesky Gallery, 509 W24th St., NYC
Marlborough Chelsea Gallery, 545 W25th St., NYC

A joint project between Marianne Boesky Gallery and Marlborough Chelsea, Another Look at Detroit presents works and objects by over fifty artists, designers, and cultural contributors. The focus of this exhibition is the city of Detroit as a creative center, historically through to today. Spanning a period of 150 years, and taking place at both galleries’ Chelsea spaces, this exhibition is by no means a comprehensive survey. Rather, Another Look at Detroit intends to portray a vision as sprawling and complex as the biography of the city itself.

pictured: Diego Rivera, Edsel B. Ford, 1932, Oil on canvas

just opened:“Gatekeeper” Liene Bosquê, Sinta Tantra, Kate Gilmore  William Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYCgroup show that explores ideas of access, and how the spaces we inhabit enforce or challenge the roles of gender, race, and economic inequalities within societies. Curated by Nicholas Cohn and Katie Whitepictured: Kate Gilmore, Wall Bearer, 2011, Performance Still

just opened:

Gatekeeper
 Liene Bosquê, Sinta Tantra, Kate Gilmore
 
William Holman Gallery, 65 Ludlow St., NYC

group show that explores ideas of access, and how the spaces we inhabit enforce or challenge the roles of gender, race, and economic inequalities within societies. Curated by Nicholas Cohn and Katie White

pictured: Kate Gilmore, Wall Bearer, 2011, Performance Still

opens tonight, 6-8p:

Sargent’s Daughters
 
Sargent’s Daughters Gallery, 179 E. Broadway, NYC

An exhibition of works by 40 women artists exploring the legacy of John Singer Sargent: “When we consider the influence of Sargent on a later generation of artists the question of this participation remains. What has Sargent’s influence on women artists been?  The wide range of artists who react to his work includes sculptors, photographers, painters and installation artists— each drawing on different aspects of his work.”

artists: L.C. Armstrong, Sarah Awad, Whitney Bedford, Ellen Brooks, Rebecca Campbell, Jordan Casteel, Holly Coulis, Zoe Crosher, Jennifer Dalton, Inka Essenhigh, Katie Fischer, Natalie Frank, Joy, Garnett, Orly Genger, Elizabeth Glaessner, Isca Greenfield-Sanders, Jenna Gribbon, Nora Griffin, Jeila Gueramian, Tamara Gonzales, Ellen Harvey, Brad Jones, Field Kallop, Jemima Kirke, Marcia Kure, Saira McLaren, Jesse Mockrin, Kristine Moran, Caris Reid, Jackie Saccoccio, Sandi Slone, Jessica Stoller, Emily Sudd, Betty Tompkins​, Michelle Vaughan, Emily Weiner, Jessica Williams, Robin Williams, Amy Wilson, Letha Wilson

pictured:


Rebecca Campbell, Call her green and the winters cannot fade her., 2012 oil on canvas


Amy Wilson, We are Connected by Light, 2014, needle lace

opens Fri, June 27, 6-8p:“Some Thoughts About Marks” Theodora Allen, Patrick Berran, Daniel Heidkamp, Michael Hunter, Lui Shtini Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYCa group exhibition featuring the work of five young painters working in New York and Los Angeles.pictured: Lui Shtini, Tule, 2014, Oil on board

opens Fri, June 27, 6-8p:

Some Thoughts About Marks
 Theodora Allen, Patrick Berran, Daniel Heidkamp,
 Michael Hunter, Lui Shtini
 
Jack Hanley Gallery, 327 Broome St., NYC

a group exhibition featuring the work of five young painters working in New York and Los Angeles.

pictured: Lui Shtini, Tule, 2014, Oil on board